Places Study on Bethphage

Places Study on Bethphage

Matthew 21: And when they drew nigh unto Jerusalem, and were come to Bethphage, unto the mount of Olives, then sent Jesus two disciples,
Mark 11: And when they came nigh to Jerusalem, unto Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount of Olives, he sendeth forth two of his disciples,
Luke 19: And it came to pass, when he was come nigh to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount called the mount of Olives, he sent two of his disciples,

Chain Links

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Bethphage
(Hebrew: house of unripe figs) Village on Mount Olivet, near the road from Jerusalem to Jericho (Luke 19), from which began Our Lord's triumphant entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21).

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Bethphage
("house of unripe figs"): testifying the former fertility which no longer remains; a village on the mount of Olives, on the road between Jericho and Jerusalem. Close to Bethany, E. of it, since Bethphage stands first in describing a journey from E. to W. The traditional site is above Bethany, between it and the mountain's top. Schwarz places it W. of Bethany, on the S. shoulder of the mount, above Siloam. Here the colt for Jesus' triumphal entry was found (Matthew 21:1, etc.). The Talmud made Bethphage a district extending from Olivet to the Jerusalem walls. Others allege the sacrificial victims were kept there; this would give significance to its being the point whence the antitypical sacrifice proceeded to Jerusalem.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Bethphage
(behth' fuhjee) Place name meaning, “house of unripe figs.” A small village located on the Mount of Olives near Bethany on or near the road between Jerusalem and Jericho. Reference is made to the village in each of the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew 21:1 ; Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29 ). In each account Bethphage was where Jesus gave instruction to two disciples to find the colt on which he would ride into Jerusalem for His triumphal entry. This may also be the place where the fig tree was cursed (Matthew 21:18-22 ; Mark 11:12-14 , Mark 11:20-26 ). Today one may still find rolling stone tombs in Bethphage, such as our Lord was buried in. See Mt. of Olives; Triumphal Entry .

William Vermillion



Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Bethphage
BETHPHAGE (‘house of figs’). The place whence Christ, on the road from Jericho to Jerusalem, sent His disciples to fetch the ass ( Matthew 21:1 , Mark 11:1 , Luke 19:29 ). It must have been close to Bethany, and is traditionally identified with Abu Dis , a village that satisfies this condition.

R. A. S. Macalister.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Bethphage
House of my month
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Bethphage
Village on the Mount of Olives near to Bethany. Its came signifies 'house of figs ' (hard or unripe). Identified with Kefr el Tor, on the mount half way between Bethany and the top. Matthew 21:1 ; Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29 .

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Bethphage
so called from its producing figs, a small village situated in Mount Olivet, and, as it seems, somewhat nearer Jerusalem than Bethany. Jesus being come from Bethany to Bethphage, commanded his disciples to seek out an ass for him that he might ride, in his triumphant entrance into Jerusalem, Matthew 21:1 , &c. The distance between Bethphage and Jerusalem is about fifteen furlongs.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethphage
Bethphage (bĕth'fa-jee; Eng. bĕth'fâj), house of green figs. A place near Bethany, Matthew 21:1; Mark 11:1; Luke 19:29, and possibly west of that place.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Bethphage
Place of figs, a little village at the eastern foot of the Mount of Olives, near to Bethany, Matthew 21:1 ; Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29 .

Sentence search

Bethphage - Jesus being come from Bethany to Bethphage, commanded his disciples to seek out an ass for him that he might ride, in his triumphant entrance into Jerusalem, Matthew 21:1 , &c. The distance between Bethphage and Jerusalem is about fifteen furlongs
Bethphage - Bethphage (bĕth'fa-jee; Eng
Bethphage - of it, since Bethphage stands first in describing a journey from E. The Talmud made Bethphage a district extending from Olivet to the Jerusalem walls
Bethphage - In each account Bethphage was where Jesus gave instruction to two disciples to find the colt on which he would ride into Jerusalem for His triumphal entry. Today one may still find rolling stone tombs in Bethphage, such as our Lord was buried in
Bethphage - Bethphage (‘house of figs’)
Bethany - A village about 15 stadia (2910 yards or about 1⅝ mile) from Jerusalem ( John 11:18 ) on the road from Jericho, close to Bethphage and on the Mount of Olives ( Mark 11:1 , Luke 19:29 )
Beth'Any - Mark 10:46 And close by the west(?) of another village called Bethphage, the two being several times mentioned together
Beth'Any - Mark 10:46 And close by the west(?) of another village called Bethphage, the two being several times mentioned together
Triumphal Entry - Whether by prearrangement or by divine foreknowledge, the disciples found a colt in Bethphage as Jesus had described (Matthew ties the account closely to Zechariah's prophecy (John 9:9 ), mentioning the colt and its mother
Olives, Mount of - )... On the eastern side, descending from the ascension church to Bethany, are the field of the fruitless figtree, Bethphage, Bethany, Lazarus' house, Lazarus' tomb, stone on which Christ sat when Martha and Mary came to Him. The "sabbath day's journey" (about six furlongs) specified for the information of Gentiles not knowing the locality in Acts 1 is from Olivet's main part and summit (or from Kefr et Tur, Bethphage according to Ganneau: see below), not from the place of actual ascension, Bethany, which is more than twice a sabbath day's journey. , 66) to be the site of Bethphage; but the discovery of "an almost square block of masonry or rock, covered with paintings," not separated from the porous limestone rock of which it forms a part, on the strip to the N. of this road, shows that in the 11th century Christians identified Bethphage with that site. Bethphage must have been, as this stone is, not on the road which Jesus was taking, namely, the narrow ridge to the Mount of Olives; otherwise He need not have sent disciples if He would have to pass it Himself; He said to them, "Go to the village over against you" (Matthew 21:2). ... Ganneau identifies Bethphage with Kefr et Tur, "the village of the Mount of Olives," where exist ancient remains; he thinks it marked on the E
Bethany - ) Bethabara, though dates have long disappeared from the locality, and only olives and figs remain (whence Olivet and Bethphage are named). Bethany was "at" the mount of Olives (Mark 11:1; Luke 19:1-29), near the usual road from Jericho to Jerusalem (Mark 10:46; Mark 11:1), close to Bethphage ("the house of figs"), frequently named with it
Sabbath - ) Ganneau thinks Bethphage marked on the E. "village of the mount"; Bethphage)? (Palestine Exploration Quarterly Statement, Apri1 1878, p
Mount of Olives - Probably the limits were never defined geographically, but the whole area was distinguished, as it is to some extent to-day, by its thick plantations of olives, figs, and palms,—hence the names Bethphage (house of figs) and Bethany (house of dates). Once we read of His approach to the Mount from the Eastern side ‘unto Bethphage and Bethany, at the Mount of Olives’ (Mark 11:1 || Matthew 21:1 || Luke 19:29)
Name, Names - Many places, however, got their designation from a salient natural feature, a well ( beer ), a fountain ( en , in En-gedi ), a meadow ( abel ), a vineyard ( karmel ), woods ( jearim ), in Kirath-jearim ), a hill ( Gibeah, Gibeon, Ramah ), trees ( Bethphage, Bethtappuah, Anab, Abel-hasshittim, Elah, Allon-bacuth ); from some circumstance belonging to the history or legends of the locality, an encampment ( Mahanaim ), a watch-tower ( Migdal, Megiddo, Mizpah ), a village ( Hazer ), a temporary abode of shepherds ( Succoth ), a place of refuge ( Adullam ), a vision ( Bcer-lahai-roi ); from the clan which dwelt there ( Samaria )
Pronunciation of Proper Names - that final e is sounded in Bethphage, Gethsemane, Magdalene, but not in Nazarene, or Urbane
Gospels - The owner of the ass and colt at Bethphage, and the owner of the room where the Last Supper was eaten, evidently knew Jesus when the disciples came with the messages