Places Study on Derbe

Places Study on Derbe

Acts 14: They were ware of it, and fled unto Lystra and Derbe, cities of Lycaonia, and unto the region that lieth round about:
Acts 14: Howbeit, as the disciples stood round about him, he rose up, and came into the city: and the next day he departed with Barnabas to Derbe.
Acts 16: Then came he to Derbe and Lystra: and, behold, a certain disciple was there, named Timotheus, the son of a certain woman, which was a Jewess, and believed; but his father was a Greek:
Acts 20: And there accompanied him into Asia Sopater of Berea; and of the Thessalonians, Aristarchus and Secundus; and Gaius of Derbe, and Timotheus; and of Asia, Tychicus and Trophimus.

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Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Derbe
A small town on the eastern part of the upland plain of Lycaonia, about 20 miles from Lystra. Paul passed through Derbe on his route from Cilicia to Iconium, on his second missionary journey (Acts 16:1 ), and probably also on his third journey (18:23; 19:1). On his first journey (14:20,21) he came to Derbe from the other side; i.e., from Iconium. It was the native place of Gaius, one of Paul's companions (20:4). He did not here suffer persecution (2 Timothy 3:11 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Derbe
(dehr' bih) Important city in region of Lycaonia in province of Galatia in Asia minor. It is apparently near modern Kerti Huyuk. The residents of Derbe and Lystra spoke a different language from the people to the north in Iconium. Paul visited Derbe on his first missionary journey (Acts 14:6 ), fleeing from Iconium. Persecution in Lystra led to a successful preaching mission in Derbe (Acts 14:20-21 ). On the second journey, Paul returned to Derbe (Acts 16:1 ). He apparently visited again on the third journey (Acts 18:23 ). Paul's fellow minister Gaius was from Derbe (Acts 20:4 ).



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Derbe
Near Lystra, E. of the upland plain of Lycaonia, stretching eastwards along the N. of the Taurus range. Probably near the pass ("the Cilician gates") from the plain of Cilicia up to the table land of the interior. Paul fled there from Iconium and Lystra (Acts 14:6; Acts 14:20-21; Acts 16:1). In enumerating places (2 Timothy 3:11) he mentions Lystra but not Derbe, though in the independent history they are mentioned together: a delicate instance of accuracy, for he is here enumerating only those places where he suffered persecution. Gaius or Caius belonged to Derbe, Paul's companion in travel (Acts 20:4). Identified by Hamilton (Researches in Asia Minor, 2:313) with Dirle, near the roots of Taurus near lake Ak-gol.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Derbe
(Δέρβη)

Derbe was one of ‘the cities of Lycaonia’ into which Paul and Barnabas fled when driven from Iconium (Acts 14:6). Strabo says it was ‘on the flanks of the Isaurian region, adhering (ἐπιπεφυκός) to Cappadocia’ (xii. vi. 3). It belonged to that part of Lycaonia which, in the 1st cent. b.c., the Romans added, as an ‘eleventh Strategia,’ to the territory of the kings of Cappadocia (xii. i. 4). From them it was seized, along with the more important town of Laranda, by Antipater the robber (called ὁ Δερβήτης), who is otherwise known as a friend of Cicero (ad Fam. xiii. 73). Antipater was attacked and slain by Amyntas of Galatia (circa, about 29 b.c.), who added Laranda and Derbe to the extensive territories which he ruled as a Roman subject-king. On the death of Amyntas in 25 b.c. his kingdom was formed into the Roman province of Galatia. But the ‘eleventh Strategia’ again received special treatment. After changing hands more than once, it was ultimately added-as the inscriptions on coins indicate-to the kingdom of Antiochus iv., and therefore called ‘Strategia Antiochiane’ (Ptolemy, v. 6), an arrangement which lasted from a.d. 41 to the death of Antiochus in 72. Derbe, however, being required as a fortress city on the Roman frontier, was detached from the Strategia and included in the province of Galatia, after which it received a new constitution, and was named Claudio-Derbe, which was equivalent to Imperial Derbe.

Ethnically and geographically Lycaonian, the city was now politically Galatian. As in Lystra, the educated natives were no doubt bilingual, speaking Lycaonian (Λυκαονιστί, Acts 14:11) among themselves, but using Greek as the language of commerce and culture. Derbe lay on the great trade-route between Ephesus and Syrian Antioch. All the cities on that line had been hellenized by the Seleucids, whose task the Romans now continued. St. Paul’s first visit to Derbe was very successful; he ‘made many disciples’ (Acts 14:21), and the city is not mentioned as one of the places in which he was persecuted (2 Timothy 3:11). It is a striking fact that he made Derbe the last stage of his missionary progress, instead of going on to the neighbouring and greater city of Laranda. His action appears to be prompted by a motive which the historian does not formally state. Because Derbe was the limit of Roman territory, he made it the limit of his mission. He followed the lines of Empire. In his second journey he evidently crossed the Taurus by the Cilician Gates, passed through the kingdom of Antiochus, and so ‘came to Derbe and Lystra’ (Acts 15:41; Acts 16:1). A third visit is probably implied by the statement that ‘he went through the region of Galatia and Phrygia in order, stablishing all the disciples’ (Acts 18:23). On the Southern Galatian theory, the Christians of Derbe formed one of the ‘churches of Galatia’ (1 Corinthians 16:1, Galatians 1:2), and they were among the ἀνόητοι Γαλάται (Galatians 3:1) whom he exhorted to stand fast in their Christian liberty (Galatians 5:1). Imperial Derbe stood in closer relations with the Roman colonies of Antioch and Lystra than with the non-Roman Lycaones of the kingdom of Antiochus.

Sterrett (Wolfe Expedition, 1888, p. 23) placed Derbe between the villages of Zosta and Bossola on the road from Konia to Laranda. In both of these places there are numerous ancient cut stones and inscriptions, but it is doubtful if they are in situ, and W. M. Ramsay thinks that the position of the ancient city is indicated by a large deserted mound, called by the Turks Gudelissin, about 3 miles W.N.W. from Zosta. It still waits to be explored.

Literature.-W. M. Ramsay, The Church in the Roman Empire, 1893, pp. 54-56, The Cities of St. Paul, 1907, p. 385ff., Hist. Com. on Gal., 1899, pp. 228-234; W. Smith. DGRG [Note: GRG Dict. of Greek and Roman Geography.] i. [1856] 770.

James Strahan.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Derbe
A sting
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Derbe
Derbe (der'be). A city of Lycaonia, Acts 14:6; Acts 14:20; Acts 16:1, about 20 miles from Lystra. Kiepert places it near Lake Ak-Ghieul, but some modern missionaries place it at Divlé, several miles farther south.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Derbe
City of Lycaonia, in Asia Minor, visited by Paul and Barnabas. Acts 14:6,20 ; Acts 16:1 ; Acts 20:4 . It is twice mentioned with Lystra, and is placed on the maps to the east of that city. It has recently been identified with Ambarrarasi, west of Eregli.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Derbe
A small town of Lycaonia, in Asia Minor, to which Paul and Barnabas fled from Lystra, A. D. 41, Acts 14:20 . It lay at the foot of the Taurus mountains on the north, sixteen or twenty miles east of Lystra. The two missionaries gained many disciples here, and among them perhaps Gaius, who afterwards labored with Paul, Acts 14:20 ; 20:4 .

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Derbe
DERBE . A city in the ethnic district Lycaonia, and in the region Lycaonia-Galatica of the Roman province Galatia, on the main road from Iconium (or Lystra) S.E. to Laranda. The modern villages Losta and Gudelissin are built on the ruins of the city or its territory. Amyntas, king of Galatia, had conquered it, and in b.c. 25 it passed with the rest of his territory into the hands of the Romans. From a.d. 41 to 72 it was the frontier city of the province, and was honoured with the prefix Claudio . It was in this period that St. Paul visited it ( Acts 14:6 ), and then retraced his steps to Lystra, etc. On his second journey, coming from Cilicia, he reached it first and then went on to Lystra, as he did also on the third journey. Gaius of Derbe was one of the representatives of Galatia in the deputation which carried the collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem ( Acts 20:4 ). Derbe was on the whole one of the least important places visited by St. Paul, and appears little in history.

A. Souter.

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Derbe
Originally Derbe was part of the ancient kingdom of Lycaonia, but when Rome redivided Asia Minor, Derbe became part of the Roman province of Galatia (Acts 14:6; see GALATIA; LYCAONIA). Paul and Barnabas established a church in Derbe on their first missionary journey (Acts 14:20-21), and Paul visited the church on his second and third journeys (Acts 16:1; Acts 18:23). It was one of the churches that Paul wrote to in his letter to the Galatians.

Sentence search

Derbe - The residents of Derbe and Lystra spoke a different language from the people to the north in Iconium. Paul visited Derbe on his first missionary journey (Acts 14:6 ), fleeing from Iconium. Persecution in Lystra led to a successful preaching mission in Derbe (Acts 14:20-21 ). On the second journey, Paul returned to Derbe (Acts 16:1 ). Paul's fellow minister Gaius was from Derbe (Acts 20:4 )
Derbe - Originally Derbe was part of the ancient kingdom of Lycaonia, but when Rome redivided Asia Minor, Derbe became part of the Roman province of Galatia (Acts 14:6; see GALATIA; LYCAONIA). Paul and Barnabas established a church in Derbe on their first missionary journey (Acts 14:20-21), and Paul visited the church on his second and third journeys (Acts 16:1; Acts 18:23)
Lycaonia - District nearly in the centre of Asia Minor, in which were Lystra, Derbe, and Iconium
Derbe - (Δέρβη)... Derbe was one of ‘the cities of Lycaonia’ into which Paul and Barnabas fled when driven from Iconium (Acts 14:6). ), who added Laranda and Derbe to the extensive territories which he ruled as a Roman subject-king. Derbe, however, being required as a fortress city on the Roman frontier, was detached from the Strategia and included in the province of Galatia, after which it received a new constitution, and was named Claudio-Derbe, which was equivalent to Imperial Derbe. Derbe lay on the great trade-route between Ephesus and Syrian Antioch. Paul’s first visit to Derbe was very successful; he ‘made many disciples’ (Acts 14:21), and the city is not mentioned as one of the places in which he was persecuted (2 Timothy 3:11). It is a striking fact that he made Derbe the last stage of his missionary progress, instead of going on to the neighbouring and greater city of Laranda. Because Derbe was the limit of Roman territory, he made it the limit of his mission. In his second journey he evidently crossed the Taurus by the Cilician Gates, passed through the kingdom of Antiochus, and so ‘came to Derbe and Lystra’ (Acts 15:41; Acts 16:1). On the Southern Galatian theory, the Christians of Derbe formed one of the ‘churches of Galatia’ (1 Corinthians 16:1, Galatians 1:2), and they were among the ἀνόητοι Γαλάται (Galatians 3:1) whom he exhorted to stand fast in their Christian liberty (Galatians 5:1). Imperial Derbe stood in closer relations with the Roman colonies of Antioch and Lystra than with the non-Roman Lycaones of the kingdom of Antiochus. 23) placed Derbe between the villages of Zosta and Bossola on the road from Konia to Laranda
Lycaonia - (lihc ay oh' ni uh) Roman province in the interior of Asia Minor including cities of Lystra, Iconium, and Derbe
Derbe - Paul passed through Derbe on his route from Cilicia to Iconium, on his second missionary journey (Acts 16:1 ), and probably also on his third journey (18:23; 19:1). On his first journey (14:20,21) he came to Derbe from the other side; i
Gaius - He was perhaps the same as ‘Gaius of Derbe’ who accompanied the Apostle from Greece to Asia ( Acts 20:4 ); if so, he would be a native of Derbe, but a dweller at Corinth
Derbe - Derbe . Gaius of Derbe was one of the representatives of Galatia in the deputation which carried the collection for the poor Christians in Jerusalem ( Acts 20:4 ). Derbe was on the whole one of the least important places visited by St
Derbe - Derbe (der'be)
Derbe - In enumerating places (2 Timothy 3:11) he mentions Lystra but not Derbe, though in the independent history they are mentioned together: a delicate instance of accuracy, for he is here enumerating only those places where he suffered persecution. Gaius or Caius belonged to Derbe, Paul's companion in travel (Acts 20:4)
Lycaonia - It was a Roman province, and its chief towns were Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe
Lycaonia - Its chief towns were Iconium, Derbe, and Lystra
Lycaonia - In it were the cities of Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, mentioned in the travels of St
John, Third Epistle of - Is addressed to Caius, or Gaius, but whether to the Christian of that name in Macedonia (Acts 19 :: 29 ) or in Corinth (Romans 16:23 ) or in Derbe (Acts 20:4 ) is uncertain
Lycaonia - Of its cities, Iconium, Derbe, and Lystra and mentioned in the New Testament, Acts 14:6
Gaius - A Gaius of Macedonia is mentioned in Acts 19:29, and a Gaius of Derbe (Acts 20:4); probably distinct men
Gaius - Convert of Derbe in Lycaonia, and companion of Paul
Gaius - The association of his name with that of Aristarchus seems to identify him with the Gaius of Derbe
Gaius - ... ... A man of Derbe who accompanied Paul into Asia on his last journey to Jerusalem ... ... A Christain of Asia Minor to whom John addressed his third epistle (3 John 1:1 )
Gaius - A Christian from Derbe who accompanied Paul the apostle into Asia (Acts 20:4 )
Gai'us - ) ... Of Derbe
Lycaonia - Paul established churches in the Lycaonian towns of Lystra and Derbe, and these were among the churches that he addressed in his letter to the Galatians (Acts 14:6)
Gaius or Caius - Of Derbe; an attendant of Paul from Corinth, in his last journey to Jerusalem, Acts 20:4
Gaius - Another person named Gaius was from Macedonia (Acts 19:29) and another from Derbe (Acts 20:4)
Iconium - " An assault of Jews and Gentiles with their rulers, to stone them, being threatened, they withdrew to Lystra and Derbe in the eastern and wilder parts of Lycaonia. "... On his second missionary circuit Paul with Silas came from Syrian Antioch through Cilicia, and up through the Taurus passes into Lycaonia, and by Derbe and Lystra proceeded westward to Iconium (Acts 16:1-3)
Lycao'Nia - "Cappadocia is on the east, Galatia on the north, Phrygia on the west and Cilicia on the south "Among its chief cities are Derbe, Lystra and Iconium
Lycaonia - Lycaonia belonged to the empire of the Seleucids, who more or less hellenized its larger towns, such as Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe. Soon afterwards this brilliant soldier-the most interesting of Asiatic Gaels-overthrew Antipater of Derbe, with the result that the whole of Lycaonia, except the so-called Eleventh Strategia (which about this time was given to King Antiochus of Commagene, to be henceforth called Lycaonia Antiochiana) was now included in the Galatian realm. On reaching the frontier city of Derbe, he retraced his steps
Lycaonia - toward Antioch in Pisidia; Derbe was on the E
Lycaonia - ) Amyntas conquered Derbe and Laranda, which were incorporated in the Roman Empire when Amyntas’ kingdom was made into the province Galatia in b. The former part included Lystra and Derbe and a number of smaller places, and it is correctly described in Acts 14:6
Gaius - He is described as ‘of Derbe’ (Δερβαῖος), possibly intentionally to distinguish him from 3. Emendations of the text have been suggested by which ‘of Derbe’ is taken with ‘Timothy,’ but these are purely conjectural, and Timothy was apparently a Lystran (Acts 16:1-2)
Galatia - (The effect of taking ‘Galatia’ in the other sense would be to leave out certain Pauline churches, Derbe, Lystra, Iconium, and Pisidian Antioch, and perhaps these alone, in all that vast region: which is absurd. Paul and his companions to go to after Derbe and Lystra. ‘The Galatian region,’ then, will cover Derbe and Lystra; ‘Phrygia’ will include Iconium and Pisidian Antioch. We conclude then that, whether any other churches are comprised in the address of the Epistle to the Galatians or not, and a negative answer is probably correct, the churches of Derbe, Lystra, Iconium, and Pisidian Antioch are included
Trophimus - Paul in Macedonia and accompanied him to Asia, and thence preceded him to Troas, where they were joined by the delegates from the other churches-Sopater of Berœa, Aristarchus and Secundus from Thessalonica, Gaius of Derbe, and Timothy
Aristarchus - ] ), probably of Derbe, he was rushed by the excited multitude into the theatre (Acts 19:29)
Timothy - He was of Derbe or Lystra, both cities of Lycaonia, Acts 16:1 14:6
Asia Minor, Cities of - Cities of Asia Minor important to the New Testament accounts included Alexandria Troas, Assos, Ephesus, Miletus, Patara, Smyrna, Pergamum, Sardis, Thyatira, Philadelphia, Laodicea, Colassae, Attalia, Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, Derbe, and Tarsus. ... Derbe was situated 60 miles from Lystra at the present-day site of Kerti Huyuk. Although a large city of Lyconia, Derbe was relatively unimportant. It is possible that some believers had already advanced the Gospel to Derbe, having been earlier expelled from Iconium
Iconium, - In the time of the Emperor Claudius, it, along with Derbe, received the honorary prefix Claudio-, becoming Claudiconium (compare our Royal Burghs), but it was not till Hadrian’s time (a
Galatians, Letter to the - Paul established churches in the Galatian towns of Antioch, Iconium, Lystra and Derbe (Acts 13:13-52; Acts 14:1-23), then returned to his base in Antioch in Syria (Acts 14:26-28)
Galatia - Having overthrown Antipater the robber-chief, he added Derbe and Laranda to his dominions, but lost his life in an attempt to subdue the Homanades of Isauria. Galatia proper (the country of the three Galatian tribes), part of Phrygia (including Antioch and Iconium), Pisidia, Isauria, and part of Lycaonia (with Lystra and Derbe). 41 by the gift of a slice or Lycaonia, including Laranda, to Antiochus of Commagene (called after him Lycaonia Antiochiana), so that Derbe became the frontier town and Customs’ station. ] ) were made Roman colonies by Augustus; Iconium and Derbe (qq. ] ) were remodelled in Roman style by Claudius, and named Claud-Iconium and Claudio-Derbe. 1 Corinthians 16:1) to be sought in the comparatively small district occupied by the Gauls, about Ancyra, Pessinus, and Tavium, or in the great Roman province of Galatia, which included Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe? In the absence of definite information, we have to make probability our guide, and to the present writer the balance of evidence appears to favour the South Galatian hypothesis. Paul’s first mission north of Taurus was conducted in the Greek-speaking cities of Antioch and Iconium (which were Phrygian), Lystra and Derbe (which were Lycaonian)-all in the Provincia Galatia, but far from Galatia proper
Galatians, Epistle to the - Galatia, however, was also the name of the Roman province embracing Galatia Proper and the region to the south of it in which were Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, the cities evangelized by Paul on his first missionary journey; many hold that the epistle was addressed to these southern churches
Epistle to the Galatians - Galatia, however, was also the name of the Roman province embracing Galatia Proper and the region to the south of it in which were Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, the cities evangelized by Paul on his first missionary journey; many hold that the epistle was addressed to these southern churches
Barnabas - ... Here the Jews stirred up a sedition, and obliged them to retire to Derbe and Lystra, in Lycaonia, where St
Galatians, Epistle to the - ), or the inhabitants of Pisidian Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, which lay in the S. Paul comes from Syro-Cilicia to Derbe and Lystra, no doubt by land, through the Cilician Gates [Derbe being mentioned first as being reached first, while in Acts 14:6 Lystra was reached first and mentioned first], and then ‘they went through ( v. Paul comes, probably, by the same land route as before, and to the same district; yet now Derbe and Lystra are not mentioned by name. the region round Derbe and Lystra
Phrygia - Paul (now accompanied by Silas) began with the churches of Cilicia and then passed through Derbe and Lystra, where he took Timothy into his company
Paul - ... Paul's convention... Sojourn in Arabia... 37-40... First journey to Jerusalem after his conversion, Galatians 1:18; sojourn at Tarsus, ana afterward at Antioch, Acts 11:26... Second journey to Jerusalem, in company with Barnabas, to relieve the famine... Paul's first great missionary journey, with Barnabas and Mark; Cyprus, Antioch in Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, Derbe; return to Antioch in Syria
Iconium - In the interval between the Apostle’s last two visits, he received the alarming tidings that his Galatian churches-which, on this hypothesis, were Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe-were being perverted by Judaizers, whoso fatal errors his Epistle to the Galatians was immediately written to confute
Galatians, Letter to the - ” In Acts 13:14-14:24 (first missionary journey) Paul founded churches at Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, cities in the southern part of the Roman province. Paul visited Lystra and Derbe again in Acts 16:1-6 (second missionary journey)
Timothy - He apparently first came in contact with Paul when Paul moved through the Galatian towns of Antioch, Iconium, Lystra and Derbe on his first missionary journey (2 Timothy 3:10-11; cf. ... 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
Tim'Othy - The language of the Acts leaves it uncertain whether Lystra or Derbe was the residence of the devout family
Roads And Travel - to Derbe. Paul and Barnabas from Derbe to Attaleia (Acts 14:21-25) was the same as the outgoing. On reaching the northern side of this great mountain range the travellers went by Podandos, Loulon, Halala, (the later Colonia Faustiniana, Faustinopolis), Kybistra, and Laranda to Derbe. From Derbe they travelled by their old route to Lystra, Iconium, and ‘Pisidian’ Antioch
Chronology of the New Testament - First Missionary Journey, to Cyprus, Acts 13:4 ; Pamphylia, and Southern Galatia (Pisidian Antioch, Acts 13:14 ; Iconium, Acts 13:51 ; Lystra, Acts 14:6 ; Derbe, Acts 14:20 ), and back by Attalia to Antioch, Acts 14:26 [so HR; TL give one year less]. Second Missionary Journey, from Antioch through Syria-Cilicia to Derbe and Lystra, Acts 15:41 ; Acts 16:1 ; through the ‘Phrygo-Galatic’ region of the province Galatia to Troas, Acts 16:6-8 ; to Macedonia, Acts 16:11 ; Athens, Acts 17:15 ; and Corinth, Acts 18:1 , where 18 months are spent; thence by sea to Ephesus, Acts 18:19 ; Jerusalem (fourth visit), Acts 18:22 ; and Antioch, where ‘some time’ is spent, Acts 18:23
Tarsus - At the beginning of his second missionary tour he was again in Cilicia, confirming the churches which he had probably founded (Acts 15:41), and he could not avoid Tarsus on his way through the Cilician Gates to Derbe and Lystra (Acts 16:1)
Timothy - -Assuming that 2 Timothy contains reliable historical data, it seems probable that Timothy was born at Derbe or Lystra, his father being a Greek, his mother Eunice a Christian Jewess
Timothy - First mentioned (Acts 16:1) as dwelling in Lystra (not Derbe, Acts 20:4; compare 2 Timothy 3:11)
Paul - Paul and Barnabas now travelled on to Iconium where the occurrences at Antioch were repeated, and from thence to the Lycaonian country which contained the cities Lystra and Derbe. The next day he left it with Barnabas, and went to Derbe, and thence they returned once more to Lystra, and so to Iconium and Antioch. The two went together through Syria and Cilicia, visiting the churches, and so came to Derbe and Lystra
Paul - But persecution drove them thence, and they fled to Lystra and Derbe of Lycaonia. But he arose and went into the city, and next day to Derbe and to Lystra again, and to Iconium and Antioch, ordaining elders in every church, and confirming the disciples by telling them "that we must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God
Stoning - The injuries sustained were not sufficiently serious to prevent his leaving Lystra for Derbe next day
Paul - 45, and preached the Gospel successively at Salamis and Paphos, two cities of the isle of Cyprus, at Perga in Pamphylia, Antioch in Pisidia, and at Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, three cities of Lycaonia. They travelled through Syria and Cilicia, confirming the churches, and then came to Derbe and Lystra, Acts 16
Paul - The towns mentioned in this tour are the Pisidian Antioch, where Paul delivered his first address of which we have any record (13:16-51; comp 10:30-43), Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe
Peter, the Epistles of - In Lycaonia were the churches of Iconium, founded by Paul and Barnabas; of Lystra, Timothy's birthplace, where Paul was stoned; and of Derbe, the birthplace of Gains or Caius
Paul - Entering the highlands, they came into the province of Galatia where they concentrated their efforts in the southern cities of Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe
John, Epistles of - Romans 16:23 ); Gaius of Derbe ( Acts 20:4 ); and Galus of Macedonia ( Acts 19:29 )
Paul - But, if its recipients were the churches of Antioch-in-Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, evangelized during the first missionary journey, and if the visit to Jerusalem mentioned in Galatians 2 be identified with a visit to Jerusalem preceding the Council held there-these two being the conclusions of what is called the South Galatian theory (see below)-it seems a natural inference that the Epistle was written before the commencement of the second missionary journey and before the Council of Jerusalem