Places Study on Elam

Places Study on Elam

Genesis 10: The children of Shem; Elam, and Asshur, and Arphaxad, and Lud, and Aram.
Genesis 14: And it came to pass in the days of Amraphel king of Shinar, Arioch king of Ellasar, Chedorlaomer king of Elam, and Tidal king of nations;
Genesis 14: With Chedorlaomer the king of Elam, and with Tidal king of nations, and Amraphel king of Shinar, and Arioch king of Ellasar; four kings with five.
2 Samuel 10: And Hadarezer sent, and brought out the Syrians that were beyond the river: and they came to Helam; and Shobach the captain of the host of Hadarezer went before them.
2 Samuel 10: And when it was told David, he gathered all Israel together, and passed over Jordan, and came to Helam. And the Syrians set themselves in array against David, and fought with him.
1 Chronicles 1: The sons of Shem; Elam, and Asshur, and Arphaxad, and Lud, and Aram, and Uz, and Hul, and Gether, and Meshech.
1 Chronicles 8: And Hananiah, and Elam, and Antothijah,
1 Chronicles 26: Elam the fifth, Jehohanan the sixth, Elioenai the seventh.
Ezra 2: The children of Elam, a thousand two hundred fifty and four.
Ezra 2: The children of the other Elam, a thousand two hundred fifty and four.
Ezra 4: Then wrote Rehum the chancellor, and Shimshai the scribe, and the rest of their companions; the Dinaites, the Apharsathchites, the Tarpelites, the Apharsites, the Archevites, the Babylonians, the Susanchites, the Dehavites, and the Elamites,
Ezra 8: And of the sons of Elam; Jeshaiah the son of Athaliah, and with him seventy males.
Ezra 10: And Shechaniah the son of Jehiel, one of the sons of Elam, answered and said unto Ezra, We have trespassed against our God, and have taken strange wives of the people of the land: yet now there is hope in Israel concerning this thing.
Ezra 10: And of the sons of Elam; Mattaniah, Zechariah, and Jehiel, and Abdi, and Jeremoth, and Eliah.
Nehemiah 7: The children of Elam, a thousand two hundred fifty and four.
Nehemiah 7: The children of the other Elam, a thousand two hundred fifty and four.
Nehemiah 10: The chief of the people; Parosh, Pahathmoab, Elam, Zatthu, Bani,
Nehemiah 12: And Maaseiah, and Shemaiah, and Eleazar, and Uzzi, and Jehohanan, and Malchijah, and Elam, and Ezer. And the singers sang loud, with Jezrahiah their overseer.
Isaiah 11: And it shall come to pass in that day, that the Lord shall set his hand again the second time to recover the remnant of his people, which shall be left, from Assyria, and from Egypt, and from Pathros, and from Cush, and from Elam, and from Shinar, and from Hamath, and from the islands of the sea.
Isaiah 21: A grievous vision is declared unto me; the treacherous dealer dealeth treacherously, and the spoiler spoileth. Go up, O Elam: besiege, O Media; all the sighing thereof have I made to cease.
Isaiah 22: And Elam bare the quiver with chariots of men and horsemen, and Kir uncovered the shield.
Jeremiah 25: And all the kings of Zimri, and all the kings of Elam, and all the kings of the Medes,
Jeremiah 29: Thus shalt thou also speak to Shemaiah the Nehelamite, saying,
Jeremiah 29: Send to all them of the captivity, saying, Thus saith the LORD concerning Shemaiah the Nehelamite; Because that Shemaiah hath prophesied unto you, and I sent him not, and he caused you to trust in a lie:
Jeremiah 29: Therefore thus saith the LORD; Behold, I will punish Shemaiah the Nehelamite, and his seed: he shall not have a man to dwell among this people; neither shall he behold the good that I will do for my people, saith the LORD; because he hath taught rebellion against the LORD.
Jeremiah 49: The word of the LORD that came to Jeremiah the prophet against Elam in the beginning of the reign of Zedekiah king of Judah, saying,
Jeremiah 49: Thus saith the LORD of hosts; Behold, I will break the bow of Elam, the chief of their might.
Jeremiah 49: And upon Elam will I bring the four winds from the four quarters of heaven, and will scatter them toward all those winds; and there shall be no nation whither the outcasts of Elam shall not come.
Jeremiah 49: For I will cause Elam to be dismayed before their enemies, and before them that seek their life: and I will bring evil upon them, even my fierce anger, saith the LORD; and I will send the sword after them, till I have consumed them:
Jeremiah 49: And I will set my throne in Elam, and will destroy from thence the king and the princes, saith the LORD.
Jeremiah 49: But it shall come to pass in the latter days, that I will bring again the captivity of Elam, saith the LORD.
Ezekiel 32: There is Elam and all her multitude round about her grave, all of them slain, fallen by the sword, which are gone down uncircumcised into the nether parts of the earth, which caused their terror in the land of the living; yet have they borne their shame with them that go down to the pit.
Daniel 8: And I saw in a vision; and it came to pass, when I saw, that I was at Shushan in the palace, which is in the province of Elam; and I saw in a vision, and I was by the river of Ulai.
Acts 2: Parthians, and Medes, and Elamites, and the dwellers in Mesopotamia, and in Judaea, and Cappadocia, in Pontus, and Asia,

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Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Elam
Highland, the son of Shem (Genesis 10:22 ), and the name of the country inhabited by his descendants (14:1,9; Isaiah 11:11 ; 21:2 , etc.) lying to the east of Babylonia, and extending to the shore of the Mediterranean, a distance in a direct line of about 1,000 miles. The name Elam is an Assyrian word meaning "high." "The inhabitants of Elam, or 'the Highlands,' to the east of Babylon, were called Elamites. They were divided into several branches, speaking different dialects of the same agglutinative language. The race to which they belonged was brachycephalic, or short-headed, like the pre-Semitic Sumerians of Babylonia.

"The earliest Elamite kingdom seems to have been that of Anzan, the exact site of which is uncertain; but in the time of Abraham, Shushan or Susa appears to have already become the capital of the country. Babylonia was frequently invaded by the Elamite kings, who at times asserted their supremacy over it (as in the case of Chedorlaomer, the Kudur-Lagamar, or 'servant of the goddess Lagamar,' of the cuneiform texts).

"The later Assyrian monarchs made several campaigns against Elam, and finally Assur-bani-pal (about B.C. 650) succeeded in conquering the country, which was ravaged with fire and sword. On the fall of the Assyrian Empire, Elam passed into the hands of the Persians" (A.H. Sayce).

This country was called by the Greeks Cissia or Susiana.



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Elam
1. Son of Shem (Genesis 10:22). The name is Semitic. The Elamites gave their name to Elymais, the region on the left or E. bank of the Tigris, opposite Babylonia, between it on the W. and Persia proper on the E., and S.W. of Media. The region is also named Susiana or Susis from its capital Susa, called Shushah in Daniel 8:2, where Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1:1) waited on king Artaxerxes, and where Ahasuerus (Xerxes) held his court in Esther's (Esther 1:2; Esther 2:5) time. Daniel mentions the river Ulai near, i.e. the Greek Euloeus. From Darius Hystaspes' time to Alexander the Great it was the Persian king's court residence. Chedorlaomer who invaded Palestine in Abraham's time (Genesis 14) was king of Elam, and then lord paramount over Amraphel, king of Shinar (Babylonia) on its confines. (See CHEDORLAOMER.)

This Elamitic supremacy was of short duration. The Kissinns or Cossaeans (Cushites?) subsequently to the Elamites subjugated Elam and called it Kissia (Herodotus, 3:91; 5:49). The Greek traditions of Memnon and his Ethiopian bands rest on this subjugation, the Kissians of Elam being connected with the Cushite inhabitants of the upper valley of the Nile. The two races remained separate to the time Of Strabo (compare Ezra 4:9). Discoveries in Elam prove Susa one of the oldest cities in the East and its monarchs quasiindependent, while acknowledging Assyria's and Babylon's successive supremacy. Occasionally, for a time, it maintained its complete independence. It was a province of Babylonia from Nebuchadnezzar's time (Daniel 8:2). Its conquest by him is probably foretold in Jeremiah 49:30-34; Ezekiel 32:24-25. It had helped him against Judaea; hence God dealt retributively its punishment by him with whom it bad transgressed.

Its bowmen were famed (Isaiah 22:6); so God says, "I will break the bow of Elam." After scattering them God saith, "in the latter days I will bring again the captivity of Elam," namely, in the coming restitution of all things by Messiah, an earnest of which was given in that Elamites were on Pentecost among the first who heard and accepted the gospel (Acts 2:9). Elam took part in destroying Babylon, on Cyrus' advance probably joining him in the assault (Isaiah 21:2). Elam became a satrapy of the Persian empire, furnishing 300 talents as annual tribute (Herodotus, 3:91). Susa, its capital, became capital of the empire and the court residence. Nevertheless it was the scene of the Magian revolution, and twice revolted under Darius Hystaspes (Behistun Inscription).

2. A Korhite Levite, one of the sons of Asaph in David's time (1 Chronicles 26:3).

3. A Benjamite chief, one of Shashak's sons (1 Chronicles 8:24).

4. Children of Elam, 1,254, returned with Zerubbabel from Babylon (Ezra 2:7; Nehemiah 7:12). Seventy-one more accompanied Ezra and the second caravan (Ezra 8:7). Shechaniah, one of them, seconded Ezra's confession of sin, especially as to marriages with aliens, pleaded the people's guilt, and proposed a covenant to put away those wives; six of the sons of Elam accordingly did so (Ezra 10:2; Ezra 10:26).

5. Another Elam, of whose sons also the same number returned, is mentioned (Ezra 2:31; Nehemiah 7:34).

6. A priest who accompanied Nehemiah in dedicating the wall (Nehemiah 12:42).

Holman Bible Dictionary - Elam
(ee' lam) A personal name and a place name 1. Elam was a son of Shem, one of the sons of Noah (Genesis 10:22 ; 1 Chronicles 1:17 ). He may have given his name to the region known as Elam. 2. The region of Elam is on the western edge of ancient Persia, modern Iran. The Zagros Mountains lie east and north while the Persian Gulf is to the south and the Tigris River is on the west. The ancient capital of the area is Susa. The region has been inhabited since before 3000 B.C., but only a few of the periods are of importance for biblical history.

Elam appeared in history when Sargon of Akkad subdued it about 2300 B.C. Soon, though, Elamites reversed the role, sacked Ur, and set up an Elamite king in Eshnunna. The Elamite presence continued in Babylon until the time of Hammurabi about 1700 B.C.

After Hammurabi, Kassites invaded Elam. Their rule lasted until about 1200 B.C. The next century was the high point of Elam's power. All of western Iran was theirs. Again the Babylonians brought Elamite power to an end. The Assyrian Ashurbanipal brought an end to the periods of strength and weakness. He swept through the region in a series of campaigns and captured Susa in 641 B.C. He may have moved some Elamites to Samaria at that time (Ezra 4:9 ). Earlier, Elam had incorporated Anshan, later home of Cyrus the Great, into the kingdom. As Assyria weakened, Elam and Anshan became part of the kingdom of the Medes. Thus, they participated, with the Babylonians, in the defeat of the Assyrian empire. Elam had little subsequent independent history, but it continued to be part of the Medes' and the Persians' empires. In Scripture Elam's importance may have been due to its role as a vassal of the great empires, supplying troops for them.

Elam is mentioned in Scripture in narratives and oracles. Abraham fought Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, to secure the return of Lot and others (Genesis 14:1 ). Although this king cannot be identified from other records, the events may have occurred during Elam's time of strength prior to Hammurabi. Prophets mentioned Elam in oracles. Isaiah's word of hope included the promise God would recover His people from Elam (Isaiah 11:11 ). In Isaiah 21:2 ; Isaiah 22:6 the prophet referred to Elam's military power. He called Elam to attack Babylon in Isaiah 21:1 . The second mention seems to refer to Elam as part of God's judgment on Judah. Jeremiah 25:25 includes Elam as a kingdom which must drink the cup of God's wrath. Later this same prophet ( Jeremiah 49:34-39 ), in the days of Zedekiah, pronounced judgment on Elam. No explanation for the judgment is given; but Elam, as a vassal of Babylon, may have participated in the attack on Jerusalem. Still, there is a word of hope in the end (Jeremiah 49:39 ). Ezekiel pictured Elam in the pit (Sheol) where it experienced shame and punishment for its destructive ways (Ezekiel 32:24 ).

Other biblical references mention Elam as a personal name or homeland. Perhaps most interesting is the presence of men from Elam on the day of Pentecost. These may have been Jews from the region of Elam or converts to Judaism (Acts 2:9 ). God was still gathering His people from there. See Persia ; Cyrus ; Assyria.

3. A clan head of tribe of Benjamin living in Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 8:24 ). 4 . A priestly gatekeeper under David (1 Chronicles 26:3 ). 5 . Two clan leaders among the exiles who returned to Jerusalem with Zerubbabel in 537 B.C. (Ezra 2:7 ,Ezra 2:7,2:31 ). Compare Ezra 8:7 ; Ezra 10:2 , Ezra 10:26 . 6 . A post-exilic leader who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God (Nehemiah 10:14 ). 7 . A priest who helped Nehemiah lead the people in celebrating the completion of the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 12:42 ).

Albert F. Bean



Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Elam
the eldest son of Shem, who settled in a country to which he gave his name, Genesis 10:22 . It is frequently mentioned in Scripture, as lying to the south-east of Shinar. Susiana, in later times, seems to have been a part of this country, Daniel 8:2 ; and before the captivity the Jews seem always to have intended Persia by the name of Elam. Stephanus takes it to be a part of Assyria, but Pliny and Josephus, more properly, of Persia, whose inhabitants, this latter tells us, sprung from the Elamites.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Elam
Elam (ç'lam). 1. A country peopled by the descendants of Shem, and called, after his son, Elam. Genesis 10:22. It lay south of Assyria and west of Persia proper, and reached to the Persian Gulf. Herodotus called it Cissia. It was a province of Persia, of which Susa was capital. Ezra 4:9; Daniel 8:2. Elam was a strong power in Abram's time. Genesis 14:9. Its people aided in the destruction of Babylon, Isaiah 21:2; invaded Israel, 22:6. Its destruction was foretold. Jeremiah 49:34-39; Jeremiah 25:25; Ezekiel 32:24-25. A remarkable statement illustrating the truth of the Scriptures in respect to Elam has been deciphered from Assyrian cylinders in the British Museum. 2. The name of six persons in the Old Testament.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Elam
1. The region afterwards called Persia, Genesis 14:1 . It was called Elam after a son of Shem, Genesis 10:22 . It corresponded to the Elymais of Greek and Roman writers, which comprehended a part of Susiana, now Khusistan or more probably included the whole of Susiana. The city Susa, or Shushan, was in it, Daniel 8:2 . See also Acts 2:9 .

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Elam
A young man; a virgin; a secret
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Elam
ELAM . 1. A son of Shem ( Genesis 10:22 = 1 Chronicles 1:17 ), the eponymous ancestor of the Elamites (see following article). 2. A Korabite ( 1 Chronicles 26:3 ). 3. A Benjamite ( 1 Chronicles 8:24 ). 4. The eponym of a family of which 1254 returned with Zerub. ( Ezra 2:7 , Nehemiah 7:12 , 1E Esther 5:12 ) and 71 with Ezra ( Ezra 8:7 , 1Es 8:33 ). It was one of the Benê-Elam that urged Ezra to take action against mixed marriages ( Ezra 10:2 ), and six of the same family are reported to have put away their foreign wives ( Ezra 10:26 ). Elam acc. to Nehemiah 10:14 ‘sealed the covenant.’ 5. In the parallel lists Ezra 2:31 , Nehemiah 7:34 ‘the other Elam’ has also 1254 descendants who return with Zerubbabel. 6. A priest who took part in the dedication of the walls ( Nehemiah 12:42 ).

ELAM . An important country of Western Asia, called Elamtu by the Babylonians and Elymais by the Greeks (also Susiana , from Shushan or Susa the capital). It corresponds nearly to the modern Chuzistan , lying to the east of the lower Tigris , but including also the mountains that skirt the plain. The portion south of Susa was known as Anshan (Anzan). In Genesis 10:22 ( 1 Chronicles 1:17 ) Elam is called a son of Shem, from the mistaken idea that the people were of the Semitic race. They belonged to the great family of barbarous or semi-barbarous tribes which occupied the highlands to the east and north of the Semites before the influx of the Aryans.

Historically Elam’s most important place in the Bible is found in Genesis 14:1 ff., where it is mentioned as the suzerain of Babylonia and therewith of the whole western country including Palestine. The period there alluded to was that of Elam’s greatest power, a little later than b.c. 2300. For many centuries previous, Elam had upon the whole been subordinate to the ruling power of Babylonia, no matter which of the great cities west of the Tigris happened to be supreme. Not many years later, Hammurabi of Babylon (perhaps the Amraphel of Genesis 14:1-24 ) threw off the yoke of Elam, which henceforth held an inferior place. Wars between the two countries were, however, very common, and Elam frequently had the advantage. The splendidly defensible position of the capital contributed greatly to its independence and recuperative power, and thus Susa became a repository of much valuable spoil secured from the Babylonian cities. This explains how it came about that the Code of Hammurabi, the most important single monument of Oriental antiquity, was found in the ruins of Susa. A change in relations gradually took place after Assyria began to control Babylonia and thus encroach upon Elam, which was thenceforth, as a rule, in league with the patriotic Babylonians, especially with the Chaldæans from the south-land. Interesting and tragic is the story of the combined efforts of the Chaldæans and Elamites to repel the invaders. The last scene of the drama was the capture and sack of Susa ( c [Note: circa, about.] . b.c. 645). The conqueror Ashurbanipal (Bibl. Osnappar ) completed the subjugation of Elam by deporting many of its inhabitants, among the exiles being a detachment sent to the province of Samaria ( Ezra 4:9 ). Shortly thereafter, when Assyria itself declined and fell, Elam was occupied by the rising Aryan tribes, the Medes from the north and the Persians from the south. Cyrus the Persian (born about b.c. 590) was the fourth hereditary prince of Anshan.

Elam has a somewhat prominent place in the prophetic writings, in which Media + Elam = Persian empire. See esp. Isaiah 21:2 ff., Jeremiah 49:34 ff., and cf. Isaiah 22:6 , Jeremiah 25:25 , Ezekiel 32:24 . Particular interest attached to the part taken by the Elamites in the overthrow of Babylonia. An effect of this participation is curiously shown in the fact that after the Exile, Elam was a fairly common name among the Jews themselves ( Ezra 2:7 ; Ezra 2:31 , Nehemiah 7:12 , 1 Chronicles 8:24 et al. ).

J. F. McCurdy.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Elam
1. Son of Shem. He settled in a highland district east of Babylonia, which became the seat of a powerful monarchy. The district was also called ELAM. Genesis 10:22 ; 1 Chronicles 1:17 . In the days of Abraham Chedorlaomer king of Elam was able to make war as far off as the Dead Sea. Genesis 14:1,9 . It subsequently became subject to the great power of the Chaldeans and Assyrians. When Assyria declined, Elam was conquered by its Persian neighbours, and reigned over by the Achaemenian Dynasty. Cyrus was king of Anshan, or Anzan (Elam) as well as of Persia: hence the close connection, and almost identification of Elam with Persia. In scripture Elam often designates Persia. In Isaiah 21:2-10 Elam and Media were to destroy Babylon. It afterwards became a part of the Medo-Persian empire. Daniel was at Shushan, which was in the province of Elam. Under the name of Susiana, Elam is represented by the historians as one of the most ancient regions of the East. There are many prophecies against it. Isaiah 11:11 ; Isaiah 21:2 ; Isaiah 22:6 ; Jeremiah 25:25 ; Jeremiah 49:34-39 ; Ezekiel 32:24 ; Daniel 8:2 .

2. Son of Shashak, a Benjamite. 1 Chronicles 8:24 .

3. Son of Meshelemiah, a Korhite. 1 Chronicles 26:3 .

4. chief of the people who sealed the covenant. Nehemiah 10:14 .

5. One whose descendants had married strange wives. Ezra, 10:2,26

6. A priest who took part in the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem. Nehemiah 12:42 .

7, etc. Two or more whose descendants returned from exile. Ezra 2:7,31 ; Ezra 8:7 ; Nehemiah 7:12,34 .

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Elam
Elam was an ancient kingdom north of the Persian Gulf in the region of Mesopotamia. Later it became part of Persia, and its name was sometimes used as another name for Persia. For details see PERSIA.

Sentence search

Elam - Elam was a son of Shem, one of the sons of Noah (Genesis 10:22 ; 1 Chronicles 1:17 ). He may have given his name to the region known as Elam. The region of Elam is on the western edge of ancient Persia, modern Iran. ... Elam appeared in history when Sargon of Akkad subdued it about 2300 B. Soon, though, Elamites reversed the role, sacked Ur, and set up an Elamite king in Eshnunna. The Elamite presence continued in Babylon until the time of Hammurabi about 1700 B. ... After Hammurabi, Kassites invaded Elam. The next century was the high point of Elam's power. Again the Babylonians brought Elamite power to an end. He may have moved some Elamites to Samaria at that time (Ezra 4:9 ). Earlier, Elam had incorporated Anshan, later home of Cyrus the Great, into the kingdom. As Assyria weakened, Elam and Anshan became part of the kingdom of the Medes. Elam had little subsequent independent history, but it continued to be part of the Medes' and the Persians' empires. In Scripture Elam's importance may have been due to its role as a vassal of the great empires, supplying troops for them. ... Elam is mentioned in Scripture in narratives and oracles. Abraham fought Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, to secure the return of Lot and others (Genesis 14:1 ). Although this king cannot be identified from other records, the events may have occurred during Elam's time of strength prior to Hammurabi. Prophets mentioned Elam in oracles. Isaiah's word of hope included the promise God would recover His people from Elam (Isaiah 11:11 ). In Isaiah 21:2 ; Isaiah 22:6 the prophet referred to Elam's military power. He called Elam to attack Babylon in Isaiah 21:1 . The second mention seems to refer to Elam as part of God's judgment on Judah. Jeremiah 25:25 includes Elam as a kingdom which must drink the cup of God's wrath. Later this same prophet ( Jeremiah 49:34-39 ), in the days of Zedekiah, pronounced judgment on Elam. No explanation for the judgment is given; but Elam, as a vassal of Babylon, may have participated in the attack on Jerusalem. Ezekiel pictured Elam in the pit (Sheol) where it experienced shame and punishment for its destructive ways (Ezekiel 32:24 ). ... Other biblical references mention Elam as a personal name or homeland. Perhaps most interesting is the presence of men from Elam on the day of Pentecost. These may have been Jews from the region of Elam or converts to Judaism (Acts 2:9 )
Elam - The district was also called Elam. In the days of Abraham Chedorlaomer king of Elam was able to make war as far off as the Dead Sea. When Assyria declined, Elam was conquered by its Persian neighbours, and reigned over by the Achaemenian Dynasty. Cyrus was king of Anshan, or Anzan (Elam) as well as of Persia: hence the close connection, and almost identification of Elam with Persia. In scripture Elam often designates Persia. In Isaiah 21:2-10 Elam and Media were to destroy Babylon. Daniel was at Shushan, which was in the province of Elam. Under the name of Susiana, Elam is represented by the historians as one of the most ancient regions of the East
e'Lamites - This word is found only in (Ezra 4:9 ) The Elamites were the original inhabitants of the country called Elam; they were descendants of Shem, and perhaps drew their name from an actual man Elam
Elamites - Inhabitants of Elam, some of whom were located in Palestine. Some of the same name, 550 years after, were present at Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost, but these were doubtless Jews from Elam
Elam - Elam (ç'lam). A country peopled by the descendants of Shem, and called, after his son, Elam. Elam was a strong power in Abram's time. A remarkable statement illustrating the truth of the Scriptures in respect to Elam has been deciphered from Assyrian cylinders in the British Museum
Shushan - It was for many centuries the capital of Elam, and afterwards one of the three capitals of the Persian empire. also Elam
Elam - Elam . A son of Shem ( Genesis 10:22 = 1 Chronicles 1:17 ), the eponymous ancestor of the Elamites (see following article). It was one of the Benê-Elam that urged Ezra to take action against mixed marriages ( Ezra 10:2 ), and six of the same family are reported to have put away their foreign wives ( Ezra 10:26 ). Elam acc. In the parallel lists Ezra 2:31 , Nehemiah 7:34 ‘the other Elam’ has also 1254 descendants who return with Zerubbabel. ... Elam . An important country of Western Asia, called Elamtu by the Babylonians and Elymais by the Greeks (also Susiana , from Shushan or Susa the capital). In Genesis 10:22 ( 1 Chronicles 1:17 ) Elam is called a son of Shem, from the mistaken idea that the people were of the Semitic race. ... Historically Elam’s most important place in the Bible is found in Genesis 14:1 ff. The period there alluded to was that of Elam’s greatest power, a little later than b. For many centuries previous, Elam had upon the whole been subordinate to the ruling power of Babylonia, no matter which of the great cities west of the Tigris happened to be supreme. Not many years later, Hammurabi of Babylon (perhaps the Amraphel of Genesis 14:1-24 ) threw off the yoke of Elam, which henceforth held an inferior place. Wars between the two countries were, however, very common, and Elam frequently had the advantage. A change in relations gradually took place after Assyria began to control Babylonia and thus encroach upon Elam, which was thenceforth, as a rule, in league with the patriotic Babylonians, especially with the Chaldæans from the south-land. Interesting and tragic is the story of the combined efforts of the Chaldæans and Elamites to repel the invaders. Osnappar ) completed the subjugation of Elam by deporting many of its inhabitants, among the exiles being a detachment sent to the province of Samaria ( Ezra 4:9 ). Shortly thereafter, when Assyria itself declined and fell, Elam was occupied by the rising Aryan tribes, the Medes from the north and the Persians from the south. ... Elam has a somewhat prominent place in the prophetic writings, in which Media + Elam = Persian empire. Particular interest attached to the part taken by the Elamites in the overthrow of Babylonia. An effect of this participation is curiously shown in the fact that after the Exile, Elam was a fairly common name among the Jews themselves ( Ezra 2:7 ; Ezra 2:31 , Nehemiah 7:12 , 1 Chronicles 8:24 et al
Kir - (Isaiah 22:6 ), who also was contemporary with these events, mentions it along with Elam. Some have supposed that Kir is a variant of Cush (Susiana), on the south of Elam
Susa (Shushan) - It was capital of the ancient Mesopotamian kingdom of Elam. When Elam was absorbed by Persia, Susa became capital of Persia, and remained so throughout the era of the Persian Empire (Ezra 4:9; Nehemiah 1:1; Esther 1:2; Esther 1:5; Esther 4:8; Esther 8:14; Daniel 8:2; see PERSIA)
Chedor-Laomer - (chehd awr lay' oh muhr) King of Elam who joined coalition of kings against kings of Sodom and Gomorrah, leading to Abraham's involvement and victory (Genesis 14:1 ). His Elamite name means, “son of La'gamal,” (a god). He does not appear in the fragmentary Elamite records known today, so nothing else is known except what Genesis 14:1 records. See Elam
Elam - The Elamites gave their name to Elymais, the region on the left or E. Chedorlaomer who invaded Palestine in Abraham's time (Genesis 14) was king of Elam, and then lord paramount over Amraphel, king of Shinar (Babylonia) on its confines. )... This Elamitic supremacy was of short duration. The Kissinns or Cossaeans (Cushites?) subsequently to the Elamites subjugated Elam and called it Kissia (Herodotus, 3:91; 5:49). The Greek traditions of Memnon and his Ethiopian bands rest on this subjugation, the Kissians of Elam being connected with the Cushite inhabitants of the upper valley of the Nile. Discoveries in Elam prove Susa one of the oldest cities in the East and its monarchs quasiindependent, while acknowledging Assyria's and Babylon's successive supremacy. ... Its bowmen were famed (Isaiah 22:6); so God says, "I will break the bow of Elam. " After scattering them God saith, "in the latter days I will bring again the captivity of Elam," namely, in the coming restitution of all things by Messiah, an earnest of which was given in that Elamites were on Pentecost among the first who heard and accepted the gospel (Acts 2:9). Elam took part in destroying Babylon, on Cyrus' advance probably joining him in the assault (Isaiah 21:2). Elam became a satrapy of the Persian empire, furnishing 300 talents as annual tribute (Herodotus, 3:91). Children of Elam, 1,254, returned with Zerubbabel from Babylon (Ezra 2:7; Nehemiah 7:12). Shechaniah, one of them, seconded Ezra's confession of sin, especially as to marriages with aliens, pleaded the people's guilt, and proposed a covenant to put away those wives; six of the sons of Elam accordingly did so (Ezra 10:2; Ezra 10:26). Another Elam, of whose sons also the same number returned, is mentioned (Ezra 2:31; Nehemiah 7:34)
e'Lam - (Genesis 14:1,9 ; Isaiah 11:11 ; 21:2 ) The Elam of Scripture appears to be the province lying south of Assyria and east of Persia proper, to which Herodotus gives the name of Cissia (iii. It is plain that at this early time the predominant power in lower Mesopotamia was Elam, which for a while held the place possessed earlier by Babylon, (Genesis 10:10 ) and later by either Babylon or Assyria. (1 Chronicles 8:24 ) ... "Children of Elam," to the number of 1254, returned with Zerubbabel from Babylon. ) Elam occurs amongst the names of the chief of the people who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:14 ) ... In the same lists is a second Elam, whose sons, to the same number as in the former case, returned with Zerubbabel, (Ezra 2:31 ; Nehemiah 7:34 ) and which for the sake of distinction is called "the other Elam
Elamites - Elamites are mentioned in Acts 2:9 among the sojourners in Jerusalem on the Day of Pentecost. Jews settled in Elam during the post-exilic period, whence they and their descendants came up to the Holy City for the annual religions festivals. Elam lay due east of Babylonia and the lower Tigris, and corresponds to the modern Khuzistan. The native Elamites had been gradually encroached upon, from the west, by invading Semites, who brought their own system of writing with them. This system was adopted by the Elamite princes for many of their votive tablets and inscribed monuments. Elamite chieftains ruled in Babylonia, but their power was broken by Hammurabi, whose son Samsu-iluna finally restored Babylonian supremacy. ; articles ‘Elam’ in Realencyklopädie für protestantische Theologie und Kirche 3 and Jewish Encyclopedia , and ‘Elam, Elamites’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols)
Ela - Esther 9:27 Esther 9:27 = Elam , Ezra 10:26
Tamar (1) - of Hebron toward Elam (Elath on the Red Sea), according to the Onomasticon
Chedorlaomer - King of Elam in the time of Abram. The name of KHUDUR-LAGAMAR king of Elam, has been met with in the inscriptions, which is supposed to be the same as Chedorlaomer
Elam - The name Elam is an Assyrian word meaning "high. " "The inhabitants of Elam, or 'the Highlands,' to the east of Babylon, were called Elamites. ... "The earliest Elamite kingdom seems to have been that of Anzan, the exact site of which is uncertain; but in the time of Abraham, Shushan or Susa appears to have already become the capital of the country. Babylonia was frequently invaded by the Elamite kings, who at times asserted their supremacy over it (as in the case of Chedorlaomer, the Kudur-Lagamar, or 'servant of the goddess Lagamar,' of the cuneiform texts). ... "The later Assyrian monarchs made several campaigns against Elam, and finally Assur-bani-pal (about B. On the fall of the Assyrian Empire, Elam passed into the hands of the Persians" (A
Chedor-Laomer - An early king of Elam, who, according to Genesis 14:1-24 , exercised dominion over a considerable part of Western Asia. The name of Chedor-laomer is a purely Elamite name ( Kudur-Lagamar or Kutir-Lagamar ), though it has not yet been found upon the inscriptions as that of an early king of Elam. de Morgan at Susa confirm the Biblical story, by revealing the considerable part which Elam played in the early history of Western Asia
Eli'ah - (1 Chronicles 8:27 ) ... One of the Bene-Elam, an Israelite (i
Elam - Elam was an ancient kingdom north of the Persian Gulf in the region of Mesopotamia
Chedorlao'Mer, - (handful of sheaves ), a king of Elam, in the time of Abraham, who with three other chiefs made war upon the kings of Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zeboim and Zoar, and reduced them to servitude
Tidal - Goyyim , translated "nations," is the country called Gutium, east of Tigris and north of Elam
Mag'Bish - (congregating ), a proper name in ( Ezra 2:30 ) but whether of a man or of a place is doubtful; probably the latter, as all the names from (Ezra 2:20 ) to 34, except Elam and Harim, are names of places
ra'Math-le'hi - (hill of the jawbone , or hill of Lehi ), the name bestowed by Samson on the scene of his slaughter of the thousand Philistines with the jaw bone, ( Judges 15:17 ) a place by the rock Elam, in western Judah of the Philistines
Kir - Being associated with Elam in Isaiah it is supposed to be in Lower Mesopotamia
Osnappar - He succeeded by great efforts in keeping together the empire of his father; and he added thereto the country of Elam in a fierce campaign which ended with the capture of Susa (Shushan), about b. It was after this event that the deportation, alluded to in Ezra 4:9-10 , of ‘Shushanchites’ and Elamites’ to Samaria and the vicinity took place. The war against Elam was the conclusion of a great conflict with Babylonia, with which country Elam on the east and most of the western subject States, including Judah, were in alliance
Lud - ; if the Lydians of western Asia were meant, the order would have been Elam, Asshur (Arphaxad), Aram, Lud; not Elam, Asshur (Arphaxad), Lud, Aram
Shushan - ” City in southwestern Iran which served as the ancient capital of the nation Elam. See Elam ; Persia
Arch - The word Elam occurs only in Ezekiel 40:21-36 , and in the A
ab'di - ) ... One of the Bene-Elam in the time of Ezra, who had married a foreign wife
Zimri - A difficult name of a nation God judged (Jeremiah 25:25 ), often taken as a copying change from the Hebrew for Cimmerians or a coded designation for Elam clarified by the immediate mention of Elam
Ulai - A large river of Elam, emptying into the Persian Gulf
Amraphel - King of Shinar, southern Chaldea, one of the confederates of Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, in a war against Sodom and cities of the plain (Genesis 14:1,4 )
Elam - It was called Elam after a son of Shem, Genesis 10:22
Elamites - Natives of Elam, a Persian province named after one of the sons of Sern (Genesis 10), south of Media and north of the Persian Gulf, seat of a mighty empire of which Susa was the capital, and the scene of wars between the Assyrians and the Babylonians; it was conquered by the Assyrians 640 B. Elamites were present at Pentecost (Acts 2)
Jeshaiah - The chief of the Benç-Elam who returned ( Ezra 8:7 [ 1Es 8:33 Jesaias ])
Cossaeans - ] Kasshç , a semi-barbarous people inhabiting the mountain region between Elam and Media proper
Admah - It was subject to Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, but its king revolted
Eber - As "Asshur" represented the Shemites who dwelt in the far East, including Elam, so Eber represents the western Shemites
Amraphel - He has been identified (by Schrader and usually) with Hammurabi, king of Babylonia, but apart from the difficulties due to differences of spelling, there is no evidence that Hammurabi was ever allied with a king of Elam and a king of Larsa to invade the West
Persia, Persians - They were for long subject to the more numerous and powerful northern branch (see Medes), from whom, however, they were separated by the country of Elam, through their settlement in the district later called Persis, east of the Persian Gulf. Southern Elam they acquired before b. 6 ‘Elam’ stands for Persia, into which it was incorporated; see above) 41, 44 47, Jeremiah 50:1-46 ; Jeremiah 51:1-64
Elam - Susiana, in later times, seems to have been a part of this country, Daniel 8:2 ; and before the captivity the Jews seem always to have intended Persia by the name of Elam. Stephanus takes it to be a part of Assyria, but Pliny and Josephus, more properly, of Persia, whose inhabitants, this latter tells us, sprung from the Elamites
Jer'Emoth - ) ... One of the sons of Elam, and, ... One of the sons of Zattu, who had taken strange wives
Tidal - A king of Goiim, or ‘the nations,’ who accompanied Amraphel of Shinar and Arioch of Ellasar in the expedition made by Chedorlaomer of Elam against Sodom and the cities of the plain ( Genesis 14:1 )
Elymais - This name, which represents the OT Elam , was given to a district of Persia, lying along the southern spurs of Mt
Chedorlaomer - King of Elam, in Persia, in the time of Abraham
Zimri - ‘All the kings of Zimri’ are mentioned in the same verse, Jeremiah 25:25 , with those of Elam and the Medes as among those who were to drink the cup of the fury of the Lord
Zeboiim - Zeboiim was ruled by King Shemeber but under the control of Chedorlaomer, king of Elam
Medes, Media - their territory extended southward to the borders of Elam. The southern portion of Elam soon fell to them, but they became vassals of their Median kindred. Elam, p
Shu'Shan, - It was originally the capital of the country called in Scripture Elam, and by the classical writers Susis or Susiana. In the time of Daniel Susa was in the possession of the Babylonians, to whom Elam had probably passed at the division of the Assyrian empire made by Cyaxares and Nabopolassar
Chedorlaomer - King of Elam, who for twelve years had in subjection to him the kings of Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zeboiim, and Bela, or Zoar. A recently deciphered record states that an Elamite king, Kudur-Nakhunta, conquered Babylon about 2290 B. , recovered an image of Nana captured by the Elamires from Uruk = Erech 1635 years previously, i. also allude to an interruption in the native dynasty about this date by a king from Elam or Susiana between the Tigris and Persia. There is mentioned among the Babylonian kings one who held his court at Ur in Lower Chaldaea, an Elamite prince, Kudur-Mabuk (or Chedorlaomer; Lagomer being an Elamite goddess of which Mabuk is the Hamitic name)
Sennacherib - After wars against the Kassites and Elamites in b. Building a fleet on the Tigris and Euphrates, he pursued the Chald¿an to the mouth of the Eul¿us, and there captured and destroyed the Chald¿an stronghold, thus invading Lower Elam. He was too far from his base, and the Elamites fell on his rear and captured Babylon, carried off Ashur-nâdin-shum to Elam, making a Chald¿an Nergal-ushçzib king in his stead; b. 691Samennacherib brought both Elamites and Babylonians to bay at Khalule. Two years later he invaded Elam
Persia - In ancient times the north-western part of this territory (the area that bordered the Mesopotamian Plain) was known as Elam (Genesis 14:1). At times the Bible makes a distinction between Elamites and Persians (Ezra 4:9), but usually Elam is simply another name for Persia (Isaiah 11:11; Isaiah 21:2; Jeremiah 25:25; Jeremiah 49:35-39). Regions to the north of Elam that were later closely allied with Persia were Media and Parthia (Esther 1:18; Acts 2:9)
Asnapper - Assur-bani-pal was a munificent patron of literature, and the conqueror of Elam
Shem - The portion of the earth occupied by the descendants of Shem, (Genesis 10:21,31 ) begins at its northwestern extremity with Lydia, and includes Syria (Aram), Chaldaea (Arphaxad), parts Of Assyria (Asshur), of Persia (Elam), and of the Arabian peninsula (Joktan)
Jehiel - ... ... One of the "sons" of Elam (Ezra 10:26 )
Shushan - Ancient city in the East, the capital of Elam, and which afterwards became the metropolis of Persia. ... Daniel speaks of the palace or fortress as being in the province of Elam, and he was by the river of Ulai
Ashurbanipal - (a' sshuhr ban' ih pal) Assyria's last great king who is identified in Ezra 4:10 as the king of Assyria who captured Susa, Elam, and other nations and settled their citizens in Samaria. He also waged a campaign against Elam, captured its capital Susa, and took many of the inhabitants captive to Assyria
Shem - Elam, and Lud (probably Lydians) are certainly not Semitic
Shushan - A celebrated city, called by the Greeks Susa, in the province of Elam
Cuthah - The mountainous region between Elam and Media was called Cuthah
Mesopotamia - At times in antiquity the culture of Mesopotamia dominated an even larger area, spreading east into Elam and Media, north into Asia Minor, and following the fertile cresent into Canaan and Egypt
Kir - It is said in 2 Kings 16:9 that Tiglath-pileser carried the people of Damascus captive to Kir, while in Isaiah 22:6 Kir is mentioned in connexion with Elam as furnishing soldiers to the Assyrian army which fought against Israel
Melchizedek - ... Old Testament When Abraham returned from the Valley of Siddim where he defeated Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, and the kings aligned with Kedorlaomer, Melchizedek greeted Abraham with bread and wine
Lud, Ludim - In Genesis 10:22 ( 1 Chronicles 1:17 ) Lud is named as one of the ‘sons’ of Shem, along with the well-known Elam, Asshur, and Aram, and the uncertain Arpachshad. In this list the Elamites at least are not Semitic, but are regarded as such by reason of association with the Babylonians
Abraham - He rescued Lot, when taken prisoner by the King of Elam, and on his return was met by Melchisedech, King of Salem, who blessed him
Aram - In Genesis 10 Aram is described as son of Shem; Elam, Asshur, Arphaxad, and Aram (arranged in the geographical order from E
Shushan - A lily, the Susa of Greek and Roman writers, once the capital of Elam
Mattani'ah - (2 Chronicles 20:14 ) ... One of the sons of Elam
Chaldea - Their conquests extended to Elam on the one side, and to the Lebanon on the other. But soon afterwards Babylonia fell under Elamite dominion. The kings of Babylon were compelled to acknowledge the supremacy of Elam, and a rival kingdom to that of Babylon, and governed by Elamites, sprang up at Larsa, not far from Ur, but on the opposite bank of the river. In the time of Abram the king of Larsa was Eri-Aku, the son of an Elamite prince, and Eri-Aku, as has long been recognized, is the Biblical "Arioch king of Ellasar" ( Genesis 14:1 )
Kir - Kir was a Mesopotamian city east of the lower Tigris River (which is now identified with the modern Badrah) on the main road from Elam (Persia) to Babylon
Shem - Shem had five sons:... Elam — originally settled in the province of Persia, of which Susa was the capital
Shem - Shem had five sons, Elam, Asher, Arphaxad, Lud, and Aran, who peopled the richest provinces of Asia
Sargon - By a succession of victories he gradually enlarged and consolidated the empire, which now extended from the frontiers of Egypt in the west to the mountains of Elam in the east, and thus carried almost to completion the ambitious designs of Tiglath-pileser (q
Gezer - ) An old Canaanite city, whose king, Horam or Elam, helping Lachish, was slain with his people by Joshua (Joshua 10:33; Joshua 12:12)
Babylon, Kingdom of - Babylonia was subsequently again broken up into more than one state, and at one time fell under the domination of Elam. This was put an end to by Khammu-rabi (Amraphel), who drove the Elamites out of the country, and overcame Arioch, the son of an Elamite prince. 1750 it was conquered by the Kassi, or Kosseans, from the mountains of Elam, and a Kassite dynasty ruled over it for 576 years and 9 months. ... In the time of Khammu-rabi, Syria and Palestine were subject to Babylonia and its Elamite suzerain; and after the overthrow of the Elamite supremacy, the Babylonian kings continued to exercise their influence and power in what was called "the land of the Amorites. ... Under Sennacherib, Babylonia revolted from Assyria several times, with the help of the Elamites, and after one of these revolts Babylon was destroyed by Sennacherib, B
Merodach Baladan - ... His sons, supported by the king of Elam, continued the struggle against Assyria under Esarhaddon, Sennacherib's son, and his grandsons against Asshur-bani-pal, Esarhaddon's son
Cush (2) - Isaiah couples it with Elam (Isaiah 40:11), Ezekiel with Persia (Ezekiel 38:5)
Timnah - As Beit Atab, into which Samson went down for refuge (now called Hasuta), answers to the rock Elam ("eagle's nest"), so seven miles off is a low hill, and close by is a chapel sacred to sheikh Nedhir, "the Nazarite chief," and higher up is the ruin "Ism-Allah," i
Babylon - After passing through various vicissitudes the city was occupied by Cyrus, "king of Elam," B
Cush - It stands also associated with Elam (Isaiah 11:11 ), with Persia (Ezekiel 38:5 ), and with the Sabeans (Isaiah 45:14 )
Bela - Bela is joined with Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, and Zeboim, in Genesis 14:2; Genesis 14:8, forming a confederacy against the invading kings of Elam, Shinar, etc
Babylon (2) - Asshur or Assyria and Mesopotamia were on the north, Elam and Media on the east, Chaldæa on the south
Zechariah - A descendant of Elam ( Ezra 10:26 ; Ezra 10:44 [ 1E Esther 9:27 Zacharias ])
Seir - The country had, however, been previously overrun, and no doubt very much depopulated, by the invasion of Chedorlaomer, king of Elam
Chaldaea - ) in which (See CHEDORLAOMER of Elam conquered Syria (Genesis 14), as the inscriptions show. boundary, Elam, or Susiana, lies on the E
Spirit; Breath - 49:36 the four winds represent the four ends of the earth, which in turn represent every quarter: “And upon Elam will I bring the four winds [peoples from every quarter of the earth] from the four quarters of heaven, and will scatter them toward all those winds; and there shall be no nation whither the outcasts of Elam shall not come
Dispersion - The following table shows how the different families were dispersed: ... | - Japheth | - Gomer | Cimmerians, Armenians | - Magog | Caucasians, Scythians | - Madal | Medes and Persian tribes | - Javan | - Elishah | Greeks | - Tarshish | Etruscans, Romans | - Chittim | Cyprians, Macedonians | - Dodanim | Rhodians | - Tubal | Tibareni, Tartars | - Mechech | Moschi, Muscovites | - Tiras | Thracians | | - Shem | - Elam | Persian tribes | - Asshur | Assyrian | - Arphaxad | - Abraham | - Isaac | - Jacob | Hebrews | - Esau | Edomites | - Ishmael | Mingled with Arab tribes | - Lud | Lydians | - Aram | Syrians | | - Ham | - Cush | Ethiopans | - Mizrain | Egyptians | - Phut | Lybians, Mauritanians | - Canaan | Canaanites, Phoenicians ...
Shushan - Susa was situated in the ancient province of Elam, or Elymais, called also Susiana, and now forming a part of Kuzestan
Shushan - The capital city of Elam, or Persia, Genesis 14:1 Daniel 8:2 , on the river Ulai
Assyria, History And Religion of - A rebellious king of Babylon, Merodach-baladan, found support from Elam, Assyria's enemy to the east. Merodach-baladan of Babylon, supported by the Elamites, had inspired the rebellion of all southern Mesopotamia. War continued, however, with Elam, which also influenced Babylon to rebel again. Assyria could do nothing because of a war with Elam. Action against Arab tribes followed, and the war with Elam continued until a final Assyrian victory in 639 B
Persia - The Persians, who became so famous after Cyrus, the founder of their more extended monarchy, were anciently called Elamites; and later, in the time of the Roman emperors, Parthians. Their descent is traced to Shem, through his son Elam, after whom they were originally named
Babylon, History And Religion of - It was found, however, in Susa, where it had been taken as booty by the Elamites about 1160 B. After a brief resurgence, the Kassite dynasty was ended by the Elamite invasion in 1160 B. ... When the Elamites withdrew to their Iranian homeland, princes native to the Babylonian city of Isin founded the Fourth Dynasty of Babylon. ) invaded Elam, Babylon entered a dark age for most of the next two centuries. With Elamite support he resisted the advances of the Assyrian Sargon II in 720 B. Merodach-baladan was forced to flee to Elam. Merodach-baladan had returned from Elam to Babylon. After considerable intrigue in Babylon, another Elamite-sponsored revolt broke out against Assyria
Persia, Persians - They conquered Elam ('ANSHAM' on the monuments)
Babel - Chedorlaomer (or Lagomer, an idol), king of Elam, is represented in Genesis 14 as leader of the other kings including the king of Shinar (Babylonia). Now Assyrian cuneiform inscriptions show that Elam (Elymais or Susiana, between Babylonia and Persia) maintained its independence through the whole Assyrian period, and that at a date earlier than that commonly assigned to Abraham (2286 B. ) an Elamite king plundered Babylonia. Chedorlaomer of Elam established a short-lived empire, extending to the mountains of Elam and to Palestine and Syria. ... This early Babylonian empire, which subsequently to Chedorlaomer's reign in Elam lasted 458 years, fell by the revision of barbarian hordes, probably Arabs. ; the dynasty succeeding Chedorlaomer's short lived Elamitic empire from 1976 B. " Kudur Nakhunta of Elam, whose court was at Susa, in 2286 invaded Chaldaea and carried off the Babylonian images
Persia - the Persian gulf, Elam on the W. " (See Elam on its relation to Persia
Per'Sia - This tract was bounded on the west by Susiana or Elam, on the north by Media on the south by the Persian Gulf and on the east by Carmania
Amalekites - But Moses speaks of the Amalekites long before this Amalek was born; namely, in the days of Abraham, when Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, devastated their country, Genesis 14:7 ; from which it may be inferred that there was some other and more ancient Amalek, from whom this people sprang
Shushan - Capital of Elam, Cissia, or Susiana
Remnant - 11:11, the prophet proclaims: “And it shall come to pass in that day, that the Lord shall set his hand again the second time to recover the remnant of his peoplewhich shall be left from Assyria, and from Egypt, and from Pathros, and from Cush, and from Elam, and from Shinar, and from Hamath, and from the islands of the sea
Zechari'ah - ) ... One of the family of Elam who had married a foreign wife after the captivity
Shem - " His descendants dwelt chiefly in western Asia, Shem of the Asiatic Japhethites, in an uninterrupted line from the Mediterranean to the mountains of Luristan and the Indian Ocean, Lydia, Palestine, Syria (Aram), Chaldaea (Arphaxad), Assyria (Asshur), Persia (Elam), northern and central Arabia (Joktan). Moses adds to the Semitic races the Elamites and Ludites, concerning which ethnology says nothing
Damascus - The people of Damascus were carried captive to Kir, as Amos (Amos 1:5) foretold, the region from which they originally came, associated with Elam (Isaiah 22:6), probably in Lower Mesopotamia = Kish or Cush, i
Nehemiah - 445 444, Nehemiah is at Susa, the chief city of Elam and the winter residence of the Persian court
a'Braham - Lot with his family and possessions having been carried away captive by Chedorlaomer king of Elam, who had invaded Sodom, Abram pursued the conquerors and utterly routed them not far from Damascus
Medes - as when God overthrew Sodom"); so Isaiah 21:2, "go up O Elam (Persia), besiege O Media
Assur - , Elam or Susiana, now the country near Bagdad, on the S. However the inscriptions of Sargon, king of Agane near Sippars (Sepharvaim), describe his conquests in Elam and Syria, and his advance to the Mediterranean coast, where he set up a monument 1600 B
Abraham - ... Some fourteen years before this, while Abram was still in Chaldea, Palestine had been invaded by Chedorlaomer, King of Elam, who brought under tribute to him the five cities in the plain to which Lot had removed
Assyria - Brown: "We find mention in the inscriptions of Persia (Parsua), Elam (Elamtu), with Susa (Shushan, cf
Jeremiah, Book of - Judgements were to fall upon Egypt, the Philistines, Moab, the Ammonites, Edom, Damascus, Kedar, Elam, and Babylon
Jeremiah - ... Finally there is a collection of messages for foreign nations: Egypt (46:1-28), Philistia (47:1-7), Moab and Ammon (48:1-49:6), Edom (49:7-22), Damascus, Kedar, Hazor and Elam (49:23-39), and Babylon (50:1-51:64)
Tongues, Confusion of - Moses adds Elam and Lud, of which ethnology says nothing
Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times - He also looks for blessing in those days, for the Lord will restore Moab (48:47) and Elam (49:39)
Abraham - ... Fourteen years previously Chedorlaomer, king of Elam (the region S. Babylon was originally the predominant power; but a recently deciphered Assyrian record states that an Elamitie king, Kudur Nakhunta, conquered Babylon 2296 B
Jeremiah, Theology of - Surprisingly, there are also bald, unconditional announcements of restoration for Egypt (46:26b), Moab (48:47), Ammon (49:6), and Elam (49:39)
Division of the Earth - ) His son Elam appears to have been settled in Elymais, or southern Persia, contiguous to the maritime tract of Chusistan, Daniel 8:2
Jeru'Salem - It brought water from the spring Elam, on the south, beyond Bethlehem, into the reservoirs under the temple enclosure
Israel - The sons of Shem were Elam, Assyria, Mesopotamia, Lud (a land of unknown situation, not Lydia), and Aram (the Aramæans)
Babylon - ... When in the plenitude of its greatness, splendour and strength, Babylon first yielded to the arms of Cyrus, whose name, and the manoeuvre by which the city was taken, were mentioned by Isaiah nearly two hundred years before the event; which was also predicted by Jeremiah: "Go up, O Elam, (or Persia,) besiege, O Media