Places Study on Rhodes

Places Study on Rhodes

Acts 21: And it came to pass, that after we were gotten from them, and had launched, we came with a straight course unto Coos, and the day following unto Rhodes, and from thence unto Patara:

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Rhodes

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1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Knights of Rhodes
Military order founded by one Gerald (Gerard), probably c.1113,to care for the poor and strangers in the Holy Land; known as Knights of Rhodes, 1309-1522; Knights of Malta since 1530. Infirmaries were established under Raymond of Provence (1120-1160); their military character grew out of the armed escorts provided to pilgrims. The fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta. Grave abuses crept in and the religious vows were frequently ignored. Protestantism caused their suppression in many countries, and from 1805 they were without a grand master, until Leo XIII filled the office, 1879. Admission now rests upon strict conditions. There are four great priories in Bohemia and Italy.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Rhodes
RHODES was one of the most important and successful cities in ancient Greece. It was founded in b.c. 408, at the N.E. corner of the island of the same name, which Isaiah 43 miles long and 20 miles wide at its widest. The situation was admirable, and the people were able to take advantage of it and to build up a splendid position in the world of commerce. It reached the summit of its success in the 2nd cent. b.c., after the settlement with Rome in 189 made it mistress of great part of Caria and Lycia. Rome’s trade interests were seriously interfered with by this powerful rival, and in b.c. 166 Rome declared the Carian and Lycian cities independent, and made Delos a free port. Its conspicuous loyalty to Rome during the first Mithradatic War was rewarded by the recovery of part of its former Carian possessions. It took the side of Cæsar in the civil war, although most of the East supported Pompey, and suffered successive misfortunes, which reduced it to a common provincial town, though it remained a free city in St. Paul’s time, and retained its fine harbours, walls, streets, and stores. St. Paul touched here on his way from Troas to Cæsarea ( Acts 21:1 ), as it was a regular port of call on that route. Rhodes is mentioned in 1Ma 15:23 as one of the free States to which the Romans sent letters in favour of the Jews. Ezekiel 27:15 , according to the LXX [Note: Septuagint.] , reads ‘sons of the Rhodians’: this is an error; the mention of them in Genesis 10:4 (LXX [Note: Septuagint.] ) and 1 Chronicles 1:7 (LXX [Note: Septuagint.] ) is probably correct. The famous Colossus was a statue of the sun-god at the harbour entrance, 105 feet high. It stood only from b.c. 280 to 224.

A. Souter.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Rhodes
A large island of the Aegean sea, mentioned in Paul's third missionary journey to Jerusalem; he passed it apparently without landing (Acts 21:1). The day before he was at Cos, an island on the N.W. From Rhodes he went eastward to Patara in Lycia. The wind was probably, as often in the Levant, blowing from N.W. S.W. of Asia Minor, having Caria to the N. and Lycia to the E. The people were honorable, upright, and prudent; famed for mercantile pursuits. Its temple to the sun, and the colossus, a statue of Apollo, 105 ft. high, executed by Chares of Lindos, a native artist, 288 B.C. were famous. The coins bear on the obverse the head of Apollo as the sun (the proverb said the sun shone every day on Rhodes), on the reverse the rose from which Rhodes takes its name. The capital is at the N.E. of the island. It was the last spot where the Christians of the East held out against the advancing Saracens, and was subsequently noted as the home and fortress of the knights of John.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Rhodes
A rose, an island to the south of the western extremity of Asia Minor, between Coos and Patara, about 46 miles long and 18 miles broad. Here the apostle probably landed on his way from Greece to Syria (Acts 21:1 ), on returning from his third missionary journey.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Rhodes
(rhohdess) Island off the southwest coast of Asia Minor in the Mediterranean Sea associated with the Dodanim (Genesis 10:4 ; Ezekiel 27:15 ). See Acts 21:1 ), Rhodes was only a minor provincial city.



Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Rhodes
(Ρόδος)

When St. Paul, in his voyage from Troas to Caesarea, touched at the island of Rhodes (Acts 21:1), 12 miles from the S. W. corner of Asia Minor, he was in sight, if only for an evening and morning, of a beautiful city which was for centuries the capital of one of the noblest free States of ancient Greece. ‘With regard to harbours, roads, walls, and other buildings, it so far surpasses other cities, that we know of none equal, much less superior to it’ (Strabo, xiv. ii. 5). Highly favoured by Nature-‘the sun shines every day in Rhodes,’ said an ancient proverb (Pliny, Historia Naturalis (Pliny) ii. 62)-it owed still more to the naval enterprise, political wisdom, commercial integrity, and artistic genius of its people. On an amphitheatre of hills it was as carefully planned in 404 b.c.-by Hippodamus of Miletus, who also laid out the Piraeus-as a modern garden-city. Occupying so central a position in the world that geographers reckoned from it their parallels of latitude and longitude, it succeeded in making itself a focus of the traffic of three continents. After the time of Alexander the Great, it was the first naval power in the aegean, and its code of mercantile law was regarded as an ideal for all other States. Its opulence was merited by its humanity. ‘The Rhodians, although their form of government is not democratic, are attentive to the welfare of the people, and endeavour to maintain the multitude of the poor.… There are public officers in the State, the function of whom is to procure and distribute provisions, so that the poor may obtain subsistence, and the city not suffer for want of persons to serve her, especially in manning her fleets’ (Strabo, loc. cit.).

Such a commercial centre naturally attracted a colony of Jews, and about 139 b.c. Rhodes was one of the many free States to which Rome is said to have addressed a letter in favour of that race (1 Maccabees 15:23). Rhodes alternately benefited by the deserved favour and suffered from the unworthy jealousy of the Romans. For assisting them in their war against Antiochus the Great, she received (189 b.c.) a large part of Lycia and Caria, but when she began to be dreaded as a possible rival of Rome itself, she was not only shorn of these possessions, but nearly ruined in her commerce by the raising of her rival Delos into a free port. In the Mithridatic war her services to Rome were again so signal, and she won so much glory by successfully resisting a great siege (88 b.c.), that she recovered some of her lost territory and all her former prestige. Finally, however, for taking Caesar’s part in the Civil War, she was so severely punished by Cassius, who robbed her of whole fleet (43 b.c.), that she never again attained her old prosperity. Vespasian made the island a part of the province of Lycia.

Rhodes was the city of the famous Colossus. Two specimens of her art are the Laocoon and the Toro Farnese. Her coins, with the Sun-god on the one side and the Rose on the other, are among the most beautiful in existence. Rhodes acquired a new fame in the Middle Ages as the home, for two centuries, of the Knights of St. John.

Literature.-J. P. Mahaffy, Greek Life and Thought2, 1896, ch. xv., Alexander’s Empire, 1887, ch. xx.; C. Torr, Rhodes in Ancient Times, 1885; H. van Gelder, Geschichte der alten Rhodier, 1900.

James Strahan.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Rhodes
Same as Rhoda
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Rhodes
an island lying south of the province of Caria, in Lesser Asia, and, among the Asiatic islands, is accounted for dignity next to Cyprus and Lesbos. It is pleasant and healthful, and was anciently celebrated for the skill of its inhabitants in navigation, but most, for its prodigious statue of brass consecrated to the sun, and called the Colossus. This statue was seventy cubits high, and bestrode the mouth of the harbour, so that ships could sail between its legs, and it was accounted one of the seven wonders of the world. St. Paul, on his way to Jerusalem, A.D. 58, went from Miletus to Coos, from Coos to Rhodes, and from thence to Patara, in Lycia, Acts 21:1 .

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Rhodes
Rhodes (rôdz), a rose. A noted island in the Mediterranean, 13 miles from the coast of Asia Minor. Paul visited it on his return from his third missionary journey. Acts 21:1. He might have there seen fragments of the greatest of the Seven Wonders of the world—the famous Colossus of Rhodes. This was made of brass, and was 105 feet high. It stood at the right of the port as vessels entered, and not astride the channel, as so generally represented in pictures. It was erected b.c. 290, and overthrown by an earthquake b.c. 224. The modern city Is a place of considerable trade.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Rhodes
An island and a famous city in the Levant, the ancient name of which was Ophiusa. Its modern name alludes to the great quantity and beauty of the roses that grew there. The island is about forty miles long and fifteen wide; its mountains are well wooded, and its valleys highly fertile. The city of Rhodes, at the northeast extremity of the island, was one of the most celebrated of the Greek cities. It was famous for its brazen Colossus, which was one hundred and five feet high, made by Chares of Lyndus: it stood at the mouth of the harbor of the city, on sixty marble columns, and continued perfect only fifty-six years, being thrown down by an earthquake, under the reign of Ptolemy Euergetes king of Egypt, who began to reign B.C. 244. When Paul went to Jerusalem, A. D. 58, he visited Rhodes, Acts 21:1 . Modern Rhodes is a Turkish walled town of 15,000 inhabitants, and considerable commerce. The air of Rhodes is proverbially pure, and its climate serene.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Rhodes, Knights of
Military order founded by one Gerald (Gerard), probably c.1113,to care for the poor and strangers in the Holy Land; known as Knights of Rhodes, 1309-1522; Knights of Malta since 1530. Infirmaries were established under Raymond of Provence (1120-1160); their military character grew out of the armed escorts provided to pilgrims. The fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta. Grave abuses crept in and the religious vows were frequently ignored. Protestantism caused their suppression in many countries, and from 1805 they were without a grand master, until Leo XIII filled the office, 1879. Admission now rests upon strict conditions. There are four great priories in Bohemia and Italy.

Smith's Bible Dictionary - Rhodes
(rosy ), a celebrated island in the Mediterranean Sea. (It is triangular in form, 60 miles long from north to south, and about 18 wide. It is noted now, as in ancient times, for its delightful climate and the fertility of its soil. The city of Rhodes, its capital, was famous for its huge brazen statue of Apollo called the Colossus of Rhodes. It stood at the entrance of the harbor, and was so large that ships in full sail could pass between its legs. ED.) Rhodes is immediately opposite the high Carian and Lycian headlands at the southwest extremity of the peninsula of Asia Minor. Its position had much to do with its history. Its real eminence began about 400 B.C. with the founding of the city of Rhodes, at the northeast extremity of the island, which still continues to be the capital. After Alexander's death it entered on a glorious period, its material prosperity being largely developed, and its institutions deserving and obtaining general esteem. We have notice of the Jewish residents in Rhodes in 1 Maccabees 15:23 . The Romans, after the defeat of Antiochus, assigned, during some time, to Rhodes certain districts on the mainland. Its Byzantine, history is again eminent. Under Constantine If was the metropolis of the "Province of the Islands," It was the last place where the Christians of the East held out against the advancing Seracens; and subsequently it was once more famous as the home and fortress of the Knights of St. John. (It is now reduced to abject poverty. There are two cities --Rhodes the capital and Lindus --and forty or fifty villages. The population, according to Turner Isaiah 20,000 , of whom 6000 are Turks and the rest Greeks, together with a few Jews.)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Rhodes
An island lying near the S.W. corner of Asia Minor. Acts 21:1 . It was at one time a place of great renown. It still bears the same name.

Sentence search

Rhodes - The city of Rhodes, its capital, was famous for its huge brazen statue of Apollo called the Colossus of Rhodes. ) Rhodes is immediately opposite the high Carian and Lycian headlands at the southwest extremity of the peninsula of Asia Minor. with the founding of the city of Rhodes, at the northeast extremity of the island, which still continues to be the capital. We have notice of the Jewish residents in Rhodes in 1 Maccabees 15:23 . The Romans, after the defeat of Antiochus, assigned, during some time, to Rhodes certain districts on the mainland. There are two cities --Rhodes the capital and Lindus --and forty or fifty villages
Cos - Paul passed the night on this island on his way by sea from Miletus to Rhodes (Acts 21:1). of Rhodes; 25 miles long by 10 miles wide
Patara - shore of Lycia, near the left bank of the Xanthus and opposite Rhodes (Acts 21:1-2). Paul coming from Rhodes at the end of his third missionary journey here found a ship going to Phoenicia, and in it completed his voyage
Coos, Cos - of Rhodes: now called Stanchio
Rhodes - The city of Rhodes, at the northeast extremity of the island, was one of the most celebrated of the Greek cities. 58, he visited Rhodes, Acts 21:1 . Modern Rhodes is a Turkish walled town of 15,000 inhabitants, and considerable commerce. The air of Rhodes is proverbially pure, and its climate serene
Rhodes - From Rhodes he went eastward to Patara in Lycia. The coins bear on the obverse the head of Apollo as the sun (the proverb said the sun shone every day on Rhodes), on the reverse the rose from which Rhodes takes its name
Rhodes - See Acts 21:1 ), Rhodes was only a minor provincial city
Rhodes - Rhodes (rôdz), a rose. He might have there seen fragments of the greatest of the Seven Wonders of the world—the famous Colossus of Rhodes
Rodanim - (rahd uh nihm) Inhabitants of Rhodes (1 Chronicles 1:7 NRSV)
Colossus - The name was especially applied to certain famous statues in antiquity, as the Colossus of Nero in Rome, the Colossus of Apollo at Rhodes
Dodanim - They are associated, by the above passage, and by dim etymological inferences, with the island of Rhodes or some location on the north coast of the Mediterranean
Cni'Dus - (nidus), a city of great consequence, situated at the extreme south west of the peninsula of Asia Minor, on a promontory now called Cape Crio , which projects between the islands of Cos and Rhodes
Malta, Knights of - 1113,to care for the poor and strangers in the Holy Land; known as Knights of Rhodes, 1309-1522; Knights of Malta since 1530. The fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta
Knights of Malta - 1113,to care for the poor and strangers in the Holy Land; known as Knights of Rhodes, 1309-1522; Knights of Malta since 1530. The fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta
Knights of Rhodes - 1113,to care for the poor and strangers in the Holy Land; known as Knights of Rhodes, 1309-1522; Knights of Malta since 1530. The fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta
Hospitallers of Saint John of Jerusalem - 1113,to care for the poor and strangers in the Holy Land; known as Knights of Rhodes, 1309-1522; Knights of Malta since 1530. The fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta
Rhodes, Knights of - 1113,to care for the poor and strangers in the Holy Land; known as Knights of Rhodes, 1309-1522; Knights of Malta since 1530. The fall of Jerusalem, 1187, and Acre, 1291, greatly depleted their possessions and they took refuge in the Island of Rhodes until vanquished by Solyman II, 1522, when they were offered Malta
Rhodes - Paul, in his voyage from Troas to Caesarea, touched at the island of Rhodes (Acts 21:1), 12 miles from the S. Highly favoured by Nature-‘the sun shines every day in Rhodes,’ said an ancient proverb (Pliny, Historia Naturalis (Pliny) ii. Rhodes was one of the many free States to which Rome is said to have addressed a letter in favour of that race (1 Maccabees 15:23). Rhodes alternately benefited by the deserved favour and suffered from the unworthy jealousy of the Romans. ... Rhodes was the city of the famous Colossus. Rhodes acquired a new fame in the Middle Ages as the home, for two centuries, of the Knights of St. Torr, Rhodes in Ancient Times, 1885; H
Cos - (cahss) Island and its chief city between Miletus and Rhodes where Paul landed briefly on his return voyage after his third missionary journey (Acts 21:1 )
Cnidus - A town and peninsula of Doris in Caria, jutting out from the southwest corner of Asia Minor, between the islands of Rhodes and Cos
Coos - (Written Cos in the RSV), a small island, one of the Sporades in the Aegean Sea, in the north-west of Rhodes, off the coast of Caria
Lycia - A wolf, a province in the south-west of Asia Minor, opposite the island of Rhodes
Caria - The more important States, Rhodes, etc
Dodanim - and the Samaritan Version also read Rhodii, whence some have concluded that the Rhodians, the inhabitants of the island of Rhodes, are meant
Pat'Ara - Immediately opposite is the island of Rhodes
Patara - Patara (păt'a-rah), a seaport town on the southwest shore of Lycia, near the left bank of Xanthus, and opposite Rhodes
Adrian vi, Pope - He appealed in vain to Christian rulers to oppose the advancing Turks, and his death was hastened by the fall of Rhodes into their hands
Dedel, Adrian - He appealed in vain to Christian rulers to oppose the advancing Turks, and his death was hastened by the fall of Rhodes into their hands
Lycia - of Asia Minor opposite Rhodes
Dodanim - (Genesis 10:4) DODANIM or RODANIM (1 Chronicles 1:7); since the Hebrew letter Daleth ( ד ) and the Hebrew letter Resh ( ר ), closely resemble One another in Hebrew, Septuagint and Samaritan versions translate "the inhabitants of Rhodes," the large island in the E
Adrian Dedel - He appealed in vain to Christian rulers to oppose the advancing Turks, and his death was hastened by the fall of Rhodes into their hands
Dodanim - ” If Rodanim is correct, the reference may be to inhabitants of Rhodes
Rhodes - 58, went from Miletus to Coos, from Coos to Rhodes, and from thence to Patara, in Lycia, Acts 21:1
Rhodes - Rhodes was one of the most important and successful cities in ancient Greece. Rhodes is mentioned in 1Ma 15:23 as one of the free States to which the Romans sent letters in favour of the Jews
Island - Coos or Cos (Acts 21:1 NIV) is an island 50 miles northwest of Rhodes. Rhodes is an island southwest of Asia Minor (Acts 21:1 )
Lyc'ia - (land of Lycus ) is the name of that southwestern region of the peninsula of Asia Minor which is immediately opposite the island of Rhodes
Lycia - 188, and given to Rhodes at first, but afterwards freed in b
Halicarnassus - John (whose headquarters were in Rhodes), under their Grand Master de Naillac, a
Orders of Knighthood - The greater regular orders were of three classes: ...
purely military, including the Knights Templars, the Orders of Christ, of Montesa, of Aviz, of Calatrava, and of Alcantara

military and hospitaller, such as the Hospitallers of Saint John of Jerusalem (Knights of Malta, or of Rhodes), the Teutonic Order, and the Order of Saint James of Compostela

purely hospitaller, including the Orders of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem, of the Holy Ghost, and of Our Lady of Ransom, called Mercedarians
Of the lesser regular orders, the Knights of Livonia were the most important
Wonder - The seven wonders of the world were the Egyptian pyramids, the Mausoleum erected by Artemisia, the temple of Diana at Ephesus, the walls and hanging gardens of Babylon, the colossus at Rhodes, the statue of Jupiter Olympius, and the Pharos or watch-tower of Alexandria
Javan, - Rhodes); from the reference to Kittim (Kition) as his son, it is possible that the passage refers particularly to Cyprus
Metaphysics - (Greek: meta, after or beyond; physika, physics) ... Historically this word probably originated with Andronicus of Rhodes who arranged the works of Aristotle in two series; the books on physics and those "after the physics
Missions Etrangeres de Paris - A congregation based on the plans of Alexandre de Rhodes as represented to Pope Innocent X in 1650
Chios - ‘When he had sailed by Rhodes and Cos, he touched at Lesbos, as thinking he should have overtaken Agrippa there; but he was taken short here by a north wind, which hindered his ship from going to the shore, so he remained many days at Chios
Society of Foreign Missions of Paris - A congregation based on the plans of Alexandre de Rhodes as represented to Pope Innocent X in 1650
Cnidus - angle of Asia Minor, between the islands of Cos and Rhodes
Cyprus - In sailing from Rhodes and Patara Paul's ship "sighted" Cyprus, leaving it on the left in going to Phoenicia (Acts 21:3)
Apple Tree - As the best apples of Egypt, though ordinary, are brought thither by sea from Rhodes, and by land from Damascus, we may believe that Judea, an intermediate country between Egypt and Damascus, has none that are of any value
Tiberius (2) - 6 he retired to Rhodes, and remained there eight years in solitude, while his young stepsons received advancement in the State
Praedestinatus, an Author - We are thus told of a number of personages whom no one else mentions—Diodorus of Crete who refuted the Secundians, Philo the Alogi, Theodotus of Pergamus the Colorbasians, Crato, a Syrian bishop, who refuted the Theodotians, Tranquillus the Noetians, Euphranon of Rhodes the Severians, and a host of others of whom we should expect to hear elsewhere if they were not imaginary personages
Baal - It is probable that Baal, Belus, or Bel, the great god of the Carthaginians, and also of the Sidonians, Babylonians, and Assyrians, who, from the testimony of Scripture, appears to have been delighted with human sacrifices, was the Moloch of the Ammonites; the Chronus of the Greeks, who was the chief object of adoration in Italy, Crete, Cyprus, and Rhodes, and all other countries where divine honours were paid him; and the Saturn of the Latins
Library - Many of the first librarians were outstanding scholars and literary critics, such as Zenodotus of Ephesus, Apollonius of Rhodes, Callimachus the poet, and Eratosthenes the geographer
Titus (Emperor) - 69) and the arming of Vitellius led Titus to hope that he would succeed his father, and he returned by Asia Minor, Rhodes, and Cyprus to Syria
Herod - After the battle of Actium, his great object was to make terms with the conqueror; and, as a preliminary step, he put to death Hyrcanus, the only surviving male of the Asmodeans; and having secured his family, he embarked for Rhodes, where Augustus at that time was
Herod - After the battle of Actium he gained, by a mixture of humility and boldness at Rhodes, the favor of Octavian the conqueror, who confirmed him in the kingdom, and added several cities along with the province of Trachonitis and district of Paneas. He rebuilt the temple of Apollo at Rhodes, which had been consumed by fire, "the greatest and most illustrious of all his works" according to Josephus
Wine And Strong Drink - A striking and unexpected witness to the extent to which the wines of the West were imported has recently been furnished by the handles of wine jars, especially of amphorœ from Rhodes, which have been found in such numbers in the cities excavated in Southern Palestine (see Bliss and Macalister, op
Tiberius - On receiving it he was sent on an important mission to the East, but retired for some years to Rhodes, whence he did not return to Rome till a
Greece - ... Even in the period of greatest depression Hellas still maintained her old pre-eminence in education, though for a time the universities of Rhodes, Alexandria, and Tarsus rivalled that of Athens
Banquet - It was occasionally performed, however, by females of the highest rank; for the daughter of Cleobulus, one of the Grecian sages, and king of Lindus, a city on the southeast part of Rhodes, was not ashamed to wash the feet of her father's guests
Stoics - The earliest teachers came from Cyprus, Cilicia, Babylon, Palestine, Syria, and Phrygia, and the universities of Tarsus, Rhodes, and Alexandria were its strongholds
Greece, Religion And Society of - During this era the Greeks established trade colonies on the shores of the Black Sea, the region of the Dardanelles, on the eastern shore of the Aegean Sea, the islands of Crete, Rhodes, Cyprus, Sidon and Tyre, Naucratis in the Nile delta, Italy, Sicily, and Spain
Serpent - The same learned writer discovers traces of the serpent worship among the Hyperboreans, at Rhodes, named Ophiusa, in Phrygia, and upon the Hellespont, in the island Cyprus, in Crete, among the Athenians, in the name of Cecrops, among the natives of Thebes in Boeotia, among the Lacedaemonians, in Italy, in Syria, &c, and in the names of many places, as well as the people where the Ophites settled
Vespasian - He postponed his departure till the summer, and travelled by Rhodes and Greece to Corcyra and Calabria
Hellenistic And Biblical Greek - Crete and Rhodes, the gradual subsidence of dialectic forms which is traceable in the inscriptions reflects the changes in the living language
Physician - Of these there were more than 300 at Athens, Cnidos, Cos (the ruins of which have been uncovered within the last few years), Delphi, Pergamos, Rhodes, and Trcezen
Roman Empire - The Romans did not take over Asia at this time, but strengthened the power of the king of Pergamum and that of the State of Rhodes, to keep Antiochus out
Education - At this epoch Athens and Rome had famous schools, but even they had to yield to Rhodes, Alexandria, and Tarsus; and Marseilles, which had been from the very early days of Greek history a centre of Greek influence, was in the time of Strabo more frequented than Athens
Paul - From Miletus he sailed by Cos, Rhodes, and Patara in Lycia, to Tyre, Acts 21
Paul - (Acts 20:18-35 ) The course of the voyage from Miletas was by Coos and Rhodes to Patara, and from Patara in another vessel past Cyprus to Tyre