Character Study on Nicolas

Character Study on Nicolas

Acts 6: And the saying pleased the whole multitude: and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and of the Holy Ghost, and Philip, and Prochorus, and Nicanor, and Timon, and Parmenas, and Nicolas a proselyte of Antioch:

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1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mansard, Nicolas Francois
Architect, born Paris, France, 1598; died there, 1666. An exponent of the French Renaissance at its best, he erected several chateaux and hotels distinguished for simplicity and essential beauty of construction. His best works are Maison Lafitte and the plan for the abbey church of Val-de-Grace which he executed, on a smaller scale, in the chapel of the Chateau de Fresnes. The curbed roof with large dormer windows was named mansard from his extensive use of it.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Malebranche, Nicolas
Philosopher, born Paris, France, 1638; died there, 1715. After joining the Oratory he engaged in church history and scriptural studies till his activities were turned to philosophy by the "Traite de l'homme,"of Descartes. In his "Recherche de la verite" he set forth the fundamentals of his own system, advocating occasionalism, maintaining that sensation and imagination are not produced in us by things but by God. His system, which would seem to lead towards pantheism and make God the author of sin, was attacked by Antoine Arnauld and Bossuet and was held in disfavor at Rome.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Nicolas
The victory of the people, a proselyte of Antioch, one of the seven deacons (Acts 6:5 ).

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Nicolas
Nicolas (nĭk'o-las), conqueror of the people. A Jewish proselyte of Antioch, who afterwards embraced Christianity, and was among the most zealous of the first Christians, so that he was chosen one of the seven to minister in the church at Jerusalem. Acts 6:5.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Nicolas Mansard
Architect, born Paris, France, 1598; died there, 1666. An exponent of the French Renaissance at its best, he erected several chateaux and hotels distinguished for simplicity and essential beauty of construction. His best works are Maison Lafitte and the plan for the abbey church of Val-de-Grace which he executed, on a smaller scale, in the chapel of the Chateau de Fresnes. The curbed roof with large dormer windows was named mansard from his extensive use of it.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Nicolas
NICOLAS (lit. ‘conqueror of the people’). Among the Seven chosen in Acts 6:1-15 to minister to the Hellenists or Greek-speaking Jews, was Nicolas, a ‘proselyte of Antioch.’ The remaining six, we infer, were of Jewish birth, for ‘ proselyte ’ is the emphatic word ( Acts 6:5 ). At a later age the Jews divided converts to Judaism into two classes, ‘proselytes of righteousness,’ who were circumcised and who kept the whole Law, and ‘proselytes of the gate,’ who had only a somewhat undefined connexion with Israel. It is probable that this difference in its essence also holds in NT, where the latter class are called ‘ God-fearing ’ or ‘ devout ,’ a description which in Acts appears to be technical (so Lightfoot, Ramsay; this is disputed, however). If the view here stated be true, there were three stages in the advance towards the idea of a Catholic Church: (1) the admission of Nicolas, a full proselyte, to office in the Christian Church, followed by the baptism of the Ethiopian eunuch, also probably a full proselyte ( Acts 8:27 ); (2) the baptism of Cornelius, a ‘God-fearing’ proselyte, i.e . of the latter class; (3) the direct admission of heathen to the Church without their having had any connexion with Judaism.

Nicolas is not further mentioned in NT, but Irenæus and Hippolytus assert that he was the founder of the Nicolaitans of Revelation 2:6 ; Revelation 2:15 (if indeed a real sect is there meant); and Lightfoot thinks that ‘there might well be a heresiarch among the Seven’ ( Galatians 6:1-18 , p. 297). It is, however, equally probable that this was only a vain claim of the late 2nd cent. sect of that name mentioned by Tertullian, for both heretics and orthodox of that and succeeding ages apocryphally claimed Apostolic authority for their opinions and writings; or it is not unlikely that the Nicolaitans of Revelation 2:1-29 were so called because they exaggerated and distorted in an antinomian sense the doctrine of Nicolas, who probably preached the liberty of the gospel. Irenæus and Hippolytus are not likely to have known more about the matter than we do.

A. J. Maclean.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Nicolas Poussin
Painter; born in 1594 in Villers, near Rouen, France; died in 1666 in Rome, Italy. After several attempts as a young artist to reach Rome, he finally succeeded in 1624, and the study of antiquity developed the devotion to classic ideals that characterizes all his work. Choosing subjects from mythology and the Old Testament he attained such fame by 1639 that he was invited to the French court by Louis XIII. The jealousy of rival painters influenced his return to Rome, where he remained till his death. His landscapes are a notable part of his work. The Louvre has many of his canvases, among them The Finding of Moses; Eliezer and Rebecca, and The Blind Men of Jericho. Other works are The Rape of the Sabines; The Childhood of Jupiter; Moses Striking the Rock; Et in Arcadia Ego, and the set called The Seven Sacraments.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Nicolas Malebranche
Philosopher, born Paris, France, 1638; died there, 1715. After joining the Oratory he engaged in church history and scriptural studies till his activities were turned to philosophy by the "Traite de l'homme,"of Descartes. In his "Recherche de la verite" he set forth the fundamentals of his own system, advocating occasionalism, maintaining that sensation and imagination are not produced in us by things but by God. His system, which would seem to lead towards pantheism and make God the author of sin, was attacked by Antoine Arnauld and Bossuet and was held in disfavor at Rome.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Nicolas
Of the seven. Probably having no connection with the Nicolaitans, though Epiphanius (adv. Haer. i. 2, section 25) represents him as sinking into corrupt doctrine and practice. Clemens Alex. (Strom. iii. 4) says that Nicolas, when reproached by the apostles with jealousy, offered his wife to any to marry, but that Nicolas lived a pure life and used to quote Matthias' saying, "we ought to abuse (i.e. mortify) the flesh." No church honours Nicolas, but neither do they honor four others of the seven men. Confounders of Nicolas with the Nicolaitans probably originated these legends.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Nicolas
(nih' coh luhss) Personal name meaning, “conqueror of people.” One of seven Hellenists “full of the Spirit and wisdom” chosen to administer food to the Greek-speaking widows of the Jerusalem church (Acts 6:5 ). Nicolas was a proselyte, that is, a Gentile convert to Judaism, from Antioch. Some Church Fathers connect Nicolas with the heretical sect of the Nicolaitans (Revelation 2:6 ,Revelation 2:6,2:15 ). The name, however, is common, and there is no other reason to associate this Nicolas with a sect active in Asia Minor.



Hitchcock's Bible Names - Nicolas
Same as Nicodemus
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Nicolas
A proselyte of Antioch, one of the seven chosen to look after the poor saints at Jerusalem. Acts 6:5 .

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Nicolas
One of the seven deacons. (Acts 6:5) Some have supposed that he was the head and leader of the sect called the Nicolaitaines; but there are no authorities in Scripture for this. Our Lord saith, (Revelation 2:6) that he hated the deeds of the Nicolaitaines, but he doth not say that Nicolas the deacon was the founder of that sect.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Nicolas
A proselyte of Antioch, that is, one converted from paganism to the religion of the Jews. He afterwards embraced Christianity, and was among the most zealous of the first Christians; so that he was chosen one of the first seven deacons of the church at Jerusalem, Acts 6:5 .

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Vauquelin, Louis Nicolas
French Catholic chemist. Born May 16, 1763; died November 14, 1829. Discovered chromium, beryllium, camphoric and quinic acids, asparagine, and the pigment chrome yellow.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Nicolas
Nicolas, one of the Seven appointed to look after the ministration of alms to the Hellenist widows, is described in the Acts as a proselyte of Antioch (Acts 6:5). He comes last in the list. This description of him is inserted because his admission to office in the Christian Church marks a step taken towards the extension of the Church to the Gentiles. As far as we know, no proselyte, i.e. convert to Judaism from the heathen world, had been given office in the Church, up to this point. A. Harnack (The Acts of the Apostles, Eng. translation , 1909, p. 172) quotes the description of him as a proselyte of Antioch as a proof that this section of the Acts was probably derived from an Antiochene source-surely a very uncertain inference. On his supposed connexion with the Nicolaitans of Revelation 2:6; Revelation 2:15 see article Nicolaitans.

W. A. Spooner.

Sentence search

Nicolas - 4) says that Nicolas, when reproached by the apostles with jealousy, offered his wife to any to marry, but that Nicolas lived a pure life and used to quote Matthias' saying, "we ought to abuse (i. " No church honours Nicolas, but neither do they honor four others of the seven men. Confounders of Nicolas with the Nicolaitans probably originated these legends
Nicolaitanes - Followers of Nicolas
Nicolas - Nicolas was a proselyte, that is, a Gentile convert to Judaism, from Antioch. Some Church Fathers connect Nicolas with the heretical sect of the Nicolaitans (Revelation 2:6 ,Revelation 2:6,2:15 ). The name, however, is common, and there is no other reason to associate this Nicolas with a sect active in Asia Minor
Nicolaus - (nih' coh lay uss) NRSV form of Nicolas (Acts 6:5 ), which more accurately transliterates the Greek Nikolaus
Nicolas - Nicolas (lit. Among the Seven chosen in Acts 6:1-15 to minister to the Hellenists or Greek-speaking Jews, was Nicolas, a ‘proselyte of Antioch. If the view here stated be true, there were three stages in the advance towards the idea of a Catholic Church: (1) the admission of Nicolas, a full proselyte, to office in the Christian Church, followed by the baptism of the Ethiopian eunuch, also probably a full proselyte ( Acts 8:27 ); (2) the baptism of Cornelius, a ‘God-fearing’ proselyte, i. ... Nicolas is not further mentioned in NT, but Irenæus and Hippolytus assert that he was the founder of the Nicolaitans of Revelation 2:6 ; Revelation 2:15 (if indeed a real sect is there meant); and Lightfoot thinks that ‘there might well be a heresiarch among the Seven’ ( Galatians 6:1-18 , p. sect of that name mentioned by Tertullian, for both heretics and orthodox of that and succeeding ages apocryphally claimed Apostolic authority for their opinions and writings; or it is not unlikely that the Nicolaitans of Revelation 2:1-29 were so called because they exaggerated and distorted in an antinomian sense the doctrine of Nicolas, who probably preached the liberty of the gospel
Nicolas - Nicolas (nĭk'o-las), conqueror of the people
Nicolaitans - Some suppose them to be followers of Nicolas the deacon, but there is no good evidence that he ever became a heretic
Nicolaitans - Some suppose them to have been followers of Nicolas the deacon, but there is no good evidence that he ever became a heretic
Nicolas - Our Lord saith, (Revelation 2:6) that he hated the deeds of the Nicolaitaines, but he doth not say that Nicolas the deacon was the founder of that sect
Deacons, Seven - They were Saint Stephen the Martyr, Saint Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolas (Acts 6)
Seven Deacons - They were Saint Stephen the Martyr, Saint Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolas (Acts 6)
Nicolaitans - The name signifies ‘followers of Nicolas,’ as Nicolas = ‘conqueror of the people. 1) he asserts that the Nicolaitans had disseminated their heresy long before Cerinthus, and he makes their founder Nicolas, one of the Seven. 29), has an independent tradition about Nicolas which vindicates his character
Nic'Olas - There is no reason except the simplicity of name for identifying Nicolas with the sect of Nicolaitans which our Lord denounces, for the traditions on the subject are of no value
Nicolaitans - 46) explain, followers of Nicolas one of the seven (Acts 6:3; Acts 6:5) as there was a Judas among the twelve; confounding the later Gnostic Nicolaitans with those of Michaelis explains Nicolas (conqueror of the people) is the Greek for the Hebrew Balsam ("destroyer of the people," bela' 'am ); as we find both the Hebrew and Greek names, Abaddon, Apollyon; Satan, devil
Didacus, Saint - Confessor, born San Nicolas del Puerto, Spain; died Alcala, Spain, 1463
Jean Corot - " The latter is in the church of Saint Nicolas du Chardonnet, in Paris
Chemistry - ... Catholics ...
Jean Antoine Chaptal

Michel Eugene Chevreul

Henri Etienne Sainte-Claire-Deville

Jean Baptiste Dumas

Antoine Laurent Lavoisier

Theophrastus Paracelsus

Louis Pasteur

Pierre Joseph Pelletier

Theophile Jules Pelouze

Louis Jacques Thénard

Louis Nicolas Vauquelin
Other Christian Chemists ...
Johan Jacob Berzelius

Robert Boyle

John Dalton

Sir Humphry Davy

Charles Friedel

Martin Heinrich Klaproth

Justus von Liebig

William Henry Perkins

Joseph Priestley

William Ramsey

Ira Remsen

Christian Friedrich Schonbein

Charles Adolphe Wurtz
Nicolas - Nicolas, one of the Seven appointed to look after the ministration of alms to the Hellenist widows, is described in the Acts as a proselyte of Antioch (Acts 6:5)
Nicolaitanes, a Heretical Sect - 232) says that Hippolytus and Epiphanius make Nicolas the deacon of Act_6:5 answerable for the errors of the sect called after him; whereas Ignatius Clement of Alexandria Eusebius and Theodoret condemn the sect but impute none of the blame to Nicolas himself
University of Saint Andrews - It comprised three colleges: ...
Saint Salvator, founded in 1450 by Bishop James Kennedy, confirmed by Pope Nicolas V

Saint Leonard's, founded by Archbishop Stuart, and Prior Hepburn in 1512

Saint Mary's, founded by Archbishop James Beaton in 1537 and confirmed by Pope Paul III in 1538, today the divinity college of the university
The colleges escaped when the priory (cradle of the university), and the churches were destroyed at the Reformation
Saint Andrews, University of - It comprised three colleges: ...
Saint Salvator, founded in 1450 by Bishop James Kennedy, confirmed by Pope Nicolas V

Saint Leonard's, founded by Archbishop Stuart, and Prior Hepburn in 1512

Saint Mary's, founded by Archbishop James Beaton in 1537 and confirmed by Pope Paul III in 1538, today the divinity college of the university
The colleges escaped when the priory (cradle of the university), and the churches were destroyed at the Reformation
Lydia - Nicolas), whom St
Myra - Nicolas, and he became the patron saint of sailors in the E
Nicolaitans - Whether the Nicolaitans derived their name from Nicolas of Antioch, who was one of the seven deacons:... 2. Supposing this to be the fact, whether Nicolas had disgraced himself by sensual indulgence. Those writers who have endeavoured to clear the character of Nicolas have generally tried also to prove that he was not the man whom the Nicolaitans claimed as their head. But the one point may be true without the other: and the evidence is so overwhelming, which states that Nicolas the deacon was at least the person intended by the Nicolaitans, that it is difficult to come to any other conclusion upon the subject. The same may have been the case with Nicolas the deacon; and though we allow, that if the Nicolaitans were distinguished as a sect some time before the end of the century, the probability is lessened that his name was thus abused; yet if his career was a short one, his history, like that of the other deacons, would soon be forgotten: and the same fertile invention, which gave rise in the two first centuries to so many apocryphal Gospels, may also have led the Nicolaitans to give a false character to him whose name they had assumed
Nicola'Itans - (followers of Nicolas ), a sect mentioned in ( Revelation 2:6,15 ) whose deeds were strongly condemned
Lavigerie, Charles Martial Allemand - Be studied at the diocesan seminary of Larressore, at Saint Nicolas-du-Chardonnet in Paris, and at Saint Sulpice
Stephen - Nicolas), were appointed to manage the distribution of alms to the Hellenist widows
Minnesota - In 1727 Fort Beauharnois was built near the town of Frontenac by Rene Boucher who had in his train two Jesuits, Father Michel (Louis-Ignace) Guignas and Father Nicolas Le Gounor
Louisiana - In 1726 Father Nicolas Beaubois, S
Antioch - Nicolas the deacon was a proselyte of Antioch
Libertines - ] And the glossa interlinearis, of which Nicolas de Lyra made great use in his notes, hath over the word libertini, e regione, denoting that they were so styled from a country
New Orleans, Louisiana, City of - Father Nicolas Ignatius de Beaubois, S
Masona, Bishop of Merida - 348; Nicolas Antonio, Bibl
Jacobus, Bishop of Nisibis - These were all published with a Latin translation, and a learned preface establishing their authenticity, and notes by Nicolas Maria Antonelli in 1756; also in the collection of the Armenian Fathers, pub
Martinus, Bishop of Dumium - ... (10) De Paupertate , a short tract, consisting of excerpts from Seneca, sometimes attributed to Martin, but not mentioned by Florez or by Nicolas Antonio (Bibl
Gnosticism - They derived their name from Nicolas of " translation="">Acts 6:5. ]) says that the followers of Nicolas misunderstood his saying that ‘we must fight against the flesh and abuse it. ’ What Nicolas meant to be an ascetic principle, they took to be an antinomian one
Pseudo-Chrysostomus - It is quoted as Chrysostom's by Nicolas I. , which would allow it time to grow into such repute in an expurgated form as to pass for Chrysostom's with Nicolas I
American Martyrology -

Nicolas Foucault, of the Seminary
Leander (2) - 583, 584, 585, 589, 591, 595, 599; Nicolas Antonio, Bibl
Proselyte - (2) There were proselytes among the multitude who witnessed the miracle of Pentecost (Acts 2:10), some of whom may have been added to the Church; the selection of ‘Nicolas a proselyte of Antioch’ (Acts 6:5) as one of the seven deacons indicates that there was a certain proportion of men of his class in the primitive Christian community
Seventy (2) - ) as follows:—James (brother of the Lord), Timothy, Titus, Barnabas, Ananias, Stephen, Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Simon, Nicolas, Parmenas, Cleopas, Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus, Andronicus, Amplias, Urbanus, Stachys, Apelles, Aristobulus, Narcissus, Herodion, Rufus, Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Hermas, Patrobas, Rhodion, Jason, Agabus, Linus, Gaius, Philologus, Olympas, Sosipater, Lucius, Tertius, Erastus, Phygellus, Hermogenes, Dermas, Quartus, Apollos, Cephas, Sosthenes, Epaphroditus, Caesar, Marcus, Joseph Barsabbas, Artemas, Clemens, Onesiphorus, Tychicus, Carpus, Euodius, Philemon, Zenas, Aquila, Priscas, Junias, Marcus (2), Aristarchus, Pudens, Trophimus, Lucas the Eunuch, Lazarus
Antioch - We hear, however, of one Nicolas, a proselyte of Antioch (Acts 6:5 ), and there may have been more
Gnosticism - " The common source of Epiphanius and Philaster had an article on the Nicolaitanes, tracing the origin of the Gnostics to Nicolas the Deacon (see also Hippolytus, vii. If the beginnings of Gnosticism were thus in apostolic times we need not be surprised that the notices of its origin given by Irenaeus more than a century afterwards are so scanty; and that the teachers to whom its origin has been ascribed Simon Menander Nicolas Cerinthus remain shadowy or legendary characters
Antioch - ‘Nicolas a proselyte of Antioch,’ who was early won to Christianity, and is named among the Seven of the Jerusalem Church (Acts 6:5), was evidently one of that great number of Antiochene Greeks who had previously felt the spell of the Jewish faith
Gospels (Uncanonical) - Pick (paralipomena: Remains of Gospels and Sayings of Christ, Chicago, 1908), Two French treatises overshadowed any English criticism during this period, one a critical study by M, Nicolas (Études sur les évangiles apocryphes, Paris, 1865); the other a Roman Catholic counterpart by Joseph Variot (Las Evangiles apocryphes, Paris, 1878)
Acts of the Apostles - Paul; the episode of Cornelius (who was only a ‘proselyte of the gate,’ or ‘God-fearing,’ one who was brought into relation with the Jews by obeying certain elementary rules, such, probably, as those of Acts 15:29 , but not circumcised [this is disputed; see Nicolas]; this means, therefore, a further step towards Pauline Christianity); the first meeting of Paul and Barnabas with a Roman official in the person of Sergius Paulus in Cyprus, the initial step in the great plan of St