Places Study on Mount Hermon

Places Study on Mount Hermon

Deuteronomy 3: And we took at that time out of the hand of the two kings of the Amorites the land that was on this side Jordan, from the river of Arnon unto mount Hermon;
Joshua 11: Even from the mount Halak, that goeth up to Seir, even unto Baalgad in the valley of Lebanon under mount Hermon: and all their kings he took, and smote them, and slew them.
Joshua 12: Now these are the kings of the land, which the children of Israel smote, and possessed their land on the other side Jordan toward the rising of the sun, from the river Arnon unto mount Hermon, and all the plain on the east:
Joshua 12: And reigned in mount Hermon, and in Salcah, and in all Bashan, unto the border of the Geshurites and the Maachathites, and half Gilead, the border of Sihon king of Heshbon.
Joshua 13: And the land of the Giblites, and all Lebanon, toward the sunrising, from Baalgad under mount Hermon unto the entering into Hamath.
Joshua 13: And Gilead, and the border of the Geshurites and Maachathites, and all mount Hermon, and all Bashan unto Salcah;
1 Chronicles 5: And the children of the half tribe of Manasseh dwelt in the land: they increased from Bashan unto Baalhermon and Senir, and unto mount Hermon.

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Mount Hermon

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1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mount Hermon
(Hebrew: sacred)

Group of mountains in Palestine forming the southern extremity of Anti-Lebanon, marking on the east of the Jordan the northern boundary of Israel.

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Mount Hermon
This was called by the Sidonians Sirion, and the Amorites calked it Shenir, (Deuteronomy 3:9.) Its height was very great, and always covered with snow. The faithful in the Old Testament celebrated the beauties of Hermon in their songs. It was situated so near the temple, that it formed a part of it; indeed Zion is called Hermon. (Deuteronomy 4:28.) See Hermon.

Sentence search

Shenir - Hebrew senir , the Amorite name for Mount Hermon. (See SENIR; Mount Hermon
Baal-Hermon -
A city near Mount Hermon inhabited by the Ephraimites (1 Chronicles 5:23 ). Probably it may be the same as Mount Hermon, or one of its three peaks
Sirion - (ssihr' ee ahn) Sidonian name for Mount Hermon (Deuteronomy 3:9 )
se'Nir - (snow mountain ), ( 1 Chronicles 5:23 ; Ezekiel 27:5 ) the Amorite name for Mount Hermon
Hermonite - (huhr' muhn ite) Resident of Mount Hermon, according to KJV translation of Psalm 42:6
Lebanon, Tower of - Only mentioned symbolically in Song of Solomon 7:4 : it is supposed to refer to Mount Hermon
Shenir - =Senir, (Deuteronomy 3:9 ; Song of Solomon 4:8 ), the name given to Mount Hermon (q
Senir - A name given to Mount Hermon by the Amorites, Deuteronomy 3:9 1 Chronicles 5:23 Ezekiel 27:5
Mount Baal-Hermon - (bay' uhl huhr' muhn) A variant name for Mount Hermon (Judges 3:3 ), perhaps indicating its use as a worship place for Baal
Sion, Mount - A name of Mount Hermon
Baalhermon - Town or mount in connection with Mount Hermon: there was probably a shrine of Baal there: see BAAL-GAD
Baalgad - Place at the foot of Mount Hermon in the valley of Lebanon, the northern limit of Joshua's conquest
Hermonites - KJV translators understood the Hebrew plural “Hermans” (Psalm 42:6 ) to refer to the inhabitants of the slopes of Mount Hermon
Sion -
Denotes Mount Hermon in Deuteronomy 4:48 ; called Sirion by the Sidonians, and by the Amorites Shenir (Deuteronomy 3:9 )
Pharpar - The river is perhaps the Nahr el A'waj which flows from Mount Hermon, passing about ten miles south of Damascus, or else the Nahr Taura
Sir'Ion - (breastplate ), one of the various names of Mount Hermon, that by which it was known to the Zidonians
Hermonites - This occurs only in Psalm 42:6 , which is translated by some, "I remember thee from the land of Jordan, and of the Hermons, from the hill Mizar;" the reference being, not to any people called Hermonites, but to the peaks of Mount Hermon
Baal Hermon - Judges 3:3; 1 Chronicles 5:23 (translate Baal Hermon, even Senir, even Mount Hermon
si'on -
One of the various names of Mount Hermon
Senir - ” Amorite name for Mount Hermon (Deuteronomy 3:9 )
Snow - Yet Mount Hermon has a snow cap that can be seen throughout much of Palestine
Baal-Gad - ” Town representing northern limit of Joshua's conquests (Joshua 11:17 ) in Valley of Lebanon at foot of Mount Hermon
Kadmonites - It has been conjectured that the celebrated Cadmus, the founder of Thebes in Boeotia, was originally a Kadmonite; and that his wife, Hermione, was so named from Mount Hermon
Avims - Lastly, there were some of them beyond Jordan, at the foot of Mount Hermon. ... The name of his wife Hermione was taken from Mount Hermon, at the foot whereof the Hivites dwelt
Kadmonites - Genesis 15:19 , a tribe of Canaanites who inhabited the promised land east of the Jordan, about Mount Hermon
Ituraea - Stretching from Mount Hermon toward the N. The tribe of Manasseh wrested it from the Hagrites (Ishmaelites), Jetur, Nephish, and Nodab, and "increased from Bashan unto Baal Hermon and Senir, and unto Mount Hermon"; i
Abana - Its modern name is Barada, and it travels swiftly from snow-capped Mount Hermon through Damascus to end in a marsh
Og - He is described as lord over "the remnant of the Raphaims who dwelt in Astaroth, and in Edrai, and had dominion in Mount Hermon, and in Salecha, and in all Basan
Geshur - Bridge, the name of a district or principality of Syria near Gilead, between Mount Hermon and the Lake of Tiberias (2 Samuel 15:8 ; 1 Chronicles 2:23 )
Iturae'a - (land of Jether ), a small province on the northwestern border of Palestine, lying along the base of Mount Hermon, only mentioned in ( Luke 3:1 ) Jetur the son of Ishmael gave his name like the rest of his brethren, to the little province he colonized
Geshur, Geshuri, Geshurites - Geshur lay upon the eastern side of the Jordan between Bashan, Maachah, and Mount Hermon, and within the limits of the Hebrew territory; but the Israelites did not expel its inhabitants, Joshua 12:5 ; 13:13 . The word Geshur signifies bridge; and in the border of the region, where, according to the above data, we must place Geshur, between Mount Hermon and the lake of Tiberias, there still exists an ancient stone bridge of four arches over the Jordan, called Jisr-Beni-Jakub, that is, the bridge of the children of Jacob
Beth-Rehob - The town lay at the southern foot of Mount Hermon
Baal Gad - "Under Mount Hermon, in the valley of Lebanon," still retaining the Hebrew name for "the valley," 'el buka , between Lebanon and Antilebanon
Baal Gad - "Under Mount Hermon, in the valley of Lebanon," still retaining the Hebrew name for "the valley," 'el buka , between Lebanon and Antilebanon
Hermon - Mount Hermon was in the far north of Palestine, at the southern end of the Lebanon Range
Dan Name - Because it was so restricted the tribe moved to Lais, a city in Palestine on the slope of Mount Hermon, which they destroyed and rebuilt and called Dan (Judges 18)
Jordan River - It issues from three sources on Mount Hermon, and after a course of 200 miles empties into the Dead Sea
River, Jordan - It issues from three sources on Mount Hermon, and after a course of 200 miles empties into the Dead Sea
Lysanias - side of Mount Hermon
Maacah - Between Bashan and the kingdom of Damascus, on the skirts of Mount Hermon, E
Caesarea Philippi - It was situated at the foot of Mount Hermon, near the head of the Jordan; and was about fifty miles from Damascus, and thirty from Tyre
Lebanon - In the latter, Mount Hermon reaches the height of 9300 feet Lebanon is often mentioned poetically in the Old Testament (Osee 14; Nahum 1), and is noted for its abundance of wood, especially the cedar (Zachariah 11; 1 Esdras 3), which was used by Solomon in building the Temple (3Kings 5)
Libanus - In the latter, Mount Hermon reaches the height of 9300 feet Lebanon is often mentioned poetically in the Old Testament (Osee 14; Nahum 1), and is noted for its abundance of wood, especially the cedar (Zachariah 11; 1 Esdras 3), which was used by Solomon in building the Temple (3Kings 5)
Mountain, White - In the latter, Mount Hermon reaches the height of 9300 feet Lebanon is often mentioned poetically in the Old Testament (Osee 14; Nahum 1), and is noted for its abundance of wood, especially the cedar (Zachariah 11; 1 Esdras 3), which was used by Solomon in building the Temple (3Kings 5)
Harmon - ” Some Bible students change the first letter slightly to read, “Mount Hermon
White Mountain - In the latter, Mount Hermon reaches the height of 9300 feet Lebanon is often mentioned poetically in the Old Testament (Osee 14; Nahum 1), and is noted for its abundance of wood, especially the cedar (Zachariah 11; 1 Esdras 3), which was used by Solomon in building the Temple (3Kings 5)
Transfiguration, the - The place of the transfiguration was probably Mount Hermon (q
Caesare'a Philip'pi - The spring rises from and the city was built on a limestone terrace in a valley at the base of Mount Hermon 20 miles north of the Sea of Galilee
Lasha - The gorge of wady el Asal, descending from Mount Hermon over against Laish, between two high bulwarks, fulfills the requirements of the derivation
Hermon - Mount Hermon is believed to be what is now known as Jebel esh-Sheikh, whose highest summit, surpassing every other in Syria, rises into the region of perpetual snow or ice, ten thousand feet above the sea
Hor - The location is unknown, though some would see Hor as a variant name for Mount Hermon
Tabor - Tradition makes this the mount of Transfiguration; but it is more probable that some part of Mount Hermon was chosen for the transfiguration
c Sarea-Philippi - Cæsarea-Philippi (sĕs-a-rç'ah-fĭ-lĭp'pî), now called Banias by the Arabs, is a town at the base of Mount Hermon, about 20 miles north of the Sea of Galilee and 45 miles southwest of Damascus
Mizpah or Mizpeh - A valley near Mount Hermon, towards Zidon, Joshua 11:3,8
ba'Shan - It extended from the "border of Gilead" on the south to Mount Hermon on the north, (3:3,10,14; Joshua 12:5 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ) and from the Arabah or Jordan valley on the west to Salchah (Sulkhad ) and the border of the Geshurites and the Maachathites on the east
Maacah - son of Nahor, Abraham's brother (Genesis 22:24 ); this Maacah perhaps gave his name to the Aramean kingdom west of Basham and southwest of Mount Hermon; the residents of this kingdom, the Maachathites (ma a thites), were not driven out during the Israelite conquest of Canaan (Joshua 13:13 )
Nebo - It rises over 4000 feet above the Dead Sea and gives an excellent view of the southwest, west, and as far north as Mount Hermon
Caesara Philippi - A city on the northeast of the marshy plain of el-Huleh, 120 miles north of Jerusalem, and 20 miles north of the Sea of Galilee, at the "upper source" of the Jordan, and near the base of Mount Hermon
Transfiguration - ... Early writers fixed on Mount Tabor as the Mount of Transfiguration; but it is more probable that it was on some part of Mount Hermon, which would have been more private
Transfiguration - Though tradition locates the transfiguration on Mount Tabor, there is little to confirm this view, and modern scholars favor some spur of Mount Hermon, Jesus frequently went to the mountains to spend the night In prayer
Manas'Seh - (Joshua 13:29-33 ) Here they throve exceedingly, pushing their way northward over the rich plains of Jaulan and Jedur to the foot of Mount Hermon
Maacah or Maachah - A city and region of Syria or Aram, 1 Chronicles 19:6 ; somewhere near the foot of Mount Hermon, and Geshur
Manas'Seh - (Joshua 13:29-33 ) Here they throve exceedingly, pushing their way northward over the rich plains of Jaulan and Jedur to the foot of Mount Hermon
Lebanon - Its highest point is Mount Hermon
Dan - Dan was seated at the foot of Mount Hermon, four miles west of Paneas, near one source of the Jordan, on a hill now called Tell-el-Kady
Merom - On the west it is walled in by the steep and lofty range of the hills of Kedesh-Naphtali; on the east it is bounded by the lower and more gradually ascending slopes of Bashan; on the north it is shut in by a line of hills hummocky and irregular in shape and of no great height, and stretching across from the mountains of Naphtali to the roots of Mount Hermon, which towers up at the north-eastern angle of the plain to a height of 10,000 feet
Gilead or Galeed - Genesis 31:45-48 , the mound of witness, lay east of the Jordan, in the mountainous tract which runs from Mount Hermon southward, between the Jordan and Arabia Deserta
Merom - It is situated in the southern part of a valley formed by the two branches of Mount Hermon
Mizpah - ... Other places in Palestine named Mizpah were near Mount Hermon in the far north (Joshua 11:3), in Gilead east of Jordan (Judges 10:17; Judges 11:11; Judges 11:29; Judges 11:34), and in the low foothills west of the central highlands (Joshua 15:38)
Trachonitis - limit extended to the districts of Ulatha and Paneas, at the southern base of Mount Hermon; and also that it bordered on Auranitis (en-Nukra) and Batanaea (Ant
Bashan - Now best known for the Golan Heights, it is a large district on the east of the Jordan, having Gilead on the south and extending northward to Mount Hermon; westward to the Jordan valley, and eastward nearly as far as 37 E
Lebanon - Mount Hermon is its southern point
Dan - Hence they had another portion granted them, near Mount Hermon, Judges 18:1-31, where they set up a graven image stolen from Micah 3:1-12
Jordan River - It rises from the foot of Mount Hermon and flows into the Dead Sea. They all arise at the foothills of Mount Hermon
Weather - Snow covers the higher elevations of Mount Hermon throughout most of the winter and occasionally falls on Jerusalem and the surrounding hills
Galilee - " In the time of our Lord, Galilee embraced more than one-third of Western Palestine, extending "from Dan on the north, at the base of Mount Hermon, to the ridges of Carmel and Gilboa on the south, and from the Jordan valley on the east away across the splendid plains of Jezreel and Acre to the shores of the Mediterranean on the west
Lebanon - One summit, however, in the eastern range, namely, Mount Hermon, now called Jebel-esh-Sheikh, is higher still, and rises nearly into the region of perpetual ice
Mizpah - ... ... Another place in Gilead, at the foot of Mount Hermon, inhabited by Hivites (Joshua 11:3,8 )
Merom, Waters of - irregular low hills stretching from the mountains of Naphtali to snowy, double peaked Mount Hermon, which rises on the N
Manasseh - The eastern part of the tribe of Manasseh prospered much and spread to Mount Hermon, but they finally mixed with the Canaanites, adopted their idolatry, became scattered as Bedouins in the desert, and were the first to be carried away into captivity by the kings of Assyria
Tabor - Moreover, the transfiguration took place near Caesarea Philippi; this fact, and the reference to the "snow," accord best with Mount Hermon being the scene (Mark 8:27; Mark 9:1-3)
Amorite (the) - ... The Amorite name Senir (not Shenir) for Mount Hermon (Deuteronomy 3:9) is mentioned; but this may be the Canaanite term, as distinguished from the Hebrew "Hermon" (lofty peak) and the Phoenician "Sirion" (glittering as a breast-plate; senir too means a breast-plate, from a root, "clatter," the snowy round top glittering like a breast-plate)
Transfiguration, the - Much more likely is Mount Hermon (9,100 feet) to the north of Caesarea Philippi
Arms, Armor - " ( 1 Samuel 17:5 ) This word has furnished one of the names of Mount Hermon
Bashan - ) The tract beyond Jordan (Deuteronomy 3:3; Deuteronomy 3:10; Deuteronomy 3:14; Joshua 12:5; 1 Chronicles 5:23), between Mount Hermon on the N
Arabah - ) The article in Hebrew marks it as some definite spot, namely, the deep sunken gorge extending from Mount Hermon to the Elanitic gulf of the Red Sea; the most extraordinary depression on the earth
Caesarea - The transfiguration probably took place on Mount Hermon
Lebanon - The proper noun literally means the “White” (mountain), probably derived from the snow-capped Mount Hermon, also known as Sirion (Psalm 29:6 )
Transfiguration, the - Though tradition locates the transfiguration on Mount Tabor there is little to confirm this view and modern critics favor Mount Hermon, the highest mountain-top in Gaulanitis, or one of the spurs of the Anti-Lebanus
Tabor, Mount - Apart from this objection, not in itself decisive, all the events immediately associated with it unquestionably took place on or about the southern slope of Mount Hermon (Matthew 16:17-28, Mark 8:27-38, Luke 9:18-37)
Transfiguration - Several geographical locations have been suggested: Mount Hermon (truly "high, " at 9,200 ft
Damascus, Damascenes - The green oasis between Mount Hermon and the desert must always be a theatre of human activity
Mark, Gospel by - After returning through Decapolis, and ( Mark 8 ) feeding the four thousand at Gennesaret, He went to the north-east, and ( Mark 9 ) was transfigured before His three disciples; it was probably on Mount Hermon
Baal - This is usually considered as a distinct place from Mount Hermon; but we know that this mountain had at least three names, Deuteronomy 8:9, and Baal-hermon may have been a fourth in use among the Phœnician worshippers of Baal
Galilee, Sea of - ... Sudden and violent storms agitate the waters, sweeping down the ravines and gorges converging to the head of the lake, from the vast naked plateau of the Jaulan and the Hauran and Mount Hermon in the background
Jordan - But besides these, there is a third and longer stream, which rises beyond the northern limit of Palestine, near Hasbeia on the west side of Mount Hermon, flows twenty-four miles to the south, and unites with the other streams before they enter the "waters of Merom," now lake Huleh, the Jordan flows about nine miles south-ward to the sea of Tiberias, through which its clear and smooth course may be traced twelve miles to the lower end
Gad (1) - to Mount Hermon (1 Chronicles 5:23)
Damascus - Standing 2300 feet above sea level, it lay northeast of Mount Hermon and about 60 miles east of Sidon, the Mediterranean port city
Manasseh (1) - They advanced from Bashan northwards to the base of Mount Hermon (1 Chronicles 5:23)
Judea - Gaulonitis, a narrow strip of land between Batanaea and the shore of the sea of Tiberias, stretching northward to Mount Hermon, and containing Gamala, a strong town near the southern extremity of the sea of Tiberias; Argob, between this sea and Mount Hippos; Julias, supposed to be the same as Chorazin, and by others to be Bethsaida; and Seleuca, a fortified place on the east border of Lacus Samochonitis. Auranitis, or Ituraea, a mountainous and barren tract north of Batantaea, and bounded on the west by a branch of Mount Hermon, contained Bostra, or Bozra, about fifty miles east from the sea of Tiberias, bordering on Arabia Petraea, afterward enlarged by Trajan, and named Trajana Bostra; and Trachonitis, in 33 15' north latitude, between Hermon and Antilibanus, eastward from the sources of Jordan, and containing Baal-gad, Mispah, Paneas, or Caesarea Philippi, and AEnos, nearly twenty-five miles east of Panaeas, and as far south south-west of Damascus. One of them, namely, Scythopolis, already described in the account of Samaria, was situated to the west of Jordan; but the other nine were all to the east of that river, namely, Gadara, or Kedar, a strong place on a hill, the capital of Peraea in the time of Josephus, about sixty stadia east from the sea of Tiberias, and much frequented for its hot baths: Hippos, sometimes called Susitha, thirty stadia northwest of Gadara; Dium, or Dion, of which the situation is unknown, but conjectured by D'Anville to have been about seven leagues eastward from Pella, a considerable town supplied with copious fountains, on the river Jabbok, fourteen miles south-east of Gadara, and celebrated as the place to which the Christians retired, by divine admonition, before the destruction of Jerusalem; Canatha, south-east of Caesarea, and between the Jordan and Mount Hermon; Garasa, afterward Jaras, three leagues north- east from the upper extremity of the sea of Tiberias, and much noted during the crusades; Rabbath-Ammon, the capital of the Ammonites, south-east of Ramoth, and near the source of the Jabbok, on the confines of Arabia, afterward called Philadelphia by Ptolemy Philadelphus, from whom it had received considerable improvements, of which the ruins are still visible; Abila, four leagues east from Gadara, in a fertile tract between the river Hieromax and Mount Gilead; and Capitolais, a town in Batanaea, five or six leagues east north-east of Gadara
Mount Mountain - This was very probably one of the spurs of Mount Hermon, Jebel esh-Sheikh, ‘the mount of the chief
Mount Mountain - This was very probably one of the spurs of Mount Hermon, Jebel esh-Sheikh, ‘the mount of the chief
Palestine - ... For the purposes of this article, Palestine extends to the north ten to fifteen miles beyond the ancient site of Dan and New Testament Caesarea Philippi into the gorges and mountains just south of Mount Hermon. ... The Jordan River has its source in several springs, primarily on the western and southern slopes of Mount Hermon
Sea, the Salt - Midway in the great valley stretching from Mount Hermon to the gulf of Akabah (Genesis 14:3; Numbers 34:3; Numbers 34:12)
Canaan - Around the base of Mount Hermon are the various sources of the Jordan
Jordan - ... Anciently, when forests abounded more than now, Mount Hermon had more snow and rain falling on it, and Jordan was therefore flooded to overflow
Joshua - to Kadesh Barnea and Gaza, then the northern confederated kings under Jabin, at Merom, and the country even unto Baalgad in the valley of Lebanon under Mount Hermon and unto "great Zidon
Canaan - The Arabah, reaching from the foot of Mount Hermon to the gulf of Akabah, is the most remarkable depression on the earth
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - Jordan River A series of springs and tributaries, resulting from the rains and snows on the heights of Mount Hermon (up to 9,100 feet above sea level) at the southern end of the Anti-Lebanon mountains east of the Rift Valley, converge in Lake Huleh to form the headwaters of the Jordan River
Tribes of Israel, the - Manasseh's terrotory east of the Jordan included the regions of Gilead and Bashan and most likely extended from the Jabbok River to near Mount Hermon
Caesarea Philippi - Situated to the north of the Sea of Galilee on a plateau at the southern foothills of Mount Hermon, it lay in the territory that Philip received from his father, Herod the Great
Canaan - ... Maundrell, when travelling near Mount Hermon, says, "We were instructed by experience what the Psalmist means by ‘the dew of Hermon,' Psalms 133:3 ; our tents being as wet with it, as if it had rained all night
Palesti'na - On Mount Hermon, at its northern border there is perpetual snow