Character Study on Pashur

Character Study on Pashur

1 Chronicles 9: And Adaiah the son of Jeroham, the son of Pashur, the son of Malchijah, and Maasiai the son of Adiel, the son of Jahzerah, the son of Meshullam, the son of Meshillemith, the son of Immer;
Ezra 2: The children of Pashur, a thousand two hundred forty and seven.
Ezra 10: And of the sons of Pashur; Elioenai, Maaseiah, Ishmael, Nethaneel, Jozabad, and Elasah.
Nehemiah 7: The children of Pashur, a thousand two hundred forty and seven.
Nehemiah 10: Pashur, Amariah, Malchijah,
Nehemiah 11: And their brethren that did the work of the house were eight hundred twenty and two: and Adaiah the son of Jeroham, the son of Pelaliah, the son of Amzi, the son of Zechariah, the son of Pashur, the son of Malchiah,
Jeremiah 20: Now Pashur the son of Immer the priest, who was also chief governor in the house of the LORD, heard that Jeremiah prophesied these things.
Jeremiah 20: Then Pashur smote Jeremiah the prophet, and put him in the stocks that were in the high gate of Benjamin, which was by the house of the LORD.
Jeremiah 20: And it came to pass on the morrow, that Pashur brought forth Jeremiah out of the stocks. Then said Jeremiah unto him, The LORD hath not called thy name Pashur, but Magormissabib.
Jeremiah 20: And thou, Pashur, and all that dwell in thine house shall go into captivity: and thou shalt come to Babylon, and there thou shalt die, and shalt be buried there, thou, and all thy friends, to whom thou hast prophesied lies.
Jeremiah 21: The word which came unto Jeremiah from the LORD, when king Zedekiah sent unto him Pashur the son of Melchiah, and Zephaniah the son of Maaseiah the priest, saying,
Jeremiah 38: Then Shephatiah the son of Mattan, and Gedaliah the son of Pashur, and Jucal the son of Shelemiah, and Pashur the son of Malchiah, heard the words that Jeremiah had spoken unto all the people, saying,

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Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Pashur
Release.
The son of Immer (probably the same as Amariah, Nehemiah 10:3 ; 12:2 ), the head of one of the priestly courses, was "chief governor [Heb. paqid nagid, meaning "deputy governor"] of the temple" (Jeremiah 20:1,2 ). At this time the Nagid , Or "governor," of the temple was Seraiah the high priest ( 1 Chronicles 6:14 ), and Pashur was his Paqid , Or "deputy." Enraged at the plainness with which Jeremiah uttered his solemn warnings of coming judgements, because of the abounding iniquity of the times, Pashur ordered the temple police to seize him, and after inflicting on him corporal punishment (forty stripes save one, Deuteronomy 25:3 ; Compare 2 Corinthians 11:24 ), to put him in the stocks in the high gate of Benjamin, where he remained all night. On being set free in the morning, Jeremiah went to Pashur (Jeremiah 20:3,5 ), and announced to him that God had changed his name to Magor-missabib, i.e., "terror on every side." The punishment that fell upon him was probably remorse, when he saw the ruin he had brought upon his country by advising a close alliance with Egypt in opposition to the counsels of (Jeremiah 20:4-6 ). He was carried captive to Babylon, and died there.



A priest sent by king Zedekiah to Jeremiah to inquire of the Lord (1 Chronicles 24:9 ; Jeremiah 21:1 ; 38:1-6 ). He advised that the prophet should be put to death.



The father of Gedaliah. He was probably the same as (1).


Hitchcock's Bible Names - Pashur
That extends or multiplies the hole; whiteness
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Pashur
1. Son of Malchijah, a priest, and ancestor of some who returned from exile. 1 Chronicles 9:12 ; Ezra 2:38 ; Ezra 10:22 ; Nehemiah 7:41 ; Nehemiah 11:12 . Perhaps the same as No. 4.

2. Priest who sealed the covenant. Nehemiah 10:3 .

3. Son of Immer, 'chief governor in the house of the Lord.' He struck Jeremiah and put him in the stocks. Jeremiah said to him that the Lord had called his name MAGOR-MISSABIB, 'fear round about' margin . The Lord would make him a terror to himself and all his friends; and they should fall by the sword. He should be carried into captivity and die there. Jeremiah 20:1-6 .

4. Son of Melchiah or Malchiah: he with others advised Zedekiah to put Jeremiah to death. Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 38:1 .

5. Father of Gedaliah. Jeremiah 38:1 .

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Pashur
("prosperity everywhere") (Gesenius).

1. Jeremiah 20:1-6. A priest, Immer's son, of the 16th order (1 Chronicles 9:12), "chief governor in the house of the Lord." There were 24 in all: 16 of Eleazar's sons, eight of Ithamar's, answering (Luke 22:4) to the captains of the temple (1 Chronicles 24:14). Smote and put in the stocks Jeremiah for foretelling Jerusalem's desolation. On the following day Jeremiah, when brought out of the stocks, foretold that he should be not Pashur but Magor-Missabib, a terror to himself and his friends; he and all in his house, and all his friends to whom he had "prophesied lies" (Jeremiah 5:31; Jeremiah 18:18), should go into captivity and die in Babylon.

2. Jeremiah 21:1; Jeremiah 21:9; Jeremiah 38:1-2; Jeremiah 38:6; 1 Chronicles 24:9; 1 Chronicles 24:14; Nehemiah 11:12. (See MAGOR-MISSABIB.) The house was a chief one in Nehemiah's time (Nehemiah 7:41; Nehemiah 10:3; Nehemiah 12:2). He was sent by Zedekiah to consult Jeremiah on the issue of Nebuchadnezzar's threatened attack, and received a reply foreboding Judah's overthrow. Subsequently, after the respite caused by Pharaoh Hophra had ended and the Chaldees returned to the siege, Pashur was one who besought the king to kill Jeremiah for weakening the hands of the men of war by dispiriting prophecies, and who cast the prophet into the pit of Malchiah.

3. Jeremiah 38:1.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Pashur
1. The son of Immer, a priest and a chief officer in the temple; he violently opposed the prophet Jeremiah, and persecuted him even with blows and confinement in the stocks; but all recoiled on his own head, Jeremiah 20:1-6 .

2. The son of Malchiah, an enemy of Jeremiah, and active in securing his imprisonment, Jeremiah 21:1 ; 38:1-6 . Many descendants of this Pashur returned from captivity at Babylon, 1 Chronicles 9:12 ; Ezra 2:38 .

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Pashur
The son of Immer; a deadly foe to the church. His name is derived from Pashah, to spread; but from his enmity to the people of God while governor in the land, and his cruelty upon the person of the prophet Jeremiah, the prophet called him Magor-missabib, which the margin of the Bible renders fear round about. (See Jeremiah 20:1-6) I pause over the name and character of this man just to remark the blessedness of all times in the church, when the Lord is pleased to give to his exercised people precious testimonies to his truth over and above the grace he manifests to their own hearts. Though, as Asaph saith, apparently the way of the wicked prospereth to outward view, yet to inward feelings they are total strangers to any good; and who shall take upon them to say what sorrows fill their minds? "There is no peace, saith my God, to the wicked." (Isaiah 57:21) When the Lord's people therefore hear of such characters, or behold them in their own neighbourhood, (and they are to be found in every place) and observe in the midst of much outside appearances of gaiety, that they are like so many Pashur Magor-missabibs in themselves, surely a voice from every parish steeple where they dwell could not more loudly testify to the truths of God! I would recommend the reader, at any time, when at a loss to explain what he beholds of the prosperity of the wicked and the adversity of the Lord's exercised family, to read what Asaph, taught by the Holy Ghost, hath said, Psalms 73:1-28, throughout; and if he adds to Asaph's observations what the man of Uz hath said on the same subject, he will find both profitable. (Job 21:7-13) Moses also, the man of God, hath left upon record the portrait of the inward terrors of the haunted mind. (Deuteronomy 28:65-67)

Sentence search

Magor-Missabib - Fear on every side, (Jeremiah 20:3 ), a symbolical name given to the priest Pashur, expressive of the fate announced by the prophet as about to come upon him. Pashur was to be carried to Babylon, and there die
Melchi'ah - (Jehovah's king ), a priest, the father of Pashur
Magormissabib - Symbolical name given by God through Jeremiah to Pashur the priest who had beaten him and placed him in the stocks. God would make Pashur a terror to himself and to all his friends
ma'Gor-Mis'Sabib - by Jeremiah to Pashur the priest when he smote him and put him in the stocks for prophesying against the idolatry of Jerusalem
Pashur - At this time the Nagid , Or "governor," of the temple was Seraiah the high priest ( 1 Chronicles 6:14 ), and Pashur was his Paqid , Or "deputy. " Enraged at the plainness with which Jeremiah uttered his solemn warnings of coming judgements, because of the abounding iniquity of the times, Pashur ordered the temple police to seize him, and after inflicting on him corporal punishment (forty stripes save one, Deuteronomy 25:3 ; Compare 2 Corinthians 11:24 ), to put him in the stocks in the high gate of Benjamin, where he remained all night. On being set free in the morning, Jeremiah went to Pashur (Jeremiah 20:3,5 ), and announced to him that God had changed his name to Magor-missabib, i
Magor-Missabib - (may' gahr-mihss ssay' bihb) Name meaning “terror on every side” which Jeremiah gave to Pashur the priest after the latter had the prophet beaten and put in stocks (Jeremiah 20:3 )
Magor Missabib - Pashur, whose name means "largeness on every side," was to become "terror on every side
Malchiah - ... ... A priest, the father of Pashur (1 Chronicles 9:12 ; Jeremiah 38:1 )
Pashur - Many descendants of this Pashur returned from captivity at Babylon, 1 Chronicles 9:12 ; Ezra 2:38
Jeroham - Son of Pashur, a priest
Immer - Father of Pashur, the priest and Temple administrator (Jeremiah 20:1 )
Pashur - On the following day Jeremiah, when brought out of the stocks, foretold that he should be not Pashur but Magor-Missabib, a terror to himself and his friends; he and all in his house, and all his friends to whom he had "prophesied lies" (Jeremiah 5:31; Jeremiah 18:18), should go into captivity and die in Babylon. Subsequently, after the respite caused by Pharaoh Hophra had ended and the Chaldees returned to the siege, Pashur was one who besought the king to kill Jeremiah for weakening the hands of the men of war by dispiriting prophecies, and who cast the prophet into the pit of Malchiah
Malchiah - And the father of Pashur was a Malchiah; as he was also the worthless character whose name is rendered memorable, in infamy, for his cruelty to God's prophet
Pash'ur - Again somewhat later Pashur joined with several other chief men in petitioning the king that Jeremiah might be put to death as a traitor. For this indignity to God's prophet Pashur was told by Jeremiah that his name was changed to Magor-missabib (terror on every side ) and that he and all his house should be carried captives to Babylon and there die
Malchiah, Malchijah - A priest, father of Pashur
Gedaliah - Son of Pashur and one of the princes who caused Jeremiah to be cast into a dungeon
Joz'Abad - ... A priest of the sons of Pashur, who had married a foreign wife
Jer'Oham - ) ... A descendant of Aaron, of the house of Immer, the leader of the sixteenth course of priests; son of Pashur, and father of Adaiah
Malchijah - Prince of Judah in Jeremiah's time, probably the father of Pashur (Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 38:1 ,Jeremiah 38:1,38:6 ); 4
Jehoiarib - But the Talmud makes these professed representatives of the old 24 courses to have been not really descendants from the original heads, except from four of them, Jedaiah, Immer, Pashur, and Harim, for which the Babylonian Talmud has Joiarib (as implied in Ezra 2:36-39; Nehemiah 7:39-42); and that these four were subdivided into six each to make the 24; and that the 24 took the old names (Luke 1:5)
Nethan'e-el - ) ... A priest of the family of Pashur, in the time of Ezra, who married a foreign wife
Nethaneel - roA priest and son of Pashur who had married a foreign wife while exiled in Babylon (Ezra 10:22 )
Pashur - " (Isaiah 57:21) When the Lord's people therefore hear of such characters, or behold them in their own neighbourhood, (and they are to be found in every place) and observe in the midst of much outside appearances of gaiety, that they are like so many Pashur Magor-missabibs in themselves, surely a voice from every parish steeple where they dwell could not more loudly testify to the truths of God! I would recommend the reader, at any time, when at a loss to explain what he beholds of the prosperity of the wicked and the adversity of the Lord's exercised family, to read what Asaph, taught by the Holy Ghost, hath said, Psalms 73:1-28, throughout; and if he adds to Asaph's observations what the man of Uz hath said on the same subject, he will find both profitable
ma-Ase'Iah - (Ezra 10:21 ) ... A priest, of the sons of Pashur
Jeremiah - And if one here and another there should smite you as Pashur smote Jeremiah, say to him, 'The Lord hath not called thy name Pashur, but Magor-missabib,' and go on with your heart-searching and heart-sanctifying preaching to other people. Pashur, the chief governor, was deputed on one occasion to tame, as we say, Jeremiah's pulpit. And of such sensibility and melancholy was the prophet at the visit of Pashur that the thing was almost done. Till the prophet appeared all of a sudden with a yoke of wood on his neck in his former pulpit next Sabbath, and with this apology to Pashur, and with this autobiographic introduction to his sermon that day: 'Then I said, I will not make mention of Him, or speak any more in His name. ' I suppose every preacher with any fire in his bones has a Pashur or two among his governors. But I do not read that Jeremiah spake as he was moved by Pashur, the governor. Let Pashur preach himself if Jeremiah has too much sensibility, and spirituality, and sympathy, and melancholy for him
Zechariah - Priest, the son of Pashur
Gedaliah - Son of Pashur; one of the princes who caused Jeremiah's imprisonment (Jeremiah 38:1, etc
Vagabond - So that in both, the person was without rest, and always on flight, like Pashur, whose name was Magor-missabib; that is, as the margin of the Bible renders it, fear round about
Violence - On the one hand, Jeremiah's message anticipated the violence of Babylonian destruction; in the context of his complaint, the prophet has just announced to Pashur ben Immer, the priest, that he will go into Babylonian captivity (20:1-6). Furthermore, proclamation of the message elicited a violent act from Pashur ben Immer toward Jeremiah
Zechariah - A priest, son of Pashur, ancestor of Adaiah (Nehemiah 11:12)
Zechari'ah - (Nehemiah 11:5 ) ... A priest, son of Pashur
Jeremiah - ... Pashur, chief governor in the Lord's house, in consequence smote and put him in the stocks (Jeremiah 20:2); when liberated, he renewed his prophecy against the city, denouncing Pashur as about to become Magor Missabib, "terror round about. Zedekiah again sent Pashur and Zephaniah to Jeremiah to inquire of him, and received the reply that submission to the Chaldees is the only way of life (Jeremiah 21:1-9; Jeremiah 38:2 ff); and then the princes accused Jeremiah of weakening the hands of the warriors by such words, and the weak prince left
High Priest - Pashur was the “chief officer in the house of the Lord” (Jeremiah 20:1 )
Jeremiah, Book of - The people laid plots against Jeremiah: he was put in the stocks, and smitten by Pashur, upon whom a doom was denounced
Priest - ... Only four courses returned from Babylon (Ezra 2:36-39): 973 of Jedaiah, 1,052 of Immer, 1,247 of Pashur, 1,017 of Harim