Character Study on Agabus

Character Study on Agabus

Acts 11: And there stood up one of them named Agabus, and signified by the spirit that there should be great dearth throughout all the world: which came to pass in the days of Claudius Caesar.
Acts 21: And as we tarried there many days, there came down from Judaea a certain prophet, named Agabus.

Chain Links

Dictionary

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Agabus
"A prophet" of the early church, perhaps one of "the seventy" disciples of Christ. He foretold the famine, of which Suetonious and others speak, in the days of Claudius, A. D. 44. It was very severe in Judea; and aid was sent to the church at Jerusalem from Antioch, Acts 11:27 . Many years after, Agabus predicted the sufferings of Paul at the hands of the Jews, Acts 21:10 .

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Agabus
A "prophet," probably one of the seventy disciples of Christ. He prophesied at Antioch of an approaching famine (Acts 11:27,28 ). Many years afterwards he met Paul at Caesarea, and warned him of the bonds and affliction that awaited him at Jerusalem should he persist in going thither (Acts 21:10-12 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Agabus
(from Hebrew agab , "he loved".) A Christian prophet (Acts 9:28; Acts 21:10). He came from Judaea to Antioch while Paul and Barnabas were there, and foretold the famine which occurred the next year in Palestine (for a Jew would mean the Jewish world, by "throughout all the world.".) Josephus records that Helena, queen of Adiabene, a proselyte then at Jerusalem, imported provisions from Egypt and Cyprus, wherewith she saved many from starvation. The famine was in the procuratorship of Cuspius Fadus and Tiberius Alexander, A.D. 44, and lasted four years. In the wider sense of "the world," as the prophecy fixes on no year, but "in the days of Claudius Caesar," it may include other famines elsewhere in his reign, one in Greece, two in Rome.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Agabus
AGABUS . A Christian prophet of Jerusalem ( Acts 11:27 ff; Acts 21:10 f.), whose prediction of a famine over the (civilized) world occasioned the sending of alms from Antioch to Jerusalem. The famine happened, not simultaneously in all countries, in Claudius’ reign (Suetonius, Tacitus). Agabus also foretold St. Paul’s imprisonment, by binding his feet and hands with the Apostle’s girdle (cf. Jeremiah 13:1 ff.).

A. J. Maclean.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Agabus, Saint
Prophet mentioned in the Acts 11,21. According to tradition he was one of the seventy-two disciples, and was martyred at Antioch. Feast, February 13,.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Agabus
(ag' uh buhss) Personal name meaning, “locust.” Prophet in the Jerusalem church who went to visit the church at Antioch and predicted a universal famine. His prophecy was fulfilled about ten years later in the reign of Claudius Caesar (Acts 11:27-29 ). His prediction led the church at Antioch to begin a famine relief ministry for the church in Jerusalem. Later, Agabus went to Caesarea and predicted that Paul would be arrested by the Jews in Jerusalem (Acts 21:10-11 ). Still, his friends could not persuade Paul out of going to Jerusalem.



Hitchcock's Bible Names - Agabus
A locust; the father's joy or feast
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Agabus
A prophet who came from Jerusalem to Antioch, and foretold a famine "throughout all the world: which came to pass in the days of Claudius Caesar." Acts 11:28 . He also foretold that Paul would be bound at Jerusalem and delivered to the Gentiles; which also came to pass. Acts 21:10 . In the former passage it is said that Agabus "signified by the Spirit" that there should be great dearth; and in the latter he said, "Thus saith the Holy Ghost," plainly showing that the prophetic spirit in man was under the immediate guidance of the Holy Spirit, who now dwells in the Christian, to explain to him what was given to the prophets.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Agabus
(Ἄγαβος, a word of uncertain derivation)

The bearer of this name is mentioned on two separate occasions in the Acts (Acts 11:27-30; Acts 21:10-11) and also by Eusebius (HE [Note: E Historia Ecclesiastica (Eusebius, etc.).] ii. 3). He is described as a prophet who resided in Jerusalem, and we find him in a.d. 44 at Antioch, where he predicted that a great famine (q.v. [Note: quod vide, which see.] ) would take place ‘over all the world,’ i.e. over all the Roman Empire. The immediate effect of this prediction was to call forth the liberality of the Christians of Antioch and lead them to send help to the poor brethren of Judaea (Acts 11:29). The writer of the Acts tells ns that this famine took place in the reign of Claudius. Roman historians speak of widespread and repeated famines in this reign (Sueton. Claudius, xviii.; Dion Cass. lx.; Tac. Ann. xii. 43), and Josephus testifies to the severity of the famine in Palestine and refers to measures adopted for its relief (Ant. iii. xv. 3, xx. ii. 5, v. 2). Though Syria and the East may have suffered most on this occasion, the whole Empire could not fail to be more or less affected, and it is hypercritical to accuse the author of the Acts of ‘unhistorical generalization’ for speaking of a famine ‘over all the world,’ as is done by Schürer (GJV [Note: JV Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes (Schürer).] 4 i. [1901] 543, 567; cf. Ramsay, St. Paul, 1895, p. 48f., and Was Christ born at Bethlehem?, 1898, p. 251f.).

Again in a.d. 59 we hear of Agabus at Caesarea, where he met St. Paul on his return from his third missionary journey. Taking the Apostle’s girdle, he bound his own hands and feet, and in the symbolic manner of the ancient Hebrew prophets predicted that so the Jews would bind the owner of the girdle and hand him over to the Gentiles (Acts 21:10-11). The prophecy failed to move St. Paul from his resolve. There is no means of ascertaining whether Agabus was a prophet in the higher NT sense-a preacher or forth-teller of the Word; or whether he was merely a successful soothsayer. It is difficult to see what good end could be served by the second of his recorded predictions. Tradition makes him one of the ‘seventy’ and a martyr at Antioch.

W. F. Boyd.

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Agabus
a prophet, and as the Greeks say, one of the seventy disciples of our Saviour. He foretold that there would be a great famine over all the earth; which came to pass accordingly, under the emperor Claudius, in the fourth year of his reign, A.D. 44, Acts 11:28 .

Ten years after this, as St. Paul was going to Jerusalem, and had already landed at Caesarea, in Palestine, the same prophet, Agabus, arrived there, and coming to visit St. Paul and his company, he took this Apostle's girdle, and binding himself hand and feet, he said, "Thus saith the Holy Ghost, So shall the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man that owneth this girdle, and shall deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles," Acts 21:10 . We know no other particulars of the life of Agabus. The Greeks say that he suffered martyrdom at Antioch.

Sentence search

Agabus - Agabus . Agabus also foretold St
Agabus - Paul was going to Jerusalem, and had already landed at Caesarea, in Palestine, the same prophet, Agabus, arrived there, and coming to visit St. We know no other particulars of the life of Agabus
Agabus - Many years after, Agabus predicted the sufferings of Paul at the hands of the Jews, Acts 21:10
Agabus - Later, Agabus went to Caesarea and predicted that Paul would be arrested by the Jews in Jerusalem (Acts 21:10-11 )
Claudius - The prophet Agabus announced a coming famine during Claudius' reign (Acts 11:28 )
Claudius Caesar - About this time probably occurred the famine foretold by Agabus, Acts 11:28
Agabus - In the former passage it is said that Agabus "signified by the Spirit" that there should be great dearth; and in the latter he said, "Thus saith the Holy Ghost," plainly showing that the prophetic spirit in man was under the immediate guidance of the Holy Spirit, who now dwells in the Christian, to explain to him what was given to the prophets
Famine - A famine was predicted by Agabus (Acts 11:28 )
Agabus - 59 we hear of Agabus at Caesarea, where he met St. There is no means of ascertaining whether Agabus was a prophet in the higher NT sense-a preacher or forth-teller of the Word; or whether he was merely a successful soothsayer
Famine - We read in the New Testament, Acts 11:28, of a famine predicted by a Christian prophet named Agabus
Claudius - The great famine over the whole of the Roman world which Agabus foretold took place in his reign
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - And as we tarried there many days, there came down from Judea a certain prophet, named Agabus. And thus it was that this strange Agabus was the last sanctification of Philip and his wife and his four prophetical daughters. And then Agabus arrived just at the moment to be gifted and employed and honoured far above them all. In the rich grace and manifold wisdom of God, outwardly and ostensibly and on the surface, Agabus's errand was to foretell Paul about his future arrest at Jerusalem. But, far deeper than that, Agabus had a finishing work of the Holy Ghost to perform on Philip, and on his four daughters, and on their mother, that grave woman. A work of saying, Agabus must increase, and I must decrease. ' Agabus was an evil enough messenger to Paul; but he was such a staggering blow to Philip and to his whole household that it took all Paul's insight, and skill in souls, and authority with Philip, and power with God, to guide and direct Philip so as that he should get all God's intended good to himself and to all his house out of it. ... Now, Agabus does not come to your house and mine in such open and such dramatic ways as he came to Philip's house; but he comes. Agabus of Jerusalem came to Jonathan Edwards's grave and godly wife in Northampton in the shape of a young preacher. " Agabus, and Mr
Prophecy, Prophet - we read that Philip had four virgin daughters who 'prophesied;' and Agabus foretold that Paul would be bound at Jerusalem and be delivered to the Gentiles
Feet - In the spirit of dramatic symbolism, Agabus (q
Antioch - At Antioch the Christian prophet Agabus foretold the famine that would shortly overtake the Roman world (Acts 11:28 )
Claudius - About the same time the famine happened which is mentioned Acts 11:28-30 , and was foretold by the Prophet Agabus
Caesarea - It was at Cæsarea that Paul’s arrest in Jerusalem was foretold by Agabus ( Acts 21:8-14 )
Hand - In a similar spirit of symbolism, continuing that of OT prophecy, Agabus (q
Caesarea - At Caesarea the Prophet Agabus foretold that Paul would be bound and persecuted at Jerusalem
Hand - In a similar spirit of symbolism, continuing that of OT prophecy, Agabus (q
Famine - Luke, while careful to maintain the position of Agabus as a prophet, here in the sense of one foretelling the future (cf
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - ( 1 Corinthians 12:10,28 ) That Predictive powers did occasionally exist in the New Testament prophets is proved by the case of Agabus, (Acts 11:23 ) but this was not their characteristic
Seventy (2) - ) as follows:—James (brother of the Lord), Timothy, Titus, Barnabas, Ananias, Stephen, Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Simon, Nicolas, Parmenas, Cleopas, Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus, Andronicus, Amplias, Urbanus, Stachys, Apelles, Aristobulus, Narcissus, Herodion, Rufus, Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Hermas, Patrobas, Rhodion, Jason, Agabus, Linus, Gaius, Philologus, Olympas, Sosipater, Lucius, Tertius, Erastus, Phygellus, Hermogenes, Dermas, Quartus, Apollos, Cephas, Sosthenes, Epaphroditus, Caesar, Marcus, Joseph Barsabbas, Artemas, Clemens, Onesiphorus, Tychicus, Carpus, Euodius, Philemon, Zenas, Aquila, Priscas, Junias, Marcus (2), Aristarchus, Pudens, Trophimus, Lucas the Eunuch, Lazarus. With some probability, indeed, are included all the seven ‘deacons’ (so called), along with some others (as Barnabas, Barsabbas, Marcus, Cleopas, Silas, Agabus, and Ananias), who were primitive disciples resident in or near Palestine
Barnabas - The two together, on Agabus' prophetic announcement of a coming famine, showed the Jewish brethren that they and the Gentile disciples were not forgetful of the love they owed the church in Jerusalem and Judea, by being bearers of contributions for the relief of the brethren in Judea (Acts 11:27-30)
Burial - ... Fine ranges of tombs, said to be of the kings, judges, and prophets, still remain near Jerusalem; but these, many think, are the tomb of Helena, the widow of the king of Adiabene, who settled at Jerusalem and relieved poor Jews in the famine foretold by Agabus under Claudius Caesar
Philip the Evangelist - Philip had now ‘four daughters, virgins, which did prophesy,’ and they, along with Agabus, the prophet who came down from Jerusalem, attempted to divert St
Sign - Though the term sign is not used, Agabus' action in binding Paul with his belt (Acts 21:11 ) parallels the acts of the Old Testament prophets
Oracles - The early church did have prophets like Agabus (Acts 21:10-11 ), who expressed God's word regarding what was to come
Miracles - ] ), though it is not said that he was dead (the reverse seems to be implied in Acts 20:10); in Acts 21:9 of the prophesying of Philip’s daughters; in Acts 21:11 of the prophecy of Agabus; in Acts 28:5 of St
Name - ] the Graecized form of the Latin aquila, ‘eagle’; Ἄγαβος (Agabus), [Note: " translation="">Ezra 2:46, " translation="">Acts 11:28; ExpT ix
Prophecy Prophet Prophetess - Prophets are mentioned in the Acts-Agabus (Acts 11:28; Acts 21:10), Symeon Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, and Manaen, in addition to Barnabas and Saul (Acts 13:1), and Judas and Silas (Acts 15:32)
Paul - When these two Apostles had been thus employed about a year, a prophet called Agabus predicted an approaching famine, which would affect the whole land of Judea. Paul was at Caesarea, the Prophet Agabus foretold by the Holy Ghost, that St
Holy Spirit, Gifts of - In the New Testament, Agabus exemplifies a prophet who can predict the future (Acts 11:27-30 ; 21:10-11 ; cf
Acts of the Apostles - In Acts 11:28 this MS (supported by Augustine), by inserting ‘we,’ makes the writer to have been present at Syrian Antioch when Agabus prophesied
Paul - )... Desiring a helper he fetched Saul from Tarsus to Antioch, and for a whole year they laboured together, and in leaving for Jerusalem (Paul's second visit there, not mentioned in Galatians, being for a special object and for but "few days," Acts 11:30; Acts 12:25) brought with them a token of brotherly love, a contribution for the brethren in Judaea during the famine which was foretold by Agabus and came on under Claudius Caesar (Acts 11:22-30; A
Gospels (2) - This is placed beyond doubt by an instance given later (Acts 21:11), where a prophet, Agabus, begins his prediction with, ‘Thus saith the Holy Ghost’ (cf
Paul - During this interval the prophet Agabus, (Acts 11:28 ) came down from Jerusalem, and crowned the previous intimations of danger with a prediction expressively delivered