Places Study on Moreh

Places Study on Moreh

Genesis 12: And Abram passed through the land unto the place of Sichem, unto the plain of Moreh. And the Canaanite was then in the land.
Deuteronomy 11: Are they not on the other side Jordan, by the way where the sun goeth down, in the land of the Canaanites, which dwell in the champaign over against Gilgal, beside the plains of Moreh?
Judges 7: Then Jerubbaal, who is Gideon, and all the people that were with him, rose up early, and pitched beside the well of Harod: so that the host of the Midianites were on the north side of them, by the hill of Moreh, in the valley.

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Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Moreh,
MOREH , the Hiphil participle from yârâh , means ‘teacher’ or ‘one who gives direction’ ( 2 Kings 17:28 , Isaiah 30:20 etc.), and so is applied to a prophet ( Isaiah 9:15 ). Sitting in the shelter of a sacred tree, the priest or seer delivered his direction or’ oracles.’ 1. The terebinth (AV [Note: Authorized Version.] , wrongly, ‘plain’) of Moreh ( Genesis 12:6 ) may have been so named from the theophany vouchsafed to Abraham there. The same spot may be indicated by the terebinths of Moreh ( Deuteronomy 11:30 ), mentioned as indicating the position of Ebal and Gerizim. From their conjunction with Gilgal it has been suggested that the gilgal (‘stone circle’) and the terebinths were parts of the same sanctuary. There may be a reference to this place in Genesis 35:4 , in Joshua 24:26 , possibly also in Judges 9:6 . Gilgal ( Deuteronomy 11:30 ) may be Khirbet Juleijel , fully 1 1 / 2 mile E. of Jacob’s Well. But this would not fix with certainty the position of the sanctuary of the terebinth.

2. The hill of Moreh ( Judges 7:1 ) seems to have lain to the N. of the position occupied by Gideon, in the direction of the camp of the Midianites. Taking the narrative as it stands, the Midianites ‘pitched in the valley of Jezreel’ ( Judges 6:33 ), while Gideon held the lower spurs of Gilboa towards Jezreel. ‘The spring of Harod’ is with some probability identified with ‘Ain Jalûd . The conspicuous hill on the other side of the vale, Jebel ed-Duhy , popularly now called Little Hermon, round the W. flanks of which, and northward in the plain, the Midianites would spread, may be almost certainly identified with the Hill of Moreh. The article with Moreh suggests the presence of a sanctuary on the hill. This may be represented by the modern shrine of Neby Duhy . Questions have been raised by the condition of the Heb. text, but no more probable identification has been suggested. Cf. Moreh.

W. Ewing.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Moreh
An archer, teacher; fruitful.
A Canaanite probably who inhabited the district south of Shechem, between Mounts Ebal and Gerizim, and gave his name to the "plain" there (Genesis 12:6 ). Here at this "plain," or rather (RSV) "oak," of Moreh, Abraham built his first altar in the land of Palestine; and here the Lord appeared unto him. He afterwards left this plain and moved southward, and pitched his tent between Bethel on the west and Hai on the east (Genesis 12:7,8 ).


Easton's Bible Dictionary - Moreh, the Hill of
Probably identical with "little Hermon," the modern Jebel ed-Duhy, or perhaps one of the lower spurs of this mountain. It is a gray ridge parallel to Gilboa on the north; and between the two lay the battle-field, the plain of Jezreel (q.v.), where Gideon overthrew the Midianites (Judges 7:1-12 ).

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Moreh
1. "The plains," rather "the oaks" or "terebinths" of Moreh. Abram's first halting place in Canaan, near Shechem and Ebal and Gerizim mountains (Genesis 12:6); here he erected his first altar. "Morthia," on ancient coins, a title of Shechem, preserves the name Moreh. Under the same "oak" Jacob hid his household's idols (Genesis 35:4). Here Joshua set up a great stone by the sanctuary of Jehovah (Joshua 24:26, compare Deuteronomy 11:30).

2. THE HILL OF MOREH. At its foot Midian and Amalek encamped before Gideon's attack (Judges 6:33; Judges 7:1). On the northern side of the valley of Jezreel, and of the height where Gideon's 300 were; jebel ed Duhy, "little Hermon," answers to Moreh. Two or three miles intervene (enough for Midian's and Amalek's hosts) between Moreh and ain Jalood, the spring of "Harod" at the foot of Gideon's hill, jebel Fukua (Gilboa).

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Moreh
Moreh (mô'reh). 1. The halting place of Abram after his entrance into the land of Canaan. Genesis 12:6. It was near Shechem, Genesis 12:1-20; Genesis 6:1-22, and the mountains Ebal and Gerizim. Deuteronomy 11:30. 2. The hill of Moreh, where the Midianites and Amalekites were encamped before Gideon's attack upon them. Judges 7:1. It lay in the valley of Jezreel, on the north side.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Moreh
(moh' reh) Place name meaning, “instruction” or “archers.” 1. Place where several important events in the lives of the patriarchs and the nation Israel occurred. An oak tree at the site is mentioned several times as being the focal point. Abraham's first encampment in the land of Canaan was at Moreh. There he built an altar after God had appeared to him and entered into covenant (Genesis 12:6-7 ). Jacob buried there the foreign gods his family had brought from Haran (Genesis 35:4 ).

At Moreh God pronounced the blessing and curse on Israel regarding their keeping the commandments (Deuteronomy 11:26-30 ). Joshua set up a memorial stone under the oak as a reminder of the covenant made between God and the people (Joshua 24:26 ).

2. Hill in tribal territory of Issachar where Gideon reduced his troops by testing the way they drank water (Judges 7:1 ). Modern Nebi Dachi opposite Mount Gilboa.



Chabad Knowledge Base - Moreh shiur
table indicating the exact passages to be studied in various daily study courses

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Moreh, Hill of
Place where the Midianites encamped before they were attacked by Gideon. Judges 7:1 . It is supposed to have been what is now called Neby Duhy, or 'Little Hermon,' 32 37' N, 35 20' E . It is 1,690 feet high.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Moreh, Plain of
The Hebrew signifies the 'oak, or oaks, of Moreh.' It was near Shechem, where Abram first pitched his tent on entering Canaan, and where the Lord appeared to him. Genesis 12:6 ; Deuteronomy 11:30 .

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Moreh
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Moreh - "The plains," rather "the oaks" or "terebinths" of Moreh. "Morthia," on ancient coins, a title of Shechem, preserves the name Moreh. THE HILL OF Moreh. On the northern side of the valley of Jezreel, and of the height where Gideon's 300 were; jebel ed Duhy, "little Hermon," answers to Moreh. Two or three miles intervene (enough for Midian's and Amalek's hosts) between Moreh and ain Jalood, the spring of "Harod" at the foot of Gideon's hill, jebel Fukua (Gilboa)
Moreh, - Moreh , the Hiphil participle from yârâh , means ‘teacher’ or ‘one who gives direction’ ( 2 Kings 17:28 , Isaiah 30:20 etc. ] , wrongly, ‘plain’) of Moreh ( Genesis 12:6 ) may have been so named from the theophany vouchsafed to Abraham there. The same spot may be indicated by the terebinths of Moreh ( Deuteronomy 11:30 ), mentioned as indicating the position of Ebal and Gerizim. The hill of Moreh ( Judges 7:1 ) seems to have lain to the N. flanks of which, and northward in the plain, the Midianites would spread, may be almost certainly identified with the Hill of Moreh. The article with Moreh suggests the presence of a sanctuary on the hill. Moreh
mo'Reh -
The plain or plains (or, as it should rather be rendered, the oak or oaks) of Moreh. The oak of Moreh was the first recorded halting-place of Abram after his entrance into the land of Canaan. (11:30) ... The hill of Moreh, at the foot of which the Midianites and Amalekites were encamped before Gideon's attack upon them. These conditions are most accurately fulfilled if we assume Jebel ed-Duhy , the "Little Hermon" of the modern travellers, 1815 feet above the Mediterranean, to be Moreh, the Ain-Jalood to be the spring of Harod, and Gideon's position to have been on the northeast slope of Jebel Fukua (Mount Gilboa), between the village of Nuris and the last-mentioned spring
Moreh - Moreh (mô'reh). The hill of Moreh, where the Midianites and Amalekites were encamped before Gideon's attack upon them
Moreh, Plain of - The Hebrew signifies the 'oak, or oaks, of Moreh
Harod - It was south of the hill Moreh
Moreh - Abraham's first encampment in the land of Canaan was at Moreh. ... At Moreh God pronounced the blessing and curse on Israel regarding their keeping the commandments (Deuteronomy 11:26-30 )
Harod, the Well of - " Now Ain Jalud; the hill Moreh is Jebel Duhy, From it two of David's 37 warriors of the body guard are called each "the HARODITE," namely, SHAMMAH and ELIKA (2 Samuel 23:25)
Moreh - Here at this "plain," or rather (RSV) "oak," of Moreh, Abraham built his first altar in the land of Palestine; and here the Lord appeared unto him
Nain - It is identified with the village called Nein, standing on the north-western slope of Jebel ed-Duhy (=the "hill Moreh" = "Little hermon"), about 4 miles from Tabor and 25 southwest of Capernaum
Gibeath - ; see Moreh, 2 )
Jezreel, Valley of - Lying on the northern side of the city, between the ridges of Gilboa and Moreh, an offshoot of Esdraelon, running east to the Jordan (Joshua 17:16 ; Judges 6:33 ; Hosea 1:5 )
Ophrah - Suggested sites include et-Taiyibeh south of modern Tulkarm, et-Taiyibeh (Afula) on the Plain of Esdraelon west of Mount Moreh, and Fer'ata west of Mount Gerazim near Shechem
Oak - The place here referred to is called Allon-Moreh ("the oak of Moreh," as in RSV) in Genesis 12:6,35:4
Rain - There are three Hebrew words used to denote the rains of different seasons,
Yoreh (Hosea 6:3 ), or Moreh (Joel 2:23 ), denoting the former or the early rain
Mori'ah - ( Genesis 22:2 ) Its position is doubtful, some thinking it to be Mount MOriah, others that Moreh , near Shechem, is meant
Mount Gerizim - (Deuteronomy 11:29-30) There should seem to have been a special design in this appointment of the Lord by Moses; for here it was, beside the plains of Moreh, that Abraham first came, at the call of God, when he left Haran
Jehovah Jireh - It is no valid objection that Abraham "saw the place afar off," whereas the temple mount is not conspicuous from a distance (whence Moriah is connected by some with Moreh and "the natural altar on the top of Mount Gerizim", which the Samaritans make the place of the sacrifice); for what is meant in Genesis 22:4 is only that he saw it at some little distance, as far off as the place admitted
Hill, Hill-Country - ‘Gibeah of Saul,’ ‘of Phinehas,’ ‘of the foreskins,’ ‘of Moreh,’ ‘of Hachilah,’ ‘of Ammah,’ ‘of Gareb,’ and ‘of Elohim
Nain - slope of the Hill of Moreh, the so-called ‘Little Hermon
Gilgal - It was "beside the oaks of Moreh," near which Abraham erected his first altar (Genesis 12:6,7 )
Plains - They regard the word as meaning an "oak" or "grove of oaks," a rendering supported by nearly all the commentators and lexicographers of the present day, The passages in which the word occurs erroneously translated "plain" are as-follows: Plain of Moreh, ( Genesis 12:6 ; 11:30) plain of Mamre, (Genesis 13:18 ; 14:13 ; 18:1 ) plain of Zaanaim, (Judges 4:11 ) plain of the pillar, (Judges 9:6 ) plain of Meonenim, (Judges 9:37 ) plain of Tabor, (1 Samuel 10:5 )
Moriah - There is some similarity between the names Moriah and Moreh , the latter of which was at Shechem ( Genesis 12:6 , Deuteronomy 11:30 ), close to the hills Gerizim and Ebal
Gideon - These, strangely armed with torches and pitchers and trumpets, rushed in from three different points on the camp of Midian at midnight, in the valley to the north of Moreh, with the terrible war-cry, "For the Lord and for Gideon" (Judges 7:18 , RSV)
Moriah - Abraham saw Moriah at some little distance (Genesis 22:4) on the third day; the distance, two days' journey from Beersheba, would just bring him to Zion, but not so far as Moreh and Gerizim (Genesis 12:6) where some fix Moriah
Ebal - of Gerizim and on the brow of lofty hills, a suitable landmark, 2 Kings 2:1-2), "and beside the oaks (not 'plains,' but terebinths) of Moreh. " These "terebinths of Moreh" near Shechem were familiar to the people, as marking the spot where Abraham first entered the land (Genesis 12:6)
Shechem - , in the roll of the law of Moses; and in memory of this solemn transaction a great stone was set up "under an oak" (Compare Genesis 28:18 ; 31:44-48 ; Exodus 24:4 ; Joshua 4:3,8,9 ), possibly the old "oak of Moreh," as a silent witness of the transaction to all coming time
Grove - The Hebrew word translated "plain" (elon ) signifies a grove or plantation; that of Mamre (Genesis 13:18), of Moreh (Genesis 12:6), of Zaanaim (Judges 4:11), of the pillar in Shechem (Judges 9:6), of Meonenim (Judges 9:37), of Tabor (1 Samuel 10:3)
Heifer - -Maimonides, Moreh, iii
Gilgal - in the land of the Canaanites, which dwell in the champaign over against Gilgal, beside the plains of Moreh?" This does not at all agree with any of the above, but has not been identified with any place in the neighbourhood of the two mountains
Abram - He passed through the heart of the country by the great highway to Shechem, and pitched his tent by the oak of Moreh. Removing from Moreh he pitched on a mount to the east of Bethel, and journeying south he went down into Egypt (famine then afflicting Canaan), establishing there the first link of that mysterious chain which so long, through almost all their history, bound the chosen people for discipline and for warning to the Egyptians
Gilgal - Gilgal not far from Shechem, beside the plains of Moreh (Deuteronomy 11:30)
She'Chem - Abraham, on his first migration to the land of promise, pitched his tent and built an altar under the oak (or terebinth) of Moreh at Shechem
a'Braham - He passed through the heart of the country by the great highway to Shechem, and pitched his tent beneath the terebinth of Moreh
Abraham - Scripture records nothing further than that his chief servant was Eliezer of Damascus; he pursued Chedorlaomer to Hobah, on the left of Damascus, subsequently (Genesis 14:15), Abraham entered Canaan along the valley of the Jabbok, and encamped first in the rich Moreh valley, near Sichem, between mounts Ebal and Gerizim. chosen by Jehovah); others suppose Moreh, three days' journey from Beersheba
Shechem (1) - ... Here first in Canaan God appeared to Abraham (Genesis 12:6), and here he pitched his tent and built an altar under the oak or terebinth (not "plain") of Moreh; here too Jacob re-entered the promised land (Genesis 33:18-19), and "bought a parcel of a field where he had spread his tent," from the children of Hamor, Shechem's father, and bequeathed it subsequently to Joseph (Genesis 48:22; Joshua 24:32; John 4:5); a dwelling place, whereas Abraham's only purchase was a burial place
Abraham - Passing along the valley of the Jabbok, in the land of Canaan, he formed his first encampment at Sichem (Genesis 12:6 ), in the vale or oak-grove of Moreh, between Ebal on the north and Gerizim on the south
Zebedee - Little Hermon—the Hill of Moreh—and Gideon’s fountain (Judges 7:1) would recall the ‘day of Midian’; while Gilboa would bring thoughts of Israel’s darker days, and Jezreel memories of sad declension in the time of Ahab
Samaria, Samaritans - They were, indeed, accused by the Rabbis of worshipping a dove on Gerizim (Cholin 6a), and also of worshipping the idols Jacob buried (Genesis 35:4) under the oak of Moreh (Ber. That mountain is beyond Jordan after the way from the rising of the sun, in the land of the Canaanite, who dwelleth in the West, over against Gilgal, near by the oak of Moreh, over against Shechem
High Place, Sanctuary - The holy places which figure so conspicuously in the stories of the patriarchs are in many cases tree-sanctuaries of immemorial antiquity, such as ‘the terebinth of Moreh,’ at Shechem, under which Abram is said to have built his first altar in Canaan ( Genesis 12:6 f