Places Study on Kidron

Places Study on Kidron

2 Samuel 15: And all the country wept with a loud voice, and all the people passed over: the king also himself passed over the brook Kidron, and all the people passed over, toward the way of the wilderness.
1 Kings 2: For it shall be, that on the day thou goest out, and passest over the brook Kidron, thou shalt know for certain that thou shalt surely die: thy blood shall be upon thine own head.
1 Kings 15: And also Maachah his mother, even her he removed from being queen, because she had made an idol in a grove; and Asa destroyed her idol, and burnt it by the brook Kidron.
2 Kings 23: And the king commanded Hilkiah the high priest, and the priests of the second order, and the keepers of the door, to bring forth out of the temple of the LORD all the vessels that were made for Baal, and for the grove, and for all the host of heaven: and he burned them without Jerusalem in the fields of Kidron, and carried the ashes of them unto Bethel.
2 Kings 23: And he brought out the grove from the house of the LORD, without Jerusalem, unto the brook Kidron, and burned it at the brook Kidron, and stamped it small to powder, and cast the powder thereof upon the graves of the children of the people.
2 Kings 23: And the altars that were on the top of the upper chamber of Ahaz, which the kings of Judah had made, and the altars which Manasseh had made in the two courts of the house of the LORD, did the king beat down, and brake them down from thence, and cast the dust of them into the brook Kidron.
2 Chronicles 15: And also concerning Maachah the mother of Asa the king, he removed her from being queen, because she had made an idol in a grove: and Asa cut down her idol, and stamped it, and burnt it at the brook Kidron.
2 Chronicles 29: And the priests went into the inner part of the house of the LORD, to cleanse it, and brought out all the uncleanness that they found in the temple of the LORD into the court of the house of the LORD. And the Levites took it, to carry it out abroad into the brook Kidron.
2 Chronicles 30: And they arose and took away the altars that were in Jerusalem, and all the altars for incense took they away, and cast them into the brook Kidron.
Jeremiah 31: And the whole valley of the dead bodies, and of the ashes, and all the fields unto the brook of Kidron, unto the corner of the horse gate toward the east, shall be holy unto the LORD; it shall not be plucked up, nor thrown down any more for ever.

Chain Links

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Kidron, Brook of
(Hebrew: dark)

Or Kidron. Ravine 20 miles long, east of Jerusalem near the Mount of Olives (2 Kings 15; 3Kings 2; Jeremiah 31). Christ crossed it to Gethsemani (John 18). Traditional tomb of the Blessed Virgin is venerated in the Valley of the Cedron.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Kidron
Kedron = Cedron, turbid, the winter torrent which flows through the Valley of Jehoshaphat, on the eastern side of Jerusalem, between the city and the Mount of Olives. This valley is known in Scripture only by the name "the brook Kidron." David crossed this brook bare-foot and weeping, when fleeing from Absalom (2 Samuel 15:23,30 ), and it was frequently crossed by our Lord in his journeyings to and fro (John 18:1 ). Here Asa burned the obscene idols of his mother (1 Kings 15:13 ), and here Athaliah was executed (2 Kings 11:16 ). It afterwards became the receptacle for all manner of impurities (2 Chronicles 29:16 ; 30:14 ); and in the time of Josiah this valley was the common cemetery of the city (2 Kings 23:6 ; Compare Jeremiah 26:23 ). Through this mountain ravine no water runs, except after heavy rains in the mountains round about Jerusalem. Its length from its head to en-Rogel Isaiah 2 3/4 miles. Its precipitous, rocky banks are filled with ancient tombs, especially the left bank opposite the temple area. The greatest desire of the Jews is to be buried there, from the idea that the Kidron is the "valley of Jehoshaphat" mentioned in Joel 3:2 .

Below en-Rogel the Kidron has no historical or sacred interest. It runs in a winding course through the wilderness of Judea to the north-western shore of the Dead Sea. Its whole length, in a straight line, is only some 20 miles, but in this space its descent is about 3,912 feet. (See KEDRON .)

Recent excavations have brought to light the fact that the old bed of the Kidron is about 40 feet lower than its present bed, and about 70 feet nearer the sanctuary wall.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Kidron Valley
(kid' ruhn) Place name meaning “turbid, dusky, gloomy.” The deep ravine beside Jerusalem separating the Temple mount and the city of David on the west from the Mount of Olives on the east. The Spring of Gihon lies on the western slope. The Garden of Gethsemane would have been above the valley on the eastern side. Cemeteries have been located in this area since the Middle Bronze Age (before 1500 B.C.). David crossed the brook when he fled Jerusalem to escape from Absalom (2 Samuel 15:23 ). Solomon warned Shimei not to cross it or he would die (1 Kings 2:37 ). Here certain kings of Judah destroyed idols and other pagan objects removed from the Temple area (1 Kings 15:13 ; 2Kings 23:4,2Kings 23:6,2 Kings 23:12 ; 2 Chronicles 29:16 ; 2 Chronicles 30:14 ). After the Last Supper, Jesus went through the Kidron Valley on his way to the Mount of Olives (John 18:1 ). See City of David ; Jerusalem ; Mount of Olives; Spring of Gihon; Valley of Hinnom.

Ricky L. Johnson



Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kidron
KIDRON . A place fortified by Cendebæus ( 1Ma 15:39 ; 1Ma 15:41 ), and the point to which he was pursued after his defeat by the sons of Simon the Maccabee (16:9). It may be the modern Katrah near Yebna , and is possibly identical with ‘ Gederoth of Joshua 15:41 , 2 Chronicles 28:18 .

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kidron (1)
KIDRON (AV [Note: Authorized Version.] Cedron ), THE BROOK ( nachat , ‘torrent valley,’ ‘wady,’ 2 Samuel 15:23 , 1Ki 2:37 , 2 Chronicles 33:14 , Nehemiah 2:15 etc.; Gr. cheimarrous , John 18:1 ). The name of a valley, nearly 3 miles in length, which bounds the plateau of Jerusalem on the East. It is always dry except during and immediately after heavy rain; it is the same valley that is referred to as the Valley of Jehoshaphat (wh. see). It commences about 1 1 / 4 miles N. of the N.W. corner of the city walls, as a wide, open, shallow valley. At first it runs S.E., receiving tributaries from the W. and N., but where it is now crossed by the modern carriage road to the Mt. of Olives, it turns South. Near this spot (as well as higher up) there are a number of ancient tombs; among them on the W. side of the valley are the so-called ‘Tombs of the Kings,’ and on the East the reputed tomb of ‘Simon the Just,’ much venerated by the Jews. The whole of this first open section of the valley is to-day known as Wady el-Joz ; (‘Valley of the Nuts’): it is full of fertile soil, and in a great part of its extent is sown with corn or planted with olives or almonds. As the valley approaches the East wall of the city it rapidly deepens, and rocky scarps appear on each side; it now receives the name Wady Sitti Miriam, i.e . ‘Valley of the Lady Mary.’ Opposite the Temple area the bottom of the valley, now 40 feet below the present surface, is about 400 feet below the Temple platform. S. of this it continues to narrow and deepen, running between the village of Silwân (see Siloam) on the E. and the hill Ophel on the West. Here lies the ‘Virgin’s Fount,’ ancient Gihon (wh. see), whose waters to-day rise deep under the surface, though once they ran down the valley itself. A little farther on the valley again expands into a considerable open area, where vegetables are now cultivated, and which perhaps was once the ‘ King’s Garden ’ (wh. see). The Tyropœon Valley, known now as el-Wâd , joins the Kidron Valley from the N., and farther on the Wady er-Rabâbi traditionally Hinnom (wh. see), runs in from the West. The area again narrows at Bîr Eyyûb , the ancient En-rogel (wh. see), and the valley continues a long winding course under the name of Wady en-Nâr (‘Valley of Fire’) till it reaches the Dead Sea.

There is no doubt whatever that this is the Kidron of the OT and NT. It is interesting that the custom of burying Israelites there, which is observed to-day (see Jehoshaphat [Valley of]), is referred to in 2 Kings 23:4 ; 2Ki 23:6 ; 2 Kings 23:12 , and 2 Chronicles 34:5 . It is probable that the place of the ‘graves of the common people’ ( Jeremiah 26:23 ) was also here, and it has been suggested, from a comparison with Jeremiah 31:40 , with less plausibility, that this may have been the scene of Ezekiel’s vision of the dry bones ( Ezekiel 37:1-28 ). The ‘fields of Kidron’ ( 2 Kings 23:4 ), though generally identified with the open part of the valley when it is joined by the Tyropœon Valley, are more likely to have been the open upper reaches of the valley referred to above as Wady el-Joz , which were on the way to Bethel.

The Valley of the Kidron is mentioned first and last in the Bible at two momentous historical crises, when David crossed it (2 Samuel 15:23 ) amid the lamentations of his people as he fled before Absalom, and when Jesus ‘went forth with His disciples over the brook Kidron’ ( John 18:1 ) for His great and terrible agony before His crucifixion.

E. W. G. Masterman.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Kidron
KIDRON.—See Brook.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Kidron
Obscure; making black or sad
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Kidron
See Cedron

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Kidron, Kedron, Brook
The valley, or wide wady, that lies between the east of Jerusalem and the west of Mount Olivet. It is joined by the valley of Hinnom that runs along the south of Jerusalem, and it continues its course for about twenty miles to the Dead Sea. Though called a brook, it is now nearly always dry; this is supposed to be partially due to the amount of rubbish lying in the valley. Its true bottom has been found some forty feet below, and much nearer to the walls of the city. The side of the valley nearest the city is full of Mahometan graves, and on the eastern slope are the graves of the Jews, among which is the erection called the Pillar of Absalom. In O.T. times it was treated as a defiled place. Asa burnt his mother's idol there. 1 Kings 15:13 . Josiah also burnt there the symbols of idolatry. 2 Kings 23:4,6,12 ; and by 2 Kings 23:6 ; Jeremiah 31:40 it would appear to have been the common burial ground.

On the revolt of Absalom David crossed the brook ere he climbed the mount of Olives. The Lord also crossed it on His last visit to Gethsemane, when He was about to be delivered up by Judas. 2 Samuel 15:23,30 ; John 18:1 , where the A.V. has CEDRON. See JEHOSHAPHAT,VALLEY OF.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Kidron
Kidron or Cedron, John 18:1, A. V., (kĭd'ron or ke'dron), or Kedron, 2 Samuel 15:23; 1 Kings 15:13; black brook. From a Hebrew root signifying "black," not from cedars, cedar-brook. It is a small stream, dry in summer, but growing into a torrent in the rainy season; rises 1½ miles northwest of Jerusalem; runs in a southeastern direction until it reaches the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea. Here Athaliah was executed, 2 Kings 11:16; here Maachah's idols were burnt, 1 Kings 15:13; 2 Chronicles 15:16; and hither the impurities and abominations of idol-worship were regularly carried and destroyed. 2 Chronicles 29:16; 2 Chronicles 30:14; 2 Kings 23:4; 2 Kings 23:6; 2 Kings 23:12. In the time of Josiah it became the common burial-place of the city, 2 Kings 23:16, and so it is today. The two events, however, connected with it, and which give it its greatest interest, are David's crossing it on his flight from Jerusalem when Absalom rebelled, 2 Samuel 15:23; 2 Samuel 15:30; and Christ's crossing it on his way to Gethsemane. John 18:1; Mark 14:26; Luke 22:39. As Cæsar crossed the Rubicon for the military conquest of the world, so Christ crossed the Kedron for the salvation of the world.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Kidron or Cedron
A winter torrent, and the valley in which it flowed, east of Jerusalem. This valley begins a little northwest of the city, passes some two hundred rods north of the present wall, and turns to the south. Here it is wide and open; but as it runs south between the city and mount Olivet, it becomes narrow and deep. Opposite mount Moriah, it is a mere torrent's bed, one hundred and fifty feet below the city wall. It sinks still deeper as it passes Siloam, the valley of Hinnom, and the well of Nehemiah, and then winds southeast, in a narrow and precipitous gorge, through the horrid wilderness of St. Saba, to the Dead Sea. The bed of the Kidron is now dry most of the year; even in the rainy season it has no constant stream, though heavy and continued rains may create an impetuous but short-lived torrent. It is crossed by a causeway and a bridge of a single arch, between St. Stephen's Gate and the Garden of Gethsemane. By this route probably David fled from Absalom, 2 Samuel 15:23 ; and the Savior often passed this way in going to Bethany, Mount Olivet, and Gethsemane, John 18:1-2 . In this valley and in that of Hinnom, at their confluence, kings Asa, Josiah, and Hezekiah destroyed the idols and abominations by which Jerusalem was defiled, 1 Kings 15:13 2 Kings 23:4,6,12 2 Chronicles 29:16 . See Ezekiel 47:1-12 .

Sentence search

Ked'Ron, - properly Kidron. [Kidron ]
Cedron - (cee' drahn) KJV spelling for Kidron in John 18:1 . See Kidron
Cedron - See Kidron,...
Kedron - See Kidron
Cedron - See Kidron
Kedron - See Kidron
Cedron - See Kidron
Kidron - Kidron
ce'Dron - (John 18:1 ) [SEE Kidron ]
Cedron - See Kidron
Shaveh, Valley of - ), or Kidron, on the north side of Jerusalem (Genesis 14:17 )
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - the Kidron Valley has been known as the Valley of Jehoshaphat; but there is no reason for believing Joel was referring to the Kidron Valley
Gederoth - Possibly it is also the Kidron of 1Ma 15:39 ; 1Ma 15:41 ; 1Ma 16:8
Siloah - the same as Siloam, Nehemiah 3:15 ; Luke 13:4 ; a fountain under the walls of Jerusalem, toward the east, between the city and the brook Kidron, perhaps the same with Enrogel
Kidron - This valley is known in Scripture only by the name "the brook Kidron. The greatest desire of the Jews is to be buried there, from the idea that the Kidron is the "valley of Jehoshaphat" mentioned in Joel 3:2 . ... Below en-Rogel the Kidron has no historical or sacred interest. ) ... Recent excavations have brought to light the fact that the old bed of the Kidron is about 40 feet lower than its present bed, and about 70 feet nearer the sanctuary wall
Kidron, Brook of - (Hebrew: dark) ... Or Kidron
Cedron, Brook of - (Hebrew: dark) ... Or Kidron
King's Dale - This is supposed to be in the valley of the Kidron, where there is still a monument called the Pillar of Absalom, though the existing one cannot be the pillar he erected
Decision, Valley of - The scene of this judgment has been fixed by Jews, Roman Catholics, and Mohammedans in the Valley of the Kidron. The valley of Jehoshaphat has been identified with the Valley of the Kidron since the time of Eusebius
Maktesh - Early commentators located the site in the Kidron Valley
Kidron - Kidron
Pinnacle - Josephus describes a gallery constructed by Herod to overhang the deep valley of the Kidron, and says that the beholder on looking down from it would become dizzy
Zoheleth, Stone of - It was near the spring Enrogel , which is supposed to be the ‘Virgin’s Fountain’ in the Kidron valley
Pinnacle - At the south-eastern corner the roof of this cloister was some 300 feet above the Kidron valley
Siloam, Tower in - The village of Siloam is on the east slope of the Kidron valley, curiously formed as if ancient tombs had been appropriated, so that the houses appear to be clinging to the sides of the hill; it is not, however, known whether the tower was in any way connected with this village
Kidron (1) - Kidron (AV [Note: Authorized Version. The Tyropœon Valley, known now as el-Wâd , joins the Kidron Valley from the N. ... There is no doubt whatever that this is the Kidron of the OT and NT. The ‘fields of Kidron’ ( 2 Kings 23:4 ), though generally identified with the open part of the valley when it is joined by the Tyropœon Valley, are more likely to have been the open upper reaches of the valley referred to above as Wady el-Joz , which were on the way to Bethel. ... The Valley of the Kidron is mentioned first and last in the Bible at two momentous historical crises, when David crossed it (2 Samuel 15:23 ) amid the lamentations of his people as he fled before Absalom, and when Jesus ‘went forth with His disciples over the brook Kidron’ ( John 18:1 ) for His great and terrible agony before His crucifixion
Kedron - (See Kidron
Zoheleth - This place was near En-rogel, a spring or well near Jerusalem where the Kidron Valley and the Valley of Hinnom meet
Cendebaeus - In a battle which took place in a plain not far from Modin the Jews gained a complete victory over Cendebæus, and pursued the Syrians as far as Kidron and the neighbourhood of Ashdod ( 1Ma 15:38 ; 1Ma 16:9 ; cf
Bethesda - " It is usually identified with the modern so-called Fountain of the Virgin, in the valley of the Kidron, and not far from the Pool of Siloam (q. ); and also with the Birket Israel, a pool near the mouth of the valley which runs into the Kidron south of "St
Shaveh - The Genesis Apocryphon locates it in Beth-Hakkerem, which is two and a half miles south of Jerusalem where the Kidron and Hinnom valleys join
Gethsemane - A place across the Kidron and at the foot of Olivet, noted as the scene of our Lord's agony
en-Rogel - The shaft sunk through the solid rock in the bed of the Kidron Isaiah 125 feet deep
King's Garden - See Kidron [Brook of], Siloam... E
Gethsemane - slope of the Mount of Olives above the Kidron; but there is no justification for the exact localization of the site
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - Since the third century, however, the name has been appropriated to the deep and narrow glen east of Jerusalem, running north and south between the city and the Mount of Olives, called in the Bible the brook Kidron
Fountain - Only one fountain has been discovered at Jerusalem, the so-called "Virgins's Fountains," in the valley of Kidron; and only one well (Heb. beer), the Bir Eyub, also in the valley of Kidron, south of the King's Gardens, which has been dug through the solid rock
Gethsemane - ” Place where Jesus went after the Last Supper, a garden outside the city, across the Kidron on the Mount of Olives (Matthew 26:36-56 ; Mark 14:32-52 ; Luke 22:39-53 ; John 18:1-14 ). ” See Mount of Olives; Kidron; Judas
Hinnom, Valley of - Of the three valleys of Jerusalem the Kidron on the E. In favour of the Kidron is the fact that the theological Gehinnom or Arab. Then this Valley of Hinnom is a gai or gorge, but the Valley of Kidron is always described as a nachal (‘wady’). Near where the valley joins the wide Kidron is the traditional site of Akeldama
en-Rogel - En-rogel lay near Jerusalem where the Kidron and Hinnom valleys met at modern Bir Ayyub
Zoheleth - Zoheleth projects into or slightly over-hangs the Kidron valley
Dragon Well - The Dragon Well has been identified with the Gihon spring, the main water source during the time of Hezekiah, the Siloam pool which was fed by the Gihon, the En-rogel spring located 210 meters south of the confluence of the Hinnom and Kidron valleys, or with a spring along the east side of the Tyropoeon Valley which has since dried up
Gethsemane - It lay east of Jerusalem, across the Kidron (John 18:1), at the foot of or upon the Mount of Olives (Matthew 26:20, Mark 14:26, Luke 22:39 : cf. The traditional site is in the Kidron ravine, at a point about equidistant, as the crow flies, from the Golden Gate and St. It is easily reached by the road passing through the latter and crossing the Kidron bridge, just beyond which it lies, a square plot of ground with eight very ancient olive-trees
Torches - Although it was the time of full moon, yet in the valley of the Kidron "there fell great, deep shadows from the declivity of the mountain and projecting rocks; there were there caverns and grottos, into which a fugitive might retreat; finally, there were probably a garden-house and tower, into whose gloom it might be necessary for a searcher to throw light around
Bethesda - The only body of water at Jerusalem that presents any analogous phenomenon is the intermittent spring known as the Virgin’s Fountain, in the Kidron valley, but it is not near the Sheep-gate
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - It was and is otherwise known as the Valley of the Kidron, q
Gihon - The name comes from a Hebrew word meaning, “a bursting forth,” and is descriptive of the spring which is located in the Kidron Valley. See Eden ; Hezekiah ; Jerusalem ; Kidron Valley ; Siloam ; Water
en-Rogel - The identification of this spring lies between two places, the Virgin’s Fountain and Job’s Well , both in the Kidron Valley
Pinnacle - Possible identifications include the southeastern corner of the royal colonnade which overlooked the Kidron valley and a lintel or balcony above one of the Temple gates
Enrogel - It is in the valley of the Kidron, just below its junction with the valley of the son of Hinnom, on the southeast corner of Jerusalem, Joshua 15:7 ; 18:16
Shittim - In Joel 3:18 the symbolic meaning of acacias (note NAS) comes to the fore in the messianic picture of fertility for the Kidron Valley with a stream flowing from the Temple
o'Phel - Ophel was the swelling declivity by which the mount of the temple slopes on its southern side into the valley of Hinnom--a long, narrowish rounded spur or promontory, which intervenes between the mouth of the central valley of Jerusalem (the Tyropoeon) and the Kidron, or valley of Jehoshaphat
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - This is the name given in modern times to the valley between Jerusalem and the Mount of Olives, and the Kidron flows through it
Gates of Jerusalem And the Temple - On the east, entrance from the Kidron Valley was signed principally through the Sheep Gate (modern Stephen or Lion Gate) in New Testament times and by a recently found gate (Spring, 1986) south of the modern city walls in Old Testament times
Kid'Ron, - Mark 14:26 ; Luke 22:39 The distinguishing peculiarity of the Kidron valley --mentioned in the Old Testament-- is the impurity which appears to have been ascribed to it
Brook - ... The Kidron contains water only after heavy rains. ... The modern name of the brook Kidron is Wady Sitti Maryam, ‘Valley of the Lady Mary. To this day the Jews greatly covet a grave in the Kidron valley
Siloam, Tower of - The place here spoken of is the village now called Silwan, or Kefr Silwan, on the east of the valley of Kidron, and to the north-east of the pool
Kidron Valley - After the Last Supper, Jesus went through the Kidron Valley on his way to the Mount of Olives (John 18:1 )
Olives, Mount of - Both the central Mount of Olives and Mount Scopus, the peak on its northern side, rise over two hundred feet above the Temple mount across the Kidron Valley
Pinnacle - Here, as Josephus informs us and the excavations corroborate his testimony a spectator looking down into the valley of the Kidron ‘would turn giddy, while his sight could not reach down so such an abyss’ ( Ant
Shittim - ) perhaps the ‘Valley of the brook Kidron,’ the modern Wady en-Nâr
Kidron - Kidron or Cedron, John 18:1, A
Kidron or Cedron - The bed of the Kidron is now dry most of the year; even in the rainy season it has no constant stream, though heavy and continued rains may create an impetuous but short-lived torrent
Sabas, Saint - Several persons joining him, he laid the foundations of his monastery on a rock on the Kidron river, where it still remains
Valley - ), "either (1) because there were several valleys within the city and adjacent to it, as the vale between Mount Zion and Moriah, the vale between Mount Moriah and Mount Ophel, between these and Mount Bezetha, and the valley of Jehoshaphat, the valley of the brook Kidron, etc
Siloah, Siloam - A pool on the south of Jerusalem near the west slope of the Kidron valley
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - The valley, moreover, does not suit the conditions, in that it is a nachal (wady) the nachal Kidron (wh
Gethsemane - Early tradition locates Gethsemane near the base of Mount Olivet, beyond the brook Kidron
Hin'Nom - To put an end to these abominations the place was polluted by Josiah, who renders it ceremonially unclean by spreading over it human bones and other corruptions, (2 Kings 23:10,13,14 ; 2 Chronicles 34:4,5 ) from which time it appears to have become the common cesspool of the city, into which sewage was conducted, to be carried off by the waters of the Kidron
David, City of - The Kidron Valley bordered it on the east, and the Tyropoeon Valley on the west
Siloam - John 9:7,11 , or SHILOAH, Nehemiah 3:15 Isaiah 8:6 ; a fountain and pool at the vase of the hill Ophel, near the opening of the Tyropoeon into the valley of the Kidron on the south of Jerusalem; ... "Siloah's brook, that flowed ... Fast by the oracle of God
Jerusalem - It lies on ground which slopes gently down towards the east, the slope being terminated by an abrupt declivity, in some parts precipitous, and overhanging the valley of Jehoshaphat or of the Kidron. It was but a part of the continuous ridge on the east side of the city, overlooking the deep valley of the Kidron; rising on the north, after a slight depression, into the hill Bezetha, the "new city" of Joephus, and sinking away on the south into the hill Ophel. On the east of Jerusalem, and stretching from north to south, lies the Mount of Olives, divided from the city by the valley of the Kidron, and commanding a noble prospect of the city and surrounding county. Just below the city, on the east side of the valley of the Kidron, lies the miserable village of Siloa; farther down, this valley unites with that of Hinnon, at a beautiful spot anciently "the king's gardens;" still below, is the well of Nehemiah, anciently En-rogel; and from this spot the united valley winds among mountains southward and eastward to the Dead sea. In the rocks around Jerusalem, and chiefly in the sides of the valleys of the Kidron and Hinnom opposite the city, are many excavated tombs and caves. This southern wall, in the period of kings and of Christ, traversed the outmost verge of those hills, inclosing the pool of Siloam, Ophel, and portions apparently of the valleys of Hinnom and the Kidron, 2 Chronicles 33:14 Nehemiah 2:14 3:15 . At its southeast corner, where the wall is seventy-seven feet high, the ground at its base is one hundred and fifty feet above the dry bed of the Kidron
Olives, Olivet, Mount of - The mountain range on the east of Jerusalem, separated from the city by the Kidron valley
Potter - The ‘field of blood,’ or Akeldama (חֲקֵל דְּמָא), is generally identified with a spot in which there are numerous tombs, and where also clay is found, lying to the south of Jerusalem, in the valley of Hinnom, not far from the point where it joins the valley of the Kidron (Baedeker, p
Potter - The ‘field of blood,’ or Akeldama (חֲקֵל דְּמָא), is generally identified with a spot in which there are numerous tombs, and where also clay is found, lying to the south of Jerusalem, in the valley of Hinnom, not far from the point where it joins the valley of the Kidron (Baedeker, p
Gihon - ), which rises outside the city walls on the west bank of the Kidron valley
Olives, Mount of - Ezekiel 11:23 , called also OLIVET, 2 Samuel 15:30 , a ridge running north and south on the east side of Jerusalem, its summit about half a mile from the city wall, and separated from it by the valley of the Kidron
Olves, Mount of - So called from the olive trees with which its sides are clothed, is a mountain ridge on the east of Jerusalem (1 Kings 11:7 ; Ezekiel 11:23 ; Zechariah 14:4 ), from which it is separated by the valley of Kidron
Pinnacle - As the top of the portico, according to Josephus, was 100 feet above the pavement, the drop from this elevation to the bottom of the Kidron Valley would be about 300 feet; and if ‘the pinnacle,’ as some suppose, was a turret or spire at the eastern end, marking the south-east corner of the enclosure, then its height would have to be added to this vertical distance
Olives, Mount of - The range of hills east of Jerusalem, separated from the Temple mountain by the Kidron Valley
Zion or Sion - It was separated from Akra on the north and Moriah on the north-west by the valley Tyropeon; and had the valley of Gihon on the west, that of Hinnom on the south, and that of the Kidron on the south-east
Gehenna (2) - Warren in an extended and somewhat convincing article on ‘Hinnom (Valley of)’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, identifies it with the Kidron on the E
Galley - The brook Kidron, which emptied itself into the Dead Sea, was the only one near it
Jerusalem - The defining valleys are: (1) the Wady en-Nâr , the Biblical Valley of the Kidron or of Jehoshaphat , which, starting some distance north of the city, runs at first (under the name of Wady el-Jôz ) in a S. The only natural source is an intermittent spring in the Kidron Valley, which is insufficient to supply the city’s needs. But the majority of modern scholars are now coming to an agreement that the pre-Davidic Jerusalem was situated on the hill known as Ophel , the south-eastern of the four hills above enumerated, in the space intercepted between the Tyropœon and Kidron valleys. This is the hill under which is the only natural source of water in the whole area of Jerusalem the ‘ Virgin’s Fountain ,’ an intermittent spring of brackish water in the Kidron Valley and upon which is the principal accumulation of ancient débris , with ancient pottery fragments strewn over the surface. Hezekiah still further prepared Jerusalem for the struggle which he foresaw from the advancing power of Assyria, and to him, as is generally believed, is due the engineering work now famous as the Siloam Tunnel , whereby water was conducted from the spring in the Kidron Valley outside the walls to the reservoir at the bottom of the Tyropœon inside them. At the bottom of the valley, where it joined the Kidron, was the Dung-gate ( Nehemiah 3:15 ), outside of which was found what appears to have been a cess-pit
Mount of Olives - the boundary is sufficiently plainly marked off by the deep valley of the Kidron, while to the E. A viaduct appears to have connected the Mount with the Temple hill, probably on the site of one of the two bridges which to-day span the dry torrent bed of the Kidron. the spectator sees the bare slopes south of the city walls, once thickly covered with the houses of the poor, terminating in the two deep valleys of Kidron and Hinnom, while on the opposite slope some of the houses of Silwân may be distinguished
Jerusalem (2) - It is mentioned in the NT as the ‘brook’ (χείμαρρος) Kidron (John 18:1). , until at Bir Eyyûb it joins the Kidron Valley; the new valley formed by their union runs, under the name of the Wady en-Nâr (the Valley of Fire), down to the Bead Sea. in a somewhat curved direction, dividing the modern city into two unequal halves, and after passing out near the Dung Gate joins the Kidron Valley at the Pool of Siloam. ’ The water arises in a small cave reached by 30 steps, some 25 feet underground, in the Kidron Valley, due south of the Temple area. Such an outflow may last several days, and is a great source of attraction to the people of Jerusalem, who, on the cessation of the rain, hasten out to sit by the ‘flowing Kidron’ and refresh themselves beside its running waters. During the unusually heavy rains of the winter 1904–5 the ‘Kidron’ ran thus four times
Olives - The Mount of Olives was situated to the east of Jerusalem, and divided from the city only by the brook Kidron, and by the valley of Jehoshaphat, which stretches out from the north to the south
Olives, Mount of - On the north a space of nearly a mile of tolerably level surface intervenes between the walls of the city and the rising ground; on the east the mount is close to the walls, parted only by the narrow ravine of the Kidron
Temple, Solomon's - The overflow was led off by a conduit to the Kidron
Jerusalem - extremity at the old wall in the Kidron Valley, i. Little value can be attached to the tradition that the Golden Gate above the Kidron Valley is the gate referred to in Acts 3:2. side of Kidron, is supposed to be his tomb (15th cent. , in the valley of the Kidron, outside St
Mount Mountain - ) lying due east of the Holy City and separated from it by the deep Kidron ravine
Mount Mountain - ) lying due east of the Holy City and separated from it by the deep Kidron ravine
Jerusalem - This was known as the Valley of Kidron or the Valley of Jehoshaphat
Jesus, the Lord - He then crossed the Kidron valley into the garden of Gethsemane
Tomb, Grave, Sepulchre - To prevent desecration by wild beasts, the tombs were often cut in almost inaccessible places; and ancient tombs in the Kidron Valley and in the face of Mount Quarantania are used even now as cells by anchorites, who may be seen climbing by ladders to and from their abodes
Jerusalem - The plateau is related to three valleys—the Kidron on the east, the Hinnom on west and south, and the Tyropoeon which cuts into the lower part of the city dividing it into two unequal parts
Jerusalem - Between the mountains and the city there are valleys on three sides: on the east the valley of the Kidron, or Jehoshaphat; on the west the valley of Gihon; and on the south the valley of Hinnom
Sea - Compare Ezekiel 47:8-10 , where the healing of this deadly sea, and its abounding in fish, as well as the new fertility and beauty of the dreary wilderness between it and Jerusalemby means of the healing power of the Kidron flowing from beside that altar of Godforcibly illustrate the healing and renovating power of gospel grace
Temple - The porch called Solomon's John 10:23 Acts 3:11 , was on the east side or front of this court, and was so called because it was built by this prince, upon a high wall rising from the alley of Kidron
David - The chiefs of his party met at the "Fuller's spring," in the valley of Kidron, to proclaim him king; but Nathan hastened on a decision on the part of David in favour of Solomon, and so the aim of Adonijah's party failed
Golgotha - art ‘Golgotha’) maintained that the site of the Crucifixion was east of the city, between the then existing wall and the Kidron Valley
Jerusalem - Bezetha, "the New City," noticed by Josephus, was separated from Moriah by an artificial ditch, and overlooked the valley of Kidron on the east; this hill was enclosed within the walls of Herod Agrippa
John, Gospel of - As examples we may mention Bethany beyond Jordan ( John 1:28 ), Ænon ( John 3:23 ), Ephraim ( John 11:54 ), the treasury ( John 8:20 ), the pool of Siloam ( John 9:7 ), Solomon’s porch ( John 10:23 ), the Kidron ( John 18:1 )
Jerusalem - The territory and places adjacent were well watered, having the fountains of Gihon and Siloam, and the brook Kidron, at the foot of its walls; and, beside these, there were the waters of Ethan, which Pilate had conveyed through aqueducts into the city