Character Study on Apphia

Character Study on Apphia

Philemon 1: And to our beloved Apphia, and Archippus our fellowsoldier, and to the church in thy house:

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American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Apphia
Philippians 1:2 , supposed by some to have been the wife of Philemon.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Apphia
Increasing, a female Christian at Colosse (Philippians 1:2 ), supposed by some to have been the wife of Philemon.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Apphia
Latin; Αppia . The wife, or close relative, of Philemon. She would not otherwise be mentioned with Philemon in the address (Philemon 1:2), on a domestic matter.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Apphia
Productive; fruitful
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Apphia
APPHIA . A Christian lady of Colossæ, a member of the household of Philemon, probably his wife ( Philippians 1:2 ).

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Apphia
(in some Manuscripts and VSS [Note: SS Versions.] Aphphia or Appia)

A Christian lady of Colossae, designated by St. Paul (Philemon 1:2) as ‘sister’ (ἁδελφῇ, so א ADE), in the Christian sense. Authorized Version , following inferior manuscript testimony, substitutes ‘beloved’ (ἀγαπητῇ); some Manuscripts have both words. Grotius regards the name as a softened and hellenized form of the Latin Appia; but Lightfoot (Col. and Philem.3, 1879, p. 306) and Zahn (Introd. to NT, 1909, i. 453) show that the name is Phrygian and is found in numerous ancient Phrygian inscriptions.

Most commentators (following Chrysostom and Theodoret) regard Apphia as Philemon’s wife, since otherwise her name either would not have been introduced at all in a private letter, or at least would have been put after the name of Archippus (q.v. [Note: quod vide, which see.] ), who was an office-bearer. As the wife of Philemon, Apphia would have some claim to be consulted in such a matter as the forgiveness and emancipation of a slave. The possibility, however, of her being the sister (literally) of Philemon is not grammatically excluded if the reading ‘sister’ be accepted.

The ancient Greek Martyrology represents Apphia (along with Philemon) as suffering martyrdom under Nero on Nov. 22 (see Menœa for November).

Literature.-See under Philemon. Henry Cowan.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Apphia
(ap' fih uh) Christian lady Paul greeted as “beloved” while writing Philemon (Acts 26:2 ). Early Christian tradition identified her as Philemon's wife, a claim that can be neither proved nor disproved.



Morrish Bible Dictionary - Apphia
Probably the wife of Philemon, whom Paul addresses in that epistle, ver. 2.

Sentence search

Apphia - Apphia
Apphia - ... Most commentators (following Chrysostom and Theodoret) regard Apphia as Philemon’s wife, since otherwise her name either would not have been introduced at all in a private letter, or at least would have been put after the name of Archippus (q. As the wife of Philemon, Apphia would have some claim to be consulted in such a matter as the forgiveness and emancipation of a slave. ... The ancient Greek Martyrology represents Apphia (along with Philemon) as suffering martyrdom under Nero on Nov
Philemon, Theology of - The letter to Philemon is also addressed to Apphia and Archippus (v. Perhaps Apphia was the wife of Philemon and Archippus was his son
Archippus - A member of Philemon's family, possibly his son, whence Paul includes him in the same salutation with Philemon and Apphia, and the church in Philemon's house (Philemon 1:2)
Philemon - Paul’s greeting is to husband, wife ( Apphia ), and son, with the church in Philemon’s house
Quartus - also 2 Corinthians 8:18; 2 Corinthians 12:18), while two Christian women, Phoebe and Apphia, are alluded to as ‘our sister’ (Romans 16:1, Philemon 1:2)
Philemon, the Epistle to - Paul addresses this epistle also to Apphia, who, from its domestic subject, is supposed to have been Philemon's wife, and to Archippus, a minister of the Colossian (Colossians 4:17) church, and supposed to be Philemon's relative and inmate of his house
Colosse - ... Probably during Paul's "two years" stay at Ephesus, when "all which dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord Jesus" (Acts 19:10; Acts 19:26), Epaphras, Philemon (Philemon 1:2; Philemon 1:13; Philemon 1:19), Archippus, Apphia, and other natives of Colosse (which was on the high road from Ephesus to the Euphrates), becoming converted at Ephesus, were subsequently the first preachers in their own city
Philemon, Epistle to - ) to Philemon, with Apphia and Archlppus, and the church in his house
Philemon Epistle to - -After salutations to Philemon, Apphia, and Archippus (qq
Colossians, Epistle to the - Philemon’s wife, Apphia (Philemon 1:2), bore a Phrygian name