Places Study on Migdol

Places Study on Migdol

Exodus 14: Speak unto the children of Israel, that they turn and encamp before Pihahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, over against Baalzephon: before it shall ye encamp by the sea.
Numbers 33: And they removed from Etham, and turned again unto Pihahiroth, which is before Baalzephon: and they pitched before Migdol.
Jeremiah 44: The word that came to Jeremiah concerning all the Jews which dwell in the land of Egypt, which dwell at Migdol, and at Tahpanhes, and at Noph, and in the country of Pathros, saying,
Jeremiah 46: Declare ye in Egypt, and publish in Migdol, and publish in Noph and in Tahpanhes: say ye, Stand fast, and prepare thee; for the sword shall devour round about thee.

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Migdol

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Migdol
MIGDOL. A Semitic word meaning ‘tower,’ borrowed by the Egyptians of the New Kingdom, and common as a word and in place-names. 1. Exodus 14:2 , Numbers 33:7 , on the border of Egypt, near the spot where the Israelites crossed the Red Sea: probably a mere guardhouse on the road. 2. Ezekiel 29:10 ; Ezekiel 30:6 , where ‘from Migdol to Syene’ is the true reading, instead of ‘from the tower of Seveneh.’ Here Migdol is the N.E. extremity of Egypt, as Seveneh is the S. It may be identical with Magdolo in a Roman Itinerary, perhaps at the now deserted site of Tell el-Her, 12 miles south of Pelusium. 3. In Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14 Migdol is mentioned with Tahpanhes and Noph (Memphis) as a habitation of the Jews, and is probably the same as No. 2.

F. Ll. Griffith.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Migdol
Tower.
A strongly-fortified place 12 miles from Pelusium, in the north of Egypt (Jeremiah 44:1 ; 46:14 ). This word is rendered "tower" in Ezekiel 29:10 , but the margin correctly retains the name Migdol, "from Migdol to Syene;" i.e., from Migdol in the north to Syene in the south, in other words, the whole of Egypt.



A place mentioned in the passage of the Red Sea (Exodus 14:2 ; Numbers 33:7,8 ). It is probably to be identified with Bir Suweis, about 2 miles from Suez.


Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Migdol
("a tower".) Exodus 14:2. Now Bir Suweis, two miles from Suez, having wells of water, for Magdal or Maktal (Migdol), visited by Sethos I returning from a Syrian campaign, was built over a large well (Chabas, Voyage d'un Egyptien, 286). Israel encamped between Migdol and the sea. (See EXODUS.) Migdol thus was between Pihahiroth and Baalzephon. Mentioned also in Jeremiah 44:1; Jeremiah 46:14; Ezekiel 29:10, "I will make Egypt desolate from Migdol (in the extreme N., translated so for 'tower') to Syene" (Seveneh in the farthest S.); so Ezekiel 30:6.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Migdol
(mihg' dahl) Transliteration of Hebrew word meaning, “tower, watchtower, fortress.” A town or a border fortress located in the northeast corner of Egypt. The site is mentioned in reference to two events in biblical history—the Exodus and the Exile. One of the sites on or near the route of the Exodus, Migdol was located near the sites of Pi-hahiroth and Baal-Zephron, all of which were near the sea (Exodus 14:20 . Jewish refugees fled to Migdol during the Exile (Jeremiah 44:1 ). The coming doom of Egypt at the hand of Nebuchadnezzar was to be proclaimed there (Jeremiah 46:13-14 ). Ezekiel prophesied that the land of Egypt would be laid waste, “from Migdol to Aswan” (Ezekiel 29:10 ; Ezekiel 30:6 NIV), that is from the northern extremity of the land, Migdol, to the southern extremity of the land, Aswan.

Since migdol could be used as a proper name, Migdol, or as a common noun, “tower,” two questions remain unresolved. What is the exact location of the site of Migdol? Do all of the references to Migdol refer to the same site, or was there more than one site in Egypt named Migdol? More than one site may have borne the name Migdol, though the evidence we have at hand is inconclusive. The Amarna Letters from Egypt refer to an Egyptian city named Maagdali, but information about its location is not given. See Amarna tell el. For instance a papyrus manuscript mentions the Migdol of Pharoah Seti I. This Migdol was located near Tjeku, the location of which is still debated. Some prefer to identify Tjeku with Succoth, modern-day tell el-Maskhutah, while others identify it with tell el-Her located further north near Pelusium. For this reason we may assume with some certainty that there were at least two sites named Migdol: the Migdol referred to by Jeremiah and Ezekiel located near Pelusium, and the Migdol on the route of the Exodus located near Succoth. Both may have been part of a line of border fortresses or migdols designed to provide protection for Egypt against invasion from the Sinai. See Watchtower, Egypt.

LaMoine DeVries



People's Dictionary of the Bible - Migdol
Migdol (mĭg'dol), tower. 1. A place near the head of the Red Sea. Exodus 14:2; Numbers 33:7; Numbers 8:2. A fortified city in the northern limits of Egypt toward Palestine. Jeremiah 44:1; Jeremiah 46:14. This name is rendered "tower" in the phrase "from the tower of Syene," R. V. reads "Seveneh," Ezekiel 29:10; Ezekiel 30:6; but the margin correctly has "from Migdol to Syene"—i.e., Syene the most southern border of Egypt, and Migdol the most northern.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Migdol
A tower
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Migdol
A tower remarable in Israel's history, to which they arrived soon after their leaving Egypt. (Exodus 14:2) Here it was Israel was commanded to encamp before the sea, where the Lord meant to display such a miracle in opening a way through it for Israel's safety, and the Egyptians, overthrow. And as this was at the very mouth of the sea, namely, Pihahiroth, which signifies the opening of the Foramen, and where Baalzephon, the dunghill god of Egypt, was supposed to watch to catch runaway servants, the Lord here made the triumph more conspicuous in sight of his enemies. (See the history, Exodus 14:1-31 throughout.)

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Migdol
Place near to which the Israelites crossed the Red Sea. Exodus 14:2 ; Numbers 33:7 . Apparently distinct from another Migdol in the north of Egypt. Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14 . In Ezekiel 29:10 , margin , 'from Migdol to Syene' implies from north to south of Egypt.

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Migdol
Moses writes, that when the Israelites came out of Egypt, the Lord commanded them to encamp over against Pihahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, over against Baal-Zephon, Exodus 14:2 . It is not known whether this Migdol was a city, or only a fortress: probably the latter, in which a garrison was stationed.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Migdol
A tower, a frontier town in Northern Egypt towards the Red Sea, Jeremiah 44:1 ; 46:14 ; Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6 . The Hebrews, on leaving Egypt, encamped between it and the sea, Exodus 14:2 ; Numbers 33:7 .

Sentence search

Migdol - One of the sites on or near the route of the Exodus, Migdol was located near the sites of Pi-hahiroth and Baal-Zephron, all of which were near the sea (Exodus 14:20 . Jewish refugees fled to Migdol during the Exile (Jeremiah 44:1 ). Ezekiel prophesied that the land of Egypt would be laid waste, “from Migdol to Aswan” (Ezekiel 29:10 ; Ezekiel 30:6 NIV), that is from the northern extremity of the land, Migdol, to the southern extremity of the land, Aswan. ... Since Migdol could be used as a proper name, Migdol, or as a common noun, “tower,” two questions remain unresolved. What is the exact location of the site of Migdol? Do all of the references to Migdol refer to the same site, or was there more than one site in Egypt named Migdol? More than one site may have borne the name Migdol, though the evidence we have at hand is inconclusive. For instance a papyrus manuscript mentions the Migdol of Pharoah Seti I. This Migdol was located near Tjeku, the location of which is still debated. For this reason we may assume with some certainty that there were at least two sites named Migdol: the Migdol referred to by Jeremiah and Ezekiel located near Pelusium, and the Migdol on the route of the Exodus located near Succoth. Both may have been part of a line of border fortresses or Migdols designed to provide protection for Egypt against invasion from the Sinai
Migdol - Now Bir Suweis, two miles from Suez, having wells of water, for Magdal or Maktal (Migdol), visited by Sethos I returning from a Syrian campaign, was built over a large well (Chabas, Voyage d'un Egyptien, 286). Israel encamped between Migdol and the sea. ) Migdol thus was between Pihahiroth and Baalzephon. Mentioned also in Jeremiah 44:1; Jeremiah 46:14; Ezekiel 29:10, "I will make Egypt desolate from Migdol (in the extreme N
Migdol - Migdol (mĭg'dol), tower. reads "Seveneh," Ezekiel 29:10; Ezekiel 30:6; but the margin correctly has "from Migdol to Syene"—i. , Syene the most southern border of Egypt, and Migdol the most northern
Migdol - This word is rendered "tower" in Ezekiel 29:10 , but the margin correctly retains the name Migdol, "from Migdol to Syene;" i. , from Migdol in the north to Syene in the south, in other words, the whole of Egypt
Migdol - Apparently distinct from another Migdol in the north of Egypt. In Ezekiel 29:10 , margin , 'from Migdol to Syene' implies from north to south of Egypt
Migdol - Moses writes, that when the Israelites came out of Egypt, the Lord commanded them to encamp over against Pihahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, over against Baal-Zephon, Exodus 14:2 . It is not known whether this Migdol was a city, or only a fortress: probably the latter, in which a garrison was stationed
Migdol - Migdol. Ezekiel 29:10 ; Ezekiel 30:6 , where ‘from Migdol to Syene’ is the true reading, instead of ‘from the tower of Seveneh. ’ Here Migdol is the N. In Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14 Migdol is mentioned with Tahpanhes and Noph (Memphis) as a habitation of the Jews, and is probably the same as No
Mig'Dol -
A Migdol is mentioned int he account of the exodus, (Exodus 14:2 ; Numbers 33:7,8 ) near the head of the Red Sea. ... A Migdol is spoken of by Jeremiah and Ezekiel. (Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6 ) In the prophecy of Jeremiah the Jews in Egypt are spoken of as dwelling at Migdol
Baal Zephon - Migdol and Baal Zephon were opposite one another, Baal Zephon being behind Pihahiroh in relation to the Israelites. Gesenius explains the name is sacred to Typhon; others from the root tsaphah , "to watch" equating to "watchtower," as Migdol also means "tower
Pihahiroth - ... Israel encamped "before Pihahiroth between Migdol and the sea" (Exodus 14:2). of the Bitter Lakes, dose to Migdol, on its N. side, Migdol being on the N
Migdal-el - The meaning of the name is very plain, from Migdol, tower—and El, God, the tower of God
Syene - " It was the frontier town of Egypt in the south, as Migdol was in the north-east
Magdala - Migdol implies a tower, or fortress; and this place, from having this name particularly applied to it, was doubtless, like the Egyptian Migdol, one of considerable importance; and may be considered as the site of the Migdal of the Naphtalites, as well as the Magdala of the New Testament
Syene - The expression, 'from the tower of Syene,' is better translated 'from Migdol to Syene,' even unto the border of Ethiopia, as it is in the margin
pi-Hahiroth - It was ‘between Migdol and the sea, before Baal-zephon’ ( Exodus 14:9 )
Syene - "From Migdol to Syene," i
Syene - "From Migdol," the tower, "unto Syene," denotes the whole length of Egypt from north to south, Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6
Pihahiroth - At this place the Egyptians had a Migdol or tower, and one of their dunghill gods, called Baal-Zephon, had a temple here, as if to watch that no runaway servant or slave might escape from Egypt; at least, it was intended to act as a bugbear to deliver the fugitive
Magdala - The name Mary "Magdalene" shows there was a "Magdala" probably a later form of Migdol, "a tower
Syene - Ezekiel 29:10 , describing the desolation to be brought upon Egypt, says, "Therefore thus saith the Lord, Behold, I will make the land of Egypt utterly desolate, from the tower of Syene even to the border of Cush," or Arabia or, as some read it, "from Migdol to Syene," implying, according to either version of the passage, the whole length of the country from north to south
Tahpanhes - Of the same materials, Jeremiah foretells, should the substructure of Nebuchadnezzar's throne be built, implying that Nebuchadnezzar's throne should be raised on the downfall of Pharaoh's throne: Jeremiah 46:14, "publish in Migdol (E
Tower - (Genesis 35:21) The Migdol at Pihahiroth. The Hebrews called every tower by the general name of Migdol
Baal-Zephon - And Migdol, which means a tower, was a watch-place, where it is probable that this idol was placed to watch, or pretend to watch, at the extremity of the kingdom of Egypt, on this part to the sea, by way of deterring runaway servants, or slaves, like Israel, from attempting their escape
ir-ha-Heres - " Some think the five are Heliopolis, Leontopolis, Migdol, Daphne (Tahpanhes), and Memphis
Goshen - ) The names of sonic places in Goshen are Semitic, as Migdol and Baal-zephon
Exodus, the - ... The people were led from Rameses to Succoth, thence to Etham, and to Pi-hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, over against Baal-zephon
Dispersion - In this general period colonies of Jews were living at Memphis, Migdol, Tahpanhes, and Pathros in Egypt (Jeremiah 44:1 )
Red Sea - Instead of proceeding from Etham, round the head of the Red Sea, and coasting along its eastern shore, the Lord made them turn southward along its western shore, and, after a stage of about twenty or thirty miles, to encamp in the valley of Bedea, where there was an opening in the great chain of mountains that line the western coast, called Pi-hahiroth, the mouth of the ridge between Migdol westward, and the sea eastward, "over against Baal-zephon," on the eastern coast; to tempt Pharaoh, whose heart he finally hardened, to pursue them when they were "entangled in the land," and shut in by the wilderness on their rear and flanks, and by the sea in their front. So Pharaoh pursued the Israelites by the direct way of Migdol, with six hundred chariots, his horsemen, and his army, and overtook them encamping by the sea, beside Pi-hahiroth, over against Baal-zephon. The day before the passage, by the divine command, the Israelites encamped beside Pi-hahiroth "between Migdol and the sea, over against Baal-zephon,"... Exodus 14:2 ; Numbers 33:7 . Pi-hahiroth signifies "the mouth of the ridge," or chain of mountains, which line the western coast of the Red Sea, called Attaka, "deliverance," in which was a gap, which formed the extremity of the valley of Bedea, ending at the sea eastward, and running westward to some distance, toward Cairo; Migdol, signifying "a tower," probably lay in that direction; and Baal-zephon, signifying "the northern Baal," was probably a temple on the opposite promontory, built on the eastern coast of the Red Sea
Magdala - A watch-tower on the north border of the town is a present suggestion of the derivation of the name Mejdel or its Greek form Migdol
Exodus - Here they were commanded "to turn and encamp before Pi-hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea", i
Red Sea - It appears that Migdol was behind Pi-hahiroth and on the other hand Baalzephon and the sea
Egypt - The prophet Ezekiel describes Egypt as extending from Migdol, that is, Magdolum, not far from the mouth of the Pelusian arm, to Syene, now Essuan, namely, to the border of Ethiopia, Ezekiel 29:10 30:6
Egypt - Ezekiel indicates that Egypt reached from Migdol, east of the Suez Canal, to Syene, now Assouan, on the border of Nubia, near the First Cataract of the Nile
Egypt - " Egypt should be made desolate from Migdol to Syene (margin ), even to the border of Ethiopia (from the north to the south) 'forty years
Egypt - It extended from Migdol (near Pelusium, N
Egypt - Of localities in Upper Egypt only Syene and Thebes (No) are mentioned; in Middle Egypt, Hanes; while on the eastern border and the route to Memphis (Noph) are Shihor, Shur, Sin, Migdol, Tahpanhes, Pi-beseth, On; and by the southern route, Goshen, Pithom, Succoth, Rameses, besides lesser places in the Exodus