Places Study on Angle

Places Study on Angle

Exodus 14: For Pharaoh will say of the children of Israel, They are entangled in the land, the wilderness hath shut them in.
Isaiah 19: The fishers also shall mourn, and all they that cast angle into the brooks shall lament, and they that spread nets upon the waters shall languish.
Nahum 2: The lion did tear in pieces enough for his whelps, and strangled for his lionesses, and filled his holes with prey, and his dens with ravin.
Habakkuk 1: They take up all of them with the angle, they catch them in their net, and gather them in their drag: therefore they rejoice and are glad.
Matthew 22: Then went the Pharisees, and took counsel how they might entangle him in his talk.
Acts 15: But that we write unto them, that they abstain from pollutions of idols, and from fornication, and from things strangled, and from blood.
Acts 15: That ye abstain from meats offered to idols, and from blood, and from things strangled, and from fornication: from which if ye keep yourselves, ye shall do well. Fare ye well.
Acts 21: As touching the Gentiles which believe, we have written and concluded that they observe no such thing, save only that they keep themselves from things offered to idols, and from blood, and from strangled, and from fornication.
Galatians 5: Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage.
2 Timothy 2: No man that warreth entangleth himself with the affairs of this life; that he may please him who hath chosen him to be a soldier.
2 Peter 2: For if after they have escaped the pollutions of the world through the knowledge of the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, they are again entangled therein, and overcome, the latter end is worse with them than the beginning.

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Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Angle of Incidence
The angle between the chord of an aerocurve and the relative direction of the undisturbed air current.

Webster's Dictionary - Angle of Entry
The angle between the tangent to the advancing edge (of an aerocurve) and the line of motion; - contrasted with angle of trail, which is the angle between the tangent to the following edge and the line of motion.

Webster's Dictionary - Angle
(1):

(n.) A projecting or sharp corner; an angular fragment.

(2):

(n.) A name given to four of the twelve astrological "houses."

(3):

(n.) A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod.

(4):

(n.) The difference of direction of two lines. In the lines meet, the point of meeting is the vertex of the angle.

(5):

(n.) The figure made by. two lines which meet.

(6):

(n.) The inclosed space near the point where two lines meet; a corner; a nook.

(7):

(v. i.) To fish with an angle (fishhook), or with hook and line.

(8):

(v. i.) To use some bait or artifice; to intrigue; to scheme; as, to angle for praise.

(9):

(v. t.) To try to gain by some insinuating artifice; to allure.

King James Dictionary - Angle
AN'GLE, n. L. angulus, a corner. Gr.

In popular language, the point where two lines meet, or the meeting of two lines in a point a corner.

In geometry, the space comprised between two straight lines that meet in a point, or between two straight converging lines which, if extended, would meet or the quantity by which two straight lines, departing from a point, diverge from each other. The point of meeting is the vertex of the angle, and the lines, containing the angle, are its sides or legs.

In optics, the angle of incidence is the angle which a ray of light makes with a perpendicular to the surface, or to that point of the surface on which it falls.

The angle of refraction is the angle which a ray of light refracted makes with the surface of the refracting medium or rather with a perpendicular to that point of the surface on which it falls.

A right angle, is one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an angle of 90 degrees, making the quarter of a circle.

An obtuse angle is greater than a right angle, or more than 90 degrees.

A rectilineal or right-lined angle, is formed by two right lines.

A curvilineal angle, is formed by two curved lines.

A mixed angle is formed by a right line with a curved line.

Adjacent or contiguous angles are such as have one leg common to both angles, and both together are equal to two right angles.

External angles are angles of any right-lined figure without it, when the sides are produced or lengthened.

Internal angles are those which are within any right-lined figure.

Oblique angles are either acute or obtuse, in opposition to right angles.

A solid angle is the meeting of three or more plain angles at one point.

A spherical angle is one made by the meeting of two arches of great circles, which mutually cut one another on the surface of the globe or sphere.

AN'GLE, n. A hook an instrument to take fish, consisting of a rod, a line and a hook, or a line and hook.

AN'GLE,

1. To fish with an angle, or with line and hook. 2. or 1 To fish for to try to gain by some bait or insinuation, as men angle for fish as, to angle for the hearts of people, or to angle hearts.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Angle
Isaiah 19:8 (b) This action indicates that when GOD cursed Egypt then their labors for food and for the necessities of life would be fruitless. They would have difficulty obtaining those things which they needed for daily use. They were enemies of GOD, therefore His curse was upon them.

Habakkuk 1:15 (b) The action in this passage may be taken to mean that there are treacherous dealers who will be caught by the wicked either on their hook or in their net to their own sorrow and destruction. Because the wicked are successful in capturing their prey, they exalt and glorify the methods which they use. In the present day this may be a picture of the methods and programs used by false religious leaders to gain adherents.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Angle
ANGLE . Isaiah 19:8 , Habakkuk 1:15 . The same Heb. word is translated ‘book’ in Job 41:1 .

Webster's Dictionary - Phase Angle
The angle expressing phase relation.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Angle, the, the Angle of the Wall
See Turning of the Wall .



Morrish Bible Dictionary - Angle
Fishing was very common in Egypt, not only with the net, but with the line and hook, Isaiah 19:8 ; and the same were used by the Israelites, for nets are often referred to, and the fish that had the piece of money in its mouth was caught with a hook. Matthew 17:27 . In Habakkuk 1:15 the same things are referred to symbolically for the catching of men for captivity. The apostles of the Lord were made fishers of men.

Webster's Dictionary - Liding Angle
The angle, esp. the least angle, at which a gliding machine or aeroplane will glide to earth by virtue of gravity without applied power.

Webster's Dictionary - Wide-Angle
(a.) Having or covering an angle wider than the ordinary; - applied to certain lenses of relatively short focus. Lenses for ordinary purposes have an angle of 50� or less. Wide-angle lenses may cover as much as 100� and are useful for photographing at short range, but the pictures appear distorted.

Sentence search

Angle - The point of meeting is the vertex of the Angle, and the lines, containing the Angle, are its sides or legs. ... In optics, the Angle of incidence is the Angle which a ray of light makes with a perpendicular to the surface, or to that point of the surface on which it falls. ... The Angle of refraction is the Angle which a ray of light refracted makes with the surface of the refracting medium or rather with a perpendicular to that point of the surface on which it falls. ... A right Angle, is one formed by a right line falling on another perpendicularly, or an Angle of 90 degrees, making the quarter of a circle. ... An obtuse Angle is greater than a right Angle, or more than 90 degrees. ... A rectilineal or right-lined Angle, is formed by two right lines. ... A curvilineal Angle, is formed by two curved lines. ... A mixed Angle is formed by a right line with a curved line. ... Adjacent or contiguous Angles are such as have one leg common to both Angles, and both together are equal to two right Angles. ... External Angles are Angles of any right-lined figure without it, when the sides are produced or lengthened. ... Internal Angles are those which are within any right-lined figure. ... Oblique Angles are either acute or obtuse, in opposition to right Angles. ... A solid Angle is the meeting of three or more plain Angles at one point. ... A spherical Angle is one made by the meeting of two arches of great circles, which mutually cut one another on the surface of the globe or sphere. To fish with an Angle, or with line and hook. or 1 To fish for to try to gain by some bait or insinuation, as men Angle for fish as, to Angle for the hearts of people, or to Angle hearts
Angle of Entry - The Angle between the tangent to the advancing edge (of an aerocurve) and the line of motion; - contrasted with Angle of trail, which is the Angle between the tangent to the following edge and the line of motion
Trihedral - ) Having three sides or faces; thus, a trihedral Angle is a solid Angle bounded by three plane Angles
Bell Crank - A lever whose two arms form a right Angle, or nearly a right Angle, having its fulcrum at the apex of the Angle. It is used in bell pulls and in changing the direction of bell wires at Angles of rooms, etc
Kathetal - ) Making a right Angle; perpendicular, as two lines or two sides of a triAngle, which include a right Angle
Angular - ) Measured by an Angle; as, angular distance. ) Relating to an Angle or to Angles; having an Angle or Angles; forming an Angle or corner; sharp-cornered; pointed; as, an angular figure
Wide-Angle - ) Having or covering an Angle wider than the ordinary; - applied to certain lenses of relatively short focus. Lenses for ordinary purposes have an Angle of 50� or less. Wide-Angle lenses may cover as much as 100� and are useful for photographing at short range, but the pictures appear distorted
Angled - ) of Angle... (2):... (a. ) Having an Angle or Angles; - used in compounds; as, right-Angled, many-Angled, etc
Bevel - ) An instrument consisting of two rules or arms, jointed together at one end, and opening to any Angle, for adjusting the surfaces of work to the same or a given inclination; - called also a bevel square. ) Any Angle other than a right Angle; the Angle which one surface makes with another when they are not at right Angles; the slant or inclination of such surface; as, to give a bevel to the edge of a table or a stone slab; the bevel of a piece of timber. ) To cut to a bevel Angle; to slope the edge or surface of. ) To deviate or incline from an Angle of 90�, as a surface; to slant
Liding Angle - The Angle, esp. the least Angle, at which a gliding machine or aeroplane will glide to earth by virtue of gravity without applied power
Epaule - ) The shoulder of a bastion, or the place where its face and flank meet and form the Angle, called the Angle of the shoulder
Dihedral - ) Of wing pairs, inclined at an upward Angle to each other. ) Of a kite or an aeroplane, having wings that make with one another a dihedral Angle, esp. when the Angle between the upper sides is less than 180�
Elbow - The outer Angle made by the bend of the arm. Any flexure or Angle the obtuse Angle of a wall, building or road. ... EL'BOW, To jut into an Angle to project to bend
Mixtilinear - ) Containing, or consisting of, lines of different kinds, as straight, curved, and the like; as, a mixtilinear Angle, that is, an Angle contained by a straight line and a curve
Anangular - ) Containing no Angle
Kezia - Superficies; the Angle; cassia
Agonic - ) Not forming an Angle
Phase Angle - The Angle expressing phase relation
Bull's-Nose - ) An external Angle when obtuse or rounded
Fly-Fish - ) To Angle, using flies for bait
Semiangle - ) The half of a given, or measuring, Angle
Obtuse-Angular - ) Having an obtuse Angle; as, an obtuse-Angled triAngle
Right-Lined - ) Formed by right lines; rectilineal; as, a right-lined Angle
Reentrant - ) Reentering; pointing or directed inwardds; as, a re/ntrant Angle
Copland - ) A piece of ground terminating in a point or acute Angle
Conchometer - ) An instrument for measuring shells, or the Angle of their spire
Craniofacial - ) Of or pertaining to the cranium and face; as, the craniofacial Angle
Right-Angled - ) Containing a right Angle or right Angles; as, a right-Angled triAngle
Rooftree - ) The beam in the Angle of a roof; hence, the roof itself
Bisectrix - ) The line bisecting the Angle between the optic axes of a biaxial crystal
Cotangent - ) The tangent of the complement of an arc or Angle
Coversed Sine - The versed sine of the complement of an arc or Angle
Cosecant - ) The secant of the complement of an arc or Angle
Cosine - ) The sine of the complement of an arc or Angle
Bisector - ) a straight line which bisects an Angle
Crosshatching - ) In drawing and line engraving, shading with lines that cross one another at an Angle
Oscillometer - ) An instrument for measuring the Angle through which a ship rolls or pitches at sea
Salient - ) A salient Angle or part; a projection. ) Projecting outwardly; as, a salient Angle; - opposed to reentering
Angle of Incidence - The Angle between the chord of an aerocurve and the relative direction of the undisturbed air current
Quarterpace - ) A platform of a staircase where the stair turns at a right Angle only
Eniculation - ) The state of being bent abruptly at an Angle
Angle - Angle
Fleche - ) A simple fieldwork, consisting of two faces forming a salient Angle pointing outward and open at the gorge
Bevilled - ) Notched with an Angle like that inclosed by a carpenter's bevel; - said of a partition line of a shield
Radian - ) An arc of a circle which is equal to the radius, or the Angle measured by such an arc
Rhumb - ) A line which crosses successive meridians at a constant Angle; - called also rhumb line, and loxodromic curve
Trisection - ) the division of an Angle into three equal parts
Replacement - ) The removal of an edge or an Angle by one or more planes
Gerar - a royal city of the Philistines, situate not far from the Angle where the south and west sides of Palestine meet
Bartizan - ) A small, overhanging structure for lookout or defense, usually projecting at an Angle of a building or near an entrance gateway
Acute-Angled - ) Having acute Angles; as, an acute-Angled triAngle, a triAngle with every one of its Angles less than a right Angle
Regma - ) A kind of dry fruit, consisting of three or more cells, each which at length breaks open at the inner Angle
Demigorge - ) Half the gorge, or entrance into a bastion, taken from the Angle of the flank to the center of the bastion
Rectilinear - ) Straight; consisting of a straight line or lines; bounded by straight lines; as, a rectineal Angle; a rectilinear figure or course
Sacrovertebral - ) Of or pertaining to the sacrum and that part of the vertebral column immediately anterior to it; as, the sacrovertebral Angle
Declinator - ) An instrument for taking the declination or Angle which a plane makes with the horizontal plane
Angle - In the lines meet, the point of meeting is the vertex of the Angle. ) To fish with an Angle (fishhook), or with hook and line. ) To use some bait or artifice; to intrigue; to scheme; as, to Angle for praise
Turning of the Wall - The expression used in the KJV elsewhere translated as “the corner butress” (NAS), “the Angle” (NRSV), “the escarpment” (REB), and “the Angle of the wall” (NIV)
Angling - ) of Angle... (2):... (n. ) The act of one who Angles; the art of fishing with rod and line
Top Rake - The Angle that the front edge of the point of a tool is set back from the normal to the surface being cut
Diagonal - ) A right line drawn from one Angle to another not adjacent, of a figure of four or more sides, and dividing it into two parts. ) Joining two not adjacent Angles of a quadrilateral or multilateral figure; running across from corner to corner; crossing at an Angle with one of the sides
Ecliptic - ) A great circle of the celestial sphere, making an Angle with the equinoctial of about 23� 28'. ) A great circle drawn on a terrestrial globe, making an Angle of 23� 28' with the equator; - used for illustrating and solving astronomical problems
Ridge - ) The highest portion of the glacis proceeding from the salient Angle of the covered way. ) The intersection of two surface forming a salient Angle, especially the Angle at the top between the opposite slopes or sides of a roof or a vault
Vireton - ) An arrow or bolt for a crossbow having feathers or brass placed at an Angle with the shaft to make it spin in flying
Babingtonite - ) A mineral occurring in triclinic crystals approaching pyroxene in Angle, and of a greenish black color
Axil - ) The Angle or point of divergence between the upper side of a branch, leaf, or petiole, and the stem or branch from which it springs
Abeam - ) On the beam, that is, on a line which forms a right Angle with the ship's keel; opposite to the center of the ship's side
Basil - ) The slope or Angle to which the cutting edge of a tool, as a plane, is ground. ) To grind or form the edge of to an Angle
Anomaly - The eccentric anomaly is a corresponding Angle at the center of the elliptic orbit of the planet. ) The Angle measuring apparent irregularities in the motion of a planet
Cathetus - ) One line or radius falling perpendicularly on another; as, the catheti of a right-Angled triAngle, that is, the two sides that include the right Angle
Elbow - ) Any turn or bend like that of the elbow, in a wall, building, and the like; a sudden turn in a line of coast or course of a river; also, an angular or jointed part of any structure, as the raised arm of a chair or sofa, or a short pipe fitting, turning at an Angle or bent. ) A sharp Angle in any surface of wainscoting or other woodwork; the upright sides which flank any paneled work, as the sides of windows, where the jamb makes an elbow with the window back. ) To jut into an Angle; to project or to bend after the manner of an elbow
Inclined - ... Inclined plane, in mechanics, is a plane that makes an oblique Angle with the plane of the horizon a sloping plane
Decussation - ) Act of crossing at an acute Angle, or state of being thus crossed; an intersection in the form of an X; as, the decussation of lines, nerves, etc
Conchoid - ) A curve, of the fourth degree, first made use of by the Greek geometer, Nicomedes, who invented it for the purpose of trisecting an Angle and duplicating the cube
Canted - ) Having Angles; as, a six canted bolt head; a canted window. ) Inclined at an Angle to something else; tipped; sloping
Ravelin - ) A detached work with two embankments which make a salient Angle
Clinodiagonal - ) That diagonal or lateral axis in a monoclinic crystal which makes an oblique Angle with the vertical axis
Eniculate - ) Bent abruptly at an Angle, like the knee when bent; as, a geniculate stem; a geniculate ganglion; a geniculate twin crystal
Tower of the Furnaces - (Nehemiah 3:11 ; 12:38 ), a tower at the north-western Angle of the second wall of Jerusalem
Divergency - ) A receding from each other in moving from a common center; the state of being divergent; as, an Angle is made by the divergence of straight lines
Kneejoint - ) A toggle joint; - so called because consisting of two pieces jointed to each other end to end, making an Angle like the knee when bent
Cissoid - , to trisect a plane Angle, and to construct two geometrical means between two given straight lines
Retirade - It usually consists of two faces which make a reentering Angle
Kneed - ) Geniculated; forming an obtuse Angle at the joints, like the knee when a little bent; as, kneed grass
Poets' Corner - An Angle in the south transept of Westminster Abbey, London; - so called because it contains the tombs of Chaucer, Spenser, Dryden, Ben Jonson, Gray, Tennyson, Browning, and other English poets, and memorials to many buried elsewhere
Decussate - ) To cross at an acute Angle; to cut or divide in the form of X; to intersect; - said of lines in geometrical figures, rays of light, nerves, etc
Arris - ) The sharp edge or salient Angle formed by two surfaces meeting each other, whether plane or curved; - applied particularly to the edges in moldings, and to the raised edges which separate the flutings in a Doric column
Sine - See Sine of Angle, below
Redan - ) A work having two parapets whose faces unite so as to form a salient Angle toward the enemy
Elevation - ) The Angle which the style makes with the substylar line. ) The movement of the axis of a piece in a vertical plane; also, the Angle of elevation, that is, the Angle between the axis of the piece and the line o/ sight; - distinguished from direction
Bird's-Mouth - ) An interior Angle or notch cut across a piece of timber, for the reception of the edge of another, as that in a rafter to be laid on a plate; - commonly called crow's-foot in the United States
Corncutter - ) An implement consisting of a long blade, attached to a handle at nearly a right Angle, used for cutting down the stalks of Indian corn
Knife-Edge - ) A piece of steel sharpened to an acute edge or Angle, and resting on a smooth surface, serving as the axis of motion of a pendulum, scale beam, or other piece required to oscillate with the least possible friction
Truncation - ) The replacement of an edge or solid Angle by a plane, especially when the plane is equally inclined to the adjoining faces
Obtuse - to Angles greater than a right Angle, or containing more than ninety degrees
Antonia - Angle, and there are indications of a similar one having stood on the S. Angle
Bevelled - ) Formed to a bevel Angle; sloping; as, the beveled edge of a table
Biprism - ) A prism whose refracting Angle is very nearly 180 degrees
Chamfer - ) The surface formed by cutting away the arris, or Angle, formed by two faces of a piece of timber, stone, etc
Hogback - ) An upward curve or very obtuse Angle in the upper surface of any member, as of a timber laid horizontally; - the opposite of camber
Turnus - The wings are yellow, margined and barred with black, and with an orange-red spot near the posterior Angle of the hind wings
Hook - , "anchor" and "Angle" are akin), is used in Matthew 17:27
Anopheles - They also assume different positions when resting, Culex usually holding the body parallel to the surface on which it rests and keeping the head and beak bent at an Angle, while Anopheles holds the body at an Angle with the surface and the head and beak in line with it
Furnaces, Tower of - The tower was adjacent to the “corner gate” located at the northwest Angle in the second or middle wall of Jerusalem
King Arthur - He championed the oppressed natives against Angle and Saxon invaders
Abased - ... In heraldry, it is used of the wings of eagles, when the tops are turned downwards towards the point of the shield or when the wings are shut, the natural way of bearing them being spread, with the top pointing to the chief of the Angle
Arthur, King - He championed the oppressed natives against Angle and Saxon invaders
Slope - ) Any ground whose surface forms an Angle with the plane of the horizon. ) To take an oblique direction; to be at an Angle with the plane of the horizon; to incline; as, the ground slopes
Caruncula - ) A small fleshy prominence or excrescence; especially the small, reddish body, the caruncula lacrymalis, in the inner Angle of the eye
Corner - The point where two converging lines meet properly, the external point an Angle as, we meet at the corner of the state-house, or at the corner of two streets. The interior point where two lines meet an Angle
Promontory - Especially: (a) The projecting Angle of the ventral side of the sacrum where it joins the last lumbar vertebra
Bight - ) A corner, bend, or Angle; a hollow; as, the bight of a horse's knee; the bight of an elbow
Flexion - ) The bending of a limb or joint; that motion of a joint which gives the distal member a continually decreasing Angle with the axis of the proximal part; - distinguished from extension
Lituus - ) A spiral whose polar equation is r2/ = a; that is, a curve the square of whose radius vector varies inversely as the Angle which the radius vector makes with a given line
Arm - 1: ἀγκάλη (Strong's #43 — Noun Feminine — ankale — ang-kal'-ay ) used in the plural, in Luke 2:28 , originally denoted "the curve, or the inner Angle, of the arm. "Angle" is connected
Ascent - ... (4):... The degree of elevation of an object, or the Angle it makes with a horizontal line; inclination; rising grade; as, a road has an ascent of five degrees
Half-Moon - ) An outwork composed of two faces, forming a salient Angle whose gorge resembles a half-moon; - now called a ravelin
Blockhouse - ) An edifice or structure of heavy timbers or logs for military defense, having its sides loopholed for musketry, and often an upper story projecting over the lower, or so placed upon it as to have its sides make an Angle wit the sides of the lower story, thus enabling the defenders to fire downward, and in all directions; - formerly much used in America and Germany
Cutwater - ) A starling or other structure attached to the pier of a bridge, with an Angle or edge directed up stream, in order better to resist the action of water, ice, etc
Reflection - See Angle of reflection, below. ) A part reflected, or turned back, at an Angle; as, the reflection of a membrane
Corner, Cornerstone - 1: γωνία (Strong's #1137 — Noun Feminine — gonia — go-nee'-ah ) "an Angle" (Eng. , "coign"), signifies (a) "an external Angle," as of the "corner" of a street, Matthew 6:5 ; or of a building, 21:42; Mark 12:10 ; Luke 20:17 ; Acts 4:11 ; 1 Peter 2:7 , "the corner stone or head-stone of the corner" (see below); or the four extreme limits of the earth, Revelation 7:1 ; 20:8 ; (b) "an internal corner," a secret place, Acts 26:26
Hook - (KJV often uses Angle
Acuteness - ) The quality of being acute or pointed; sharpness; as, the acuteness of an Angle
Quoin - ) Originally, a solid exterior Angle, as of a building; now, commonly, one of the selected pieces of material by which the corner is marked
Ricochet - ) A rebound or skipping, as of a ball along the ground when a gun is fired at a low Angle of elevation, or of a fiat stone thrown along the surface of water
Repetition - ) The measurement of an Angle by successive observations with a repeating instrument
Fishhook - A curved or bent device of bone or iron in biblical times used for catching or holding fish (Job 41:1-2 ; Isaiah 19:8 —KJV, “Angle”; Matthew 17:27 )
Pyroxene - ) A common mineral occurring in monoclinic crystals, with a prismatic Angle of nearly 90�, and also in massive forms which are often laminated
Reclination - ) The Angle which the plane of the dial makes with a vertical plane which it intersects in a horizontal line
Polish - From every Angle and in every aspect He is magnificent and beautiful beyond compare
Knee - ) A piece of timber or metal formed with an Angle somewhat in the shape of the human knee when bent
Quarter - ... Notes: (1) In Revelation 20:8 , AV, gonia, "an Angle, corner," is rendered "quarter" (RV, "corner")
Valley - ) The place of meeting of two slopes of a roof, which have their plates running in different directions, and form on the plan a reentrant Angle
Ascent - The degree of elevation of an object, or the Angle it makes with a horizontal line as, a road has an ascent of five degrees
Tee - ) A short piece of pipe having a lateral outlet, used to connect a line of pipe with a pipe at a right Angle with the line; - so called because it resembles the letter T in shape
Roin - ) The projecting solid Angle formed by the meeting of two vaults, growing more obtuse as it approaches the summit
Roin - ) The projecting solid Angle formed by the meeting of two vaults, growing more obtuse as it approaches the summit
Ophel - This wall has been discovered by the engineers of the Palestine Exploration Fund at the south-eastern Angle of the temple area
Breech - ) The external Angle of knee timber, the inside of which is called the throat
Sheep-Gate, the, - " The latter seems to have been at the Angle formed by the junction of the wall of the city of David with that of the city of Jerusalem proper, having the sheep-gate on the north of it
Fender - ) Anything set up to protect an exposed Angle, as of a house, from damage by carriage wheels
Turning - ) The place of a turn; an Angle or corner, as of a road
Elevation - In gunnery, the Angle which the chace of a cannon or mortar, or the axis of the hollow cylinder, makes with the plane of the horizon. In dialling, the Angle which the style makes with the substylar line
Hoe - It is made of a flat blade of iron or steel having an eye or tang by which it is attached to a wooden handle at an acute Angle
Lunette - ) A fieldwork consisting of two faces, forming a salient Angle, and two parallel flanks
Ore - It is made of two curved lines, meeting in an acute Angle in the fesse point
Coin - ) A quoin; a corner or external Angle; a wedge
Quartering - ) At right Angles, as the cranks of a locomotive, which are in planes forming a right Angle with each other
Crotch - ) The Angle formed by the parting of two legs or branches; a fork; the point where a trunk divides; as, the crotch of a tree
Gore - It consists of two arch lines, meeting in an acute Angle in the middle of the fess point
Ham - The inner or hind part of the knee the inner Angle of the joint which unites the thigh and the leg of an animal
Triangle - ) An instrument of percussion, usually made of a rod of steel, bent into the form of a triAngle, open at one Angle, and sounded by being struck with a small metallic rod. ) A draughtsman's square in the form of a right-Angled triAngle. ) A figure bounded by three lines, and containing three Angles
Ore - It is made of two curved lines, meeting in an acute Angle in the fesse point
Edrei - Angle of the Lejah or Argob
Dial - The line on which this plane is erected, is called the substile and the Angle included between the substile and stile, is called the elevation or highth of the stile
Equatorial - ) An instrument consisting of a telescope so mounted as to have two axes of motion at right Angles to each other, one of them parallel to the axis of the earth, and each carrying a graduated circle, the one for measuring declination, and the other right ascension, or the hour Angle, so that the telescope may be directed, even in the daytime, to any star or other object whose right ascension and declination are known
Upright - ) Designating a club in which the head is approximately at a right Angle with the shaft
Pan - ) The distance comprised between the Angle of the epaule and the flanked Angle
Pan - ) The distance comprised between the Angle of the epaule and the flanked Angle
Pavilion - ) A single body or mass of building, contained within simple walls and a single roof, whether insulated, as in the park or garden of a larger edifice, or united with other parts, and forming an Angle or central feature of a large pile
Quadrant - ) The quarter of a circle, or of the circumference of a circle, an arc of 90�, or one subtending a right Angle at the center
Acute - ) Sharp at the end; ending in a sharp point; pointed; - opposed to blunt or obtuse; as, an acute Angle; an acute leaf
Hip - ) The external Angle formed by the meeting of two sloping sides or skirts of a roof, which have their wall plates running in different directions
Patent - ) Spreading; forming a nearly right Angle with the steam or branch; as, a patent leaf
Gennesaret, Sea of - Angle was the fertile plain "Gennesaret
Fork - ) The place where a division or a union occurs; the Angle or opening between two branches or limbs; as, the fork of a river, a tree, or a road
Cone - ) A solid of the form described by the revolution of a right-Angled triAngle about one of the sides adjacent to the right Angle; - called also a right cone
Throat - ) The Angle where the arm of an anchor is joined to the shank
Base - In fortification, the exterior side of the polygon, or that imaginary line which is drawn from the flanked Angle of a bastion to the Angle opposite to it. Any side of a triAngle may be called its base, but this term most properly belongs to the side which is parallel to the horizon. In rectAngled triAngles, the base, properly, is the side opposite to the right Angle
Shape - ) A rolled or hammered piece, as a bar, beam, Angle iron, etc
Amplitude - ) An Angle upon which the value of some function depends; - a term used more especially in connection with elliptic functions
Entrance - ) The Angle which the bow of a vessel makes with the water at the water line
Welt - ) In carpentry, a strip of wood fastened over a flush seam or joint, or an Angle, to strengthen it
Accho - ... The town is situated on the coast of the Mediterranean sea, thirty miles south of Tyre, on the north Angle of a bay to which it gives its name, and which extends in a semicircle of three leagues, as far as the point of Mount Carmel, south-west of Acre
Distant - Remote in place as, a distant object appears under a small Angle
Troll - ) To Angle for with a trolling line, or with a book drawn along the surface of the water; hence, to allure
Dial - It would seem, indeed, that the most ancient sun dial known is in the form of a half circle, hollowed into the stone, and the stone cut down to an Angle
Sharp - Forming an acute or too small Angle at the ridge as a sharp roof
Head - It was the first in the Angle, whether it were disposed at the top of that Angle to adorn and crown it, or at the bottom to support it
Buck - ) To subject to a mode of punishment which consists in tying the wrists together, passing the arms over the bent knees, and putting a stick across the arms and in the Angle formed by the knees
Fillet - ) A concave filling in of a reentrant Angle where two surfaces meet, forming a rounded corner
Aspect - ) The situation of planets or stars with respect to one another, or the Angle formed by the rays of light proceeding from them and meeting at the eye; the joint look of planets or stars upon each other or upon the earth
Meshech - Meshech was the sixth son of Japheth, and is generally mentioned in conjunction with his brother Tubal; and both were first seated in the north-eastern Angle of Asia Minor, from the shores of the Euxine, along to the south of Caucasus; where were the Montes Moschisi, and where, in after times, were the Iberi, Tibareni, and Moschi; near to whom also, or mingled with them, were the Chalybes, who, it is probable, derived their Grecian appellation from the general occupation of the families of Tubal and Meshech, as workers in brass and iron, as the inhabitants of the same countries have been in all ages, for the supply of Tyre, Persia, Greece, and Armenia
Hook - ) A piece of metal, or other hard material, formed or bent into a curve or at an Angle, for catching, holding, or sustaining anything; as, a hook for catching fish; a hook for fastening a gate; a boat hook, etc
Dig - ) Of a tool: To cut deeply into the work because ill set, held at a wrong Angle, or the like, as when a lathe tool is set too low and so sprung into the work
Sheet - ) A rope or chain which regulates the Angle of adjustment of a sail in relation in relation to the wind; - usually attached to the lower corner of a sail, or to a yard or a boom
Mauritania - Ancient name of the northwestern Angle of the African continent, was a great corn-producing region
Mauretania - Ancient name of the northwestern Angle of the African continent, was a great corn-producing region
Easy - An easy ascent or slope, is a slope rising with a small Angle
Shoulder - ) The Angle of a bastion included between the face and flank
Merom - On the west it is walled in by the steep and lofty range of the hills of Kedesh-Naphtali; on the east it is bounded by the lower and more gradually ascending slopes of Bashan; on the north it is shut in by a line of hills hummocky and irregular in shape and of no great height, and stretching across from the mountains of Naphtali to the roots of Mount Hermon, which towers up at the north-eastern Angle of the plain to a height of 10,000 feet
Bonnet - ) A small defense work at a salient Angle; or a part of a parapet elevated to screen the other part from enfilade fire
Pute'Oli - " The city was at the northeastern Angle of the bay
Corner - The Angle of a house (Job 1:19 ) or a street (Proverbs 7:8 ). The "corners of the streets" mentioned in Matthew 6:5 means the Angles where streets meet so as to form a square or place of public resort
Bob - ) To Angle with a bob
Branch - In architecture, branches of ogives are the arches of Gothic vaults, traversing from one Angle to another diagonally, and forming a cross between the other arches, which make the sides of the square, of which these arches are diagonals
Galilee Sea of - At its northwestern Angle was a beautiful and fertile plain called "Gennesaret," and from that it derived the name of "Lake of Gennesaret
Meet - , to come in contact, or into proximity, by approach from opposite directions; to join; to come face to face; to come in close relationship; as, we met in the street; two lines meet so as to form an Angle
Heel - , the obtuse Angle of the lower end of a rafter set sloping
Gal'Ilee, Sea of - (John 6:1 ) At its northwestern Angle was a beautiful and fertile plain called "Gennesaret," and from that it derived the name of "Lake of Gennesaret
Temple, Herod's - At the entrance to a graveyard at the north-western Angle of the Haram wall, a stone was discovered by M. Some affirm that Herod's temple covered the site of Solomon's temple and palace, and in addition enclosed a square of 300 feet at the south-western Angle
Meet - The line A meets the line B and forms an Angle
Cnidus - Angle of Asia Minor, between the islands of Cos and Rhodes
Equal - Having the same magnitude or dimensions being of the same bulk or extent as an equal quantity of land a house of equal size two persons of equal bulk an equal line or Angle
Anchor - It is a strong shank, with a ring at one end, to which a cable may be fastened and with two arms and flukes at the other end, forming a suitable Angle with the shank to enter the ground. ... Foul anchor is when the anchor hooks or is entAngled with another anchor, or with a wreck or cable, or when the slack cable is entAngled
Hang - ) To fit properly, as at a proper Angle (a part of an implement that is swung in using), as a scythe to its snath, or an ax to its helve. ) To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without support from below; to dAngle; to float; to rest; to remain; to stay
Knot - ) A portion of a branch of a tree that forms a mass of woody fiber running at an Angle with the grain of the main stock and making a hard place in the timber. ) To tie in or with, or form into, a knot or knots; to form a knot on, as a rope; to entAngle. ) To entAngle or perplex; to puzzle. ; to become entAngled
e'Gypt - (land of the Copts ), a country occupying the northeast Angle of Africa
Nature - The essence, essential qualities or attributes of a thing, which constitute it what it is as the nature of the soul the nature of blood the nature of a fluid the nature of plants, or of a metal the nature of a circle or an Angle
Cut - One line cuts another at right Angles. To cut across, to pass by a shorter course, so as to cut off an Angle or distance. A near passage, by which an Angle is cut off a shorter cut
Flat - ) Having a head at a very obtuse Angle to the shaft; - said of a club
Beard - Moses forbids them, Leviticus 19:27 , "to cut off entirely the Angle, or extremity of their beard;" that is, to avoid the manner of the Egyptians, who left only a little tuft of beard at the extremity of their chins
Cross - ) A pipe-fitting with four branches the axes of which usually form's right Angle
Drift - ) The Angle which the line of a ship's motion makes with the meridian, in drifting
Sil'Oam - It enters Siloam at the northwest Angle; or rather enters a small rock-cut chamber which forms the vestibule of Siloam, about five or six feet broad
Ashtaroth - Eusebius’ Karnaim Ashtaroth evidently lay in the corner or Angle formed by the rivers Nahr er-Rukkad and Sharî‘at el-Manadireh , in which vicinity tradition places Uz, Job’s fatherland
Return - ) The continuation in a different direction, most often at a right Angle, of a building, face of a building, or any member, as a molding or mold; - applied to the shorter in contradistinction to the longer; thus, a facade of sixty feet east and west has a return of twenty feet north and south
Temple - Warren makes it a rectAngle, 900 ft. Angle are the Phoenician red paint marks. Angle. Angle, 17 ft. Angle of the temple area. Angle. Angle of the altar was the opening through which the victims' blood flowed W
Stone - It is the stone at the Angle of a building, whether at the foundation or the top of the wall
Phenicia - "The Biblical account (1 Kings 5:17,18 ) is accurately descriptive of the massive masonry now existing at the south-eastern Angle (of the temple area), and standing on the native rock 80 feet below the present surface
Bethesda - It is at the north-east Angle of the Temple area, and is the gate through which the Bedawîn still lead their flocks to Jerusalem for sale. (2) Warren and others would place Bethesda at the so-called Twin Pools, in the ditch at the northwest Angle of Antonia, under the convent of the Sisters of Zion
Chief, Chiefest, Chiefly - ... B — 5: ἀκρογωνιαῖος (Strong's #204 — Adjective — akrogoniaios — ak-rog-o-nee-ah'-yos ) denotes "a chief corner-stone" (from akros, "highest, extreme," gonia, "a corner, Angle"), Ephesians 2:20 and 1 Peter 2:6
Raise - In seamen's language, to elevate, as an object by a gradual approach to it to bring to be seen at a greater Angle opposed to laying as, to raise the land to raise a point
Galilee, Sea of - Angle, three and a half miles long by two and a half broad (Matthew 14:34)
Jerusalem - extends from Angle to Angle, without noticing irregularities, about 3930 feet; the east 2754 feet; the south 3425 feet; and the west 2086 feet; the circumference being about two and a third English miles
Temple, Solomon's - " It lies at the bottom of the south-eastern Angle, and Isaiah 3 feet 8 inches high by 14 feet long
Melita - If we deduce the ship's course from that of the wind, from the Angle of the ship's head with the wind, and from the leeway, she must have drifted nearly W
Lamp - They are further characterized by their long tapering, and sometimes straight, spout, which ‘forms a distinct Angle with the bowl
Babel - It is not difficult to trace brick work along each front, particularly at the south-west Angle, which is faced by a wall, composed partly of kiln-burnt brick, that in shape exactly resembles a watch tower or small turret
Eclipse - The reason why the sun is not eclipsed every new moon, nor the moon at every full, is owing to the inclination of the moon's orbit to the plane of the ecliptic, or earth's orbit, is an Angle of about five degrees and a half: in consequence of which, the moon is generally too much elevated above the plane of the ecliptic, or too much depressed below it, for her disk to touch the earth's shadow at full, or for her shadow, or her penumbra, to touch the earth's disk at new
Might, Mighty, Mightily, Mightier - , power (over external things) exercised by strength; Ephesians 6:10 , "of His might;" 2 Thessalonians 1:9 , RV, "(from the glory) of His might" (AV "power"); Revelation 5:12 , RV, "might" (AV, "strength"); Revelation 7:12 , "might;" (b) as an endowment, said (1) of Angles, 2 Peter 2:11 ; here the order is No. in Revelation 18:2 it is said of the voice of an Angle [see E, (c)]; the most authentic mss
Jeru'Salem - It was situated in the southwest Angle of the area, now known as the Haram area, and was, as we learn from Josephus, an exact square of a stadium, or 600 Greek feet, on each side. (Conder ("Bible Handbook," 1879) states that by the latest surveys the Haram area is a quadrAngle with unequal sides. ) Attached to the northwest Angle of the temple was the Antonia, a tower or fortress. The "King's Pool" was probably identical with the "Fountain of the Virgin," at the southern Angle of Moriah. The modern wall, built in 1542, forms an irregular quadrAngle about 2 1/2 miles in circuit, with seven gates and 34 towers
Tabernacle - The roof Angle was probably a right Angle; then every measurement is a multiple of five cubits, except the width of the tabernacle cloth, 21 cubits, and the length of the tent cloth, 44 cubits
Satan - Believers can be tempted by Satan due to a lack of self-control in sexual matters (1 Corinthians 7:5 ), and he can even masquerade as "an Angle of light" to accomplish his purposes (2 Corinthians 11:14 )
Jerusalem - It was situated in the southwest Angle of the area, now known as the Haram area, and was, Josephus tells us, an exact square of a stadium, or 600 Greek feet, on each side. At the northwest Angle of the temple was the Antonia, a tower or fortress. — According to Josephus, the first or old wall began on the north at the tower called Hippicus, the ruins now called Kasi-Jalud at the northwest Angle of the present city, and, extending to the Xystus, joined the council house, and ended at the west cloister of the temple
Temple - The temple was certainly situated in the southwest Angle of the area now known as the Haram area at Jerusalem, and its dimensions were what Josephus states them to be --400 cubits, or one stadium, each way. These gates still exist at a distance of about 365 feet from the southwestern Angle, and are perhaps the only architectural features of the temple of Herod which remain in situ
Fortification And Siegecraft - In place of a straight passageway through the tower, a passage bent at a right Angle like the letter L increased the possibilities of defence. Here we see the massive battering-rams detaching the stones or bricks from an Angle of the wall, while the defenders, by means of a grappling-chain, are attempting to drag the ram from its covering tower
Headship - The corner-stone, a stone fitted into an Angle of the building and binding together the walls which meet at that point, and without which the structure must collapse, represents the Messiah, through whom the theocracy finds its realization. ... ‘Some stone, a fragment, we may conjecture, of the Old Temple, rescued from its ruins, had seemed to the architects unfit for the work of binding together the two walls that met at right Angles to each other
Simeon - In cutting a gate through a water battery at an Angle of the sea wall built by Vespasian, and directly in front of the reputed house of Simon the tanner on the rocky bluff above, the men came on three oval shaped tanner vats hewn out of the natural rock and lined with Roman cement, down near the sea, and similar to those in use 18 centuries ago
Nineveh - Angle of the city, which was swept away; and the water pouring into the city "dissolved" the palace foundation platform, of sundried bricks
Rome - Angle that the earliest legends of Rome are mostly associated. At the Angle of the hill nearest the Tiber was the Tarpeian Rock, from which criminals were hurled. ... Beyond this are the remains of the Mamertine Prison, where the Catilinarian conspirators Lentulus and Cethegus were strAngled by order of the consul Cicero. ... Crossing the Vicus Tuscus or Etrurian Street, which went at right Angles to the Sacra Via, we come to the great Temple of Castor or the Castors
Temple - on 1 Kings 6:31 ; 1 Kings 6:33 ), but pentagonal; in other words, the lintel of the door, instead of being a single cross-beam, consisted of two beams meeting at an Angle
Matthew, Theology of - ... In short, Matthew presents the story of Israel from a radically new Angle: from the beginning (cf
Jeremiah, Theology of - To state the theology of a book is to offer a synthesis of the material from a theological rather than historical Angle of vision
Temple - The south-east corner of the roof of this portico, where the height was the greatest, is supposed to have been the πτερυγιον , pinnacle, or extreme Angle, whence Satan tempted our Saviour to precipitate himself, Matthew 4:5 ; Luke 4:9
Ships, Sailors, And Navigation - The pushing or pulling of a tiller bar socketed into the upper part of the loom adjusted the blade of the oar at an Angle to the hull and thus maneuvered the ship
Balaam - In that self-same, bare-faced, and rag-hooked way did Balak Angle for Balaam, ay, and took him too. And in that self-same, bare-faced, and rag-hooked way are men and women being Angled for and taken every day
Golgotha - This wall, which was probably built by Hezekiah, running in a circle or curve, seems to have had no Angles like the first and third, and therefore to have required no extended description. If, in spite of the statement of Josephus, the wall be drawn with a re-entering Angle so as to exclude the traditional site, there still remain apparently insuperable difficulties in the nature of the ground, since in this case the wall must have been built in a deep valley (Tyropœon), and must have been dominated from without by the adjacent knoll on which the Church of the Holy Sepulchre now stands (Acra)
Babel - Herodotus gives the circumference as 60 miles, the whole forming a quadrAngle, of which each side was 15 miles. The streets crossed at right a Angles, the cross streets to the Euphrates being closed at the river end by brazen gates. ; a separate heap in a long valley (perhaps the river's ancient bed); two lines of rampart meeting at a right Angle, and forming with the river a triAngle enclosing all the ruins except Babil
Sea of Galilee - This arises from the fact that the winds blow violently down the narrow gorges and strike the Sea at an Angle, stirring the waters to a great depth
Jerusalem - Angle
Jerusalem - There is also a smaller depression running axially across the city from West to East, intersecting the Tyropœon at right Angles. A priori it does not seem probable that the traditional site of the Holy Sepulchre should have been without the walls, for it assumes that these made a deep re-entrant Angle for which the nature of the ground offers no justification, and which would be singularly foolish strategically
Palestine - The whole Gospel shows traces of this lack of privacy, and the emphasis of its teachings is often fixed by the Angle at which its detail was seen by the onlookers