Places Study on Riblah

Places Study on Riblah

Numbers 34: And the coast shall go down from Shepham to Riblah, on the east side of Ain; and the border shall descend, and shall reach unto the side of the sea of Chinnereth eastward:
2 Kings 23: And Pharaohnechoh put him in bands at Riblah in the land of Hamath, that he might not reign in Jerusalem; and put the land to a tribute of an hundred talents of silver, and a talent of gold.
2 Kings 25: So they took the king, and brought him up to the king of Babylon to Riblah; and they gave judgment upon him.
2 Kings 25: And Nebuzaradan captain of the guard took these, and brought them to the king of Babylon to Riblah:
2 Kings 25: And the king of Babylon smote them, and slew them at Riblah in the land of Hamath. So Judah was carried away out of their land.
Jeremiah 39: But the Chaldeans' army pursued after them, and overtook Zedekiah in the plains of Jericho: and when they had taken him, they brought him up to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon to Riblah in the land of Hamath, where he gave judgment upon him.
Jeremiah 39: Then the king of Babylon slew the sons of Zedekiah in Riblah before his eyes: also the king of Babylon slew all the nobles of Judah.
Jeremiah 52: Then they took the king, and carried him up unto the king of Babylon to Riblah in the land of Hamath; where he gave judgment upon him.
Jeremiah 52: And the king of Babylon slew the sons of Zedekiah before his eyes: he slew also all the princes of Judah in Riblah.
Jeremiah 52: So Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard took them, and brought them to the king of Babylon to Riblah.
Jeremiah 52: And the king of Babylon smote them, and put them to death in Riblah in the land of Hamath. Thus Judah was carried away captive out of his own land.

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Riblah

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Riblah
Riblah (rĭb'lah), fertility. An ancient city in the northeastern frontier of Canaan. Numbers 34:10-11. The ancient town was upon the great road from Palestine to Babylon, and was a convenient military headquarters for the Babylonian kings and others invading the country. Here the Egyptian king Pharaoh-nechoh put Jehoahaz in chains and made Eliakim king, and here Nebuchadnezzar brought Zedekiah, murdered his sons before his eyes, and then put out his eyes and bound him in chains to be carried to Babylon. 2 Kings 23:29-35; 2 Kings 25:1-7; Jeremiah 39:5-7. Riblah is now a mean and poor village.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Riblah
RIBLAH . 1 . An important town (mod. Ribleh ) and military station on the eastern bank of the Orontes, 50 miles S. of Hamath. It is mentioned in the Bible only in the literature of the Chaldæan period, and was apparently the headquarters of Nebuchadrezzar the Great for his South-Syrian and Palestinian dominions. From this position the Phœnician cities of the coast were within easy command, as also were Cœle-Syria and the kingdom of Damascus, along with the land-routes leading farther south. Here judgment was pronounced upon Zedekiah and his officers ( 2Ki 25:6 ; 2 Kings 25:20-21 , Jeremiah 39:5 f., Jeremiah 52:9 ff.).

The statement of 2 Kings 23:33 , that Pharaoh-necho put Jehoahaz in bonds at Riblah in the land of Hamath, is to be corrected by the parallel passage 2 Chronicles 36:3 , where the transaction is said to have taken place in Jerusalem itself. The true reading is, ‘and Pharaoh-necho removed him from reigning in Jerusalem’ (cf. also the LXX [Note: Septuagint.] ). It was the later action of Nebuchadrezzar with regard to Zedekiah, above referred to, that suggested the change in the text. The phrase ‘in the land of Hamath’ ( 2 Kings 25:21 ) is to be compared with the ‘nineteen districts of Hamath’ enumerated in the Annals of Tiglath-pileser iii.

Riblah should be read for Diblah in Ezekiel 6:14 . See No. 2 .

2 . Riblah (with the article) is, it the reading is correct, mentioned as one of the eastern boundary marks of Israel in Numbers 34:11 . The place intended was not far N.E. of the Sea of Galilee, but the exact site is unknown.

It was, of course, not the Riblah on the Orontes. It is remarkable, however, that this Riblah is mentioned in connexion with the ‘approach to Hamath’ (v. 8). which, as Winckler has shown, was on the S.W. of Mt. Hermon, and the centre of the kingdom of Hamath of the time of David. Cf. Ezekiel 6:14 as above corrected.

J. F. McCurdy.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Riblah
Fruitful, an ancient town on the northern frontier of Palestine, 35 miles north-east of Baalbec, and 10 or 12 south of Lake Homs, on the eastern bank of the Orontes, in a wide and fertile plain. Here Nebuchadnezzar had his head-quarters in his campaign against Jerusalem, and here also Necho fixed his camp after he had routed Josiah's army at Megiddo (2 Kings 23:29-35 ; 25:6,20,21 ; Jeremiah 39:5 ; 52:10 ). It was on the great caravan road from Palestine to Carchemish, on the Euphrates. It is described (Numbers 34:11 ) as "on the eastern side of Ain." A place still called el Ain, i.e., "the fountain", is found in such a position about 10 miles distant. (See JERUSALEM .)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Riblah
(rihb' lah) 1. Syrian town located near Kadesh on the Orontes near the border with Babylonia. There Pharaoh Neco imprisoned King Jehoahaz of Judah after the young monarch had reigned only three months (2 Kings 23:31-33 ). Later, when Zedekiah rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon, he was taken to Riblah as a prisoner and viewed the execution of his sons before having his eyes put out (2 Kings 25:4-7 ). See Numbers 34:11 ). Earliest translations read Arbelah.



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Riblah
1. A landmark on the eastern border of Israel (Numbers 34:11), between Shepham and the sea of Cinneroth, on the "E. side of the spring." Probably, without the vowel points and the final -ah of motion towards, the true name is Ηarbel "the Mount of Bel" or "Baal". Judges 3:3, "Ηar-Βaal-Ηermon ", Septuagint reads Αr-bela , which confirms Harbel; the summit of Hermon, the southernmost and highest peak of Antilibanus, 10,000 ft. high, overtopping every mountain in Palestine.

The ruins of a Baal sanctuary still remain on it. However, "go down from Shepham to Riblah" seemingly implies Riblah was lower; therefore Riblah was probably one of the many sanctuaries with which the sides, as well as the summit, of Hermon were covered. The landmark of Judges 3:3 would be unlikely to he omitted in Numbers 34:11. The "spring" or "fountain" (Αin ), E. of which was Riblah, was probably, as Jerome and the later targums understood it, the fountain of the Jordan. The two most celebrated sources of Jordan, Daphne and Paneas, are in the plain at the S.W. foot of Hermon; streams from the western slopes of the mountain feed the longest branch of the river.

2. Riblah or Riblathah in the land of Hamath, on the high road between Palestine and Babylon, where the Babylonian kings remained in directing the operations of their armies in Palestine and Phoenicia; where Jehoahaz was put in chains by Pharaoh Necho (2 Kings 23:33), and Zedekiah, after seeing his sons slain, had his own eyes put out (Jeremiah 39:5-7; literally, Jeremiah 39:9-10), and other leading captives were slain, probably by the Assyrian death of impaling (Jeremiah 39:24; Jeremiah 39:27), as depicted on the monuments.

Still called Ribleh, on the right bank of the Orontes (Asy), 30 miles N.E. of Baalbek; consisting of 40 or 50 houses and the remains of a quadrangular building. In the midst of a vast and fertile plain, stretching in all directions save S.W., and on a mountain stream; an admirable encampment for the Egyptian and Babylonian hosts. The curious Κamoa el Ηermel is visible from Riblah, a pyramidal top resting on a quadrilateral building in two stories. It is on a high mound several miles higher up the Orontes than Riblah. The lower story has figures of dogs, stags, and hunting instruments. From Riblah the roads were open by the Euphrates to Nineveh, or by Palmyra to Babylon, by the S. of Lebanon and the coast to Palestine and Egypt, or through the Bekaa and Jordan valley to the center of Palestine.

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Riblah
A city of Syria where judgment was given on Zedekiah, and where his eyes were put out. (2 Kings 25:6; Jeremiah 52:9) If from Rub, it means quarrel.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Riblah
Quarrel; greatness to him
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Riblah
A city of Syria, in the country of Hamath, at the north-east extremity of Canaan, Numbers 34:11 . Its site is probably found in the modern village Ribleh, on the river Orontes, at the northern end of the great valley of Lebanon, El-Bukaa.. Through this valley, by way of Hamath and Riblah, was the readiest access to Palestine from the north. At Riblah king Jehoahaz was taken and deposed by Pharaoh- necho; here also Nebuchadnezzar established his headquarters when warring against Judah, 2 Kings 23:33 ; 25:6,20,21 ; Jeremiah 39:5 ; 52:10 .

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Riblah
1. Place apparently on the eastern boundary of Palestine. Numbers 34:11 . Not identified.

2. City in the land of Hamath, where Pharaoh-nechoh imprisoned Jehoahaz, and whence the king of Babylon carried Zedekiah, when he slew his sons and the priests and chief men of Judah. 2 Kings 23:33 ; 2 Kings 25:6,7,20,21 ; Jeremiah 39:5,6 ; Jeremiah 52:9,10,26,27 . Identified with Ribleh, 34 28' N, 36 31' E .

Sentence search

Harbel - (hahr' behl) TEV reading of place name in Numbers 34:11 , usually translated Riblah but spelled in Hebrew with beginning “h,” which can be the Hebrew definite article. See Riblah
Shepham - A treeless place, Numbers 34:10,11 : "The coast shall go down from Shepham to Riblah
Rib-Lah - ( Numbers 34:11 ) It seems hardly possible, without entirely disarranging the specification or the boundary, that the Riblah in question can be the same with the following.
Riblah in the land of Hamath, a place on the great road between Palestine and Babylonia, at which the kings of Babylonia were accustomed to remain while directing the operations of their armies in Palestine and Phoenicia. (Jeremiah 39:5,6 ; 62:9,10,26,27 ; 2 Kings 25:6,20,21 ) In like manner Pharaoh-necho after his victory over the Babylonians at Carchemish, returned to Riblah and summoned Jehoahaz from Jerusalem before him. (2 Kings 23:33 ) This Riblah still retains its ancient name, on the right (east) bank of the el-Asy (Orontes) upon the great road which connects Baalbek and Hums , about 36 miles northeast of the former end 20 miles southwest of the latter place
Dib'Lath - (accurately DIBLAH), a place named only in (Ezekiel 6:14 ) Probably only another form of Riblah
Ain - Riblah, E. Riblah is identified as on the N. side of the Hermon mountains; and Ain answers to Ain el 'Azy (nine miles from Riblah, on the N
Riblah - However, "go down from Shepham to Riblah" seemingly implies Riblah was lower; therefore Riblah was probably one of the many sanctuaries with which the sides, as well as the summit, of Hermon were covered. of which was Riblah, was probably, as Jerome and the later targums understood it, the fountain of the Jordan. Riblah or Riblathah in the land of Hamath, on the high road between Palestine and Babylon, where the Babylonian kings remained in directing the operations of their armies in Palestine and Phoenicia; where Jehoahaz was put in chains by Pharaoh Necho (2 Kings 23:33), and Zedekiah, after seeing his sons slain, had his own eyes put out (Jeremiah 39:5-7; literally, Jeremiah 39:9-10), and other leading captives were slain, probably by the Assyrian death of impaling (Jeremiah 39:24; Jeremiah 39:27), as depicted on the monuments. The curious Κamoa el Ηermel is visible from Riblah, a pyramidal top resting on a quadrilateral building in two stories. It is on a high mound several miles higher up the Orontes than Riblah. From Riblah the roads were open by the Euphrates to Nineveh, or by Palmyra to Babylon, by the S
Diblah - correct) reading is Riblah (wh
Riblah - Riblah . ... The statement of 2 Kings 23:33 , that Pharaoh-necho put Jehoahaz in bonds at Riblah in the land of Hamath, is to be corrected by the parallel passage 2 Chronicles 36:3 , where the transaction is said to have taken place in Jerusalem itself. ... Riblah should be read for Diblah in Ezekiel 6:14 . Riblah (with the article) is, it the reading is correct, mentioned as one of the eastern boundary marks of Israel in Numbers 34:11 . ... It was, of course, not the Riblah on the Orontes. It is remarkable, however, that this Riblah is mentioned in connexion with the ‘approach to Hamath’ (v
Riblah - Through this valley, by way of Hamath and Riblah, was the readiest access to Palestine from the north. At Riblah king Jehoahaz was taken and deposed by Pharaoh- necho; here also Nebuchadnezzar established his headquarters when warring against Judah, 2 Kings 23:33 ; 25:6,20,21 ; Jeremiah 39:5 ; 52:10
Shepham - On the eastern boundary of the promised land, between Hatser-enan where the northern boundary ends and Riblah (or Marbel, i
Riblah - Riblah (rĭb'lah), fertility. Riblah is now a mean and poor village
Diblah - With slight manuscript support from the Latin Vulgate, many Bible students read “Riblah” supposing that in the earliest history of the text tradition a copyist made the simple mistake of changing a Hebrew “r” to a Hebrew “d,” the two letters being easily confused. See Riblah
Nebuzar-Adan - He managed the siege of Jerusalem, and made himself master of the city, while his sovereign was at Riblah in Syria, 2 Kings 25; Jeremiah 39; Jeremiah 40; Jeremiah 52
Diblath - Place in the north of Canaan, conjectured by some to be the same as Riblah, but only by supposing an error of the copyist, D (ד) being written for R (ר)
Zephaniah - Son of Maaseiah and 'second' priest in the reign of Zedekiah; he was carried captive to Nebuchadnezzar and slain at Riblah
Riblah - Later, when Zedekiah rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon, he was taken to Riblah as a prisoner and viewed the execution of his sons before having his eyes put out (2 Kings 25:4-7 )
Ain - A town in the neighbourhood of Riblah ( Numbers 34:11 ), probably the modern el-’Ain near the source of the Orontes
Jehoz'Adak - ( 1 Chronicles 6:14,15 ) When his father was slain at Riblah by order of Nebuchadnezzar, (2 Kings 25:18,21 ) Jehozadak was led away captive to Babylon
Zephaniah - On the occasion of the final overthrow of Jerusalem he was put to death at Riblah ( Jeremiah 52:24 ff
Ain - It is now known as Ain el-Azy, a remarkable spring, one of the sources of the Orontes, and about ten miles west of Riblah
Zedekiah - Zedekiah was taken to Riblah along with his family. At Riblah he witnessed the executions of his sons before his own eyes were blinded (2 Kings 25:7 )
Orontes - Cities of the Orontes valley include Antioch (Acts 11:19 ; Acts 13:1 ), Hamath (2 Samuel 8:9 ; 2 Kings 17:24 ; 2 Chronicles 8:4 ; Isaiah 11:11 ), Qarqar, where King Ahab of Israel joined a coalition of Syrian kings warring against Shalmaneser III, and Riblah (2 Kings 23:33 ; 2Kings 25:6,2 Kings 25:21 )
Ain - of the ancient Riblah
Nebuzar-a'Dan - ( Jeremiah 39:11 ) He seems to have quitted Judea when he took down the chief people of Jerusalem to his master at Riblah
Jehoahaz - King Necho, at his return from the expedition against Carchemish, provoked at the people of Judah for having placed this prince upon the throne without his consent, sent for him to Riblah, in Syria, divested him of the kingdom, loaded him with chains, and sent him into Egypt, where he died, Jeremiah 22:11-12
Necho - 610, he halted in Riblah in Syria, and sending for Jehoahaz, king of the Jews, he deposed him, loaded him with chains, and sent him into Egypt
Zephaniah - He was among the captives slain by the king of Babylon at Riblah, 2 Kings 25:18-21 Jeremiah 21:1 29:25,29 37:3 52:24-27
Nebuzaradan - ) Took the chief Jews for judgment to Nebuchadnezzar at Riblah
Jeho'Ahaz - Pharaoh-necho sent to Jerusalem to depose him and to fetch him to Riblah
Zephani'ah - (Jeremiah 29:29 ) On the capture of Jerusalem he was taken and slain at Riblah
Seraiah - He was put to death, with other distinguished captives, by order of Nebuchadnezzar at Riblah, 2 Kings 25:18 ; 2 Kings 25:21 , Jeremiah 52:24 ; Jeremiah 52:27
Seraiah - When Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar he was carried to Riblah, and there put to death
Zephaniah - He, along with some other captive Jews, was put to death by the king of Babylon "at Riblah in the land of Hamath" (2 Kings 25:21 )
Zedekiah - Zedekiah was seized and carried to Nebuchadnezzar, then at Riblah, in Syria, who reproached him with his perfidy, caused all his children to be slain before his face and his own eyes to be put out, and then, loading him with chains of brass, ordered him to be sent to Babylon
Shallum - Necho, at that time at Riblah, sent an army against Jerusalem, which at once yielded, and Jehoahaz was carried captive to the Egyptian camp, Eliakim being appointed king in his stead
Hamath - ... The kingdom of Hamath comprehended the great plain lying on both banks of the Orontes from the fountain near Riblah to Assamea on the north, and from Lebanon on the west to the desert on the east
Seraiah - The high priest under king Zedekiah; taken by Nebuzaradan, captain of the Babylonian guard, and slain at Riblah (2 Kings 25:18; 1 Chronicles 6:14; Jeremiah 52:24)
Necho or Pharaoh-Necho - 610, he halted at Riblah in Syria; and sending for Jehoahaz, king of the Jews, he deposed him, loaded him with chains, and sent him into Egypt
Zedekiah - Zedekiah and his followers, attempting to escape, were made captive and taken to Riblah
Zedekiah - Zedekiah was taken and carried to Nebuchadnezzar, then at Riblah, in Syria, who reproached him with his perfidy, caused his children to be slain before his face and his own eyes to be put out; and then loading him with chains of brass, he ordered him to be sent to Babylon, 2 Kings 25:1-30 Jeremiah 39:1-18 52:1-34 Ezekiel 19:1-14
Zedekiah - And thus it came to pass: on being carried before Nebuchadnezzar at Riblah, his sons were slain before his face, then his eyes were put out, and he was carried to Babylon
Jehoahaz - Meditating revenge for his father's death at Megiddo (2 Kings 23:29-30), Jehoahaz was carried captive from "Riblah" in Hamath to Egypt by Pharaoh Necho; "they brought him with chains (or hooks or rings, fastened in wild beasts' noses, appropriate figure as he was compared to a 'lion'; the Assyrian king literally put a hook through the nose of captives, as appears in the Ninevite remains) unto . ... Doubtless Pharaoh, having there dethroned him, took him thence to "Riblah
People of the Land - 2 Kings 25:18-21 records that Nebuchadrezzar put to death at Riblah “sixty men of the people of the land,” along with others held responsible for the revolt against Babylon resulting in the fall of Jersualem in 587 B
Zedekiah - He was seized and carried to Nebuchadnezzar, then at Riblah, a city of Syria
Leb'Anon, - --The main chain of Anti-Libanus commences in the plateau of Bashan, near the parallel of Caesarea Philippi, runs north to Hermon, and then northeast in a straight line till it stinks down into the great plain of Emesa, not far from the site of Riblah
Zedeki'ah - The king's party were overtaken near Jericho and carried to Nebuchadnezzar, who was then at Riblah, at the upper end of the valley of Lebanon
Nebuchadnezzar - 588, the city was taken and Zedekiah, being seized, was brought to Nebuchadnezzar, who was then at Riblah in Syria
Zedekiah - He was taken for judgment to Riblah at the upper end of Lebanon; there Nebuchadnezzar first killed his sons before his eyes, then caused the eyes of Zedekiah to be "dug out" (Jeremiah 39; Jeremiah 52:4-11)
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - Zedekiah attempted to escape, but was taken and brought to Nebuchadnezzar, who was then at Riblah in Syria
Land (of Israel) - ... The eastern border is marked out from Hazan Enan to Shepham, and then goes down from Shapham to Riblah on the east side of Ain; it goes down and reaches to the eastern side of the Sea of Chinnereth; the border goes down along the Jordan, and ends at the Salt Sea (Numbers 34:10-12 ; Deuteronomy 3:17 )
Wilderness (2) - They are found even near towns; thus the OT mentions the wildernesses of Gibeon, of Tekoa, of Damascus, of Riblah (Massoretic Text Diblah, Ezekiel 6:14)
Nebuchadnezzar - Zedekiah's eyes were put out after he had seen his sons slain first at Riblah, where Nebuchadnezzar "gave judgment upon him," and was kept a prisoner in Babylon the rest of his life
Jerusalem - 588, the garrison, with the king, endeavoured to make their escape from the city, but were pursued and defeated by the Chaldeans in the plains of Jericho; Zedekiah taken prisoner; his sons killed before his face at Riblah, whither he was taken to the king of Babylon; and he himself, after his eyes were put out, was bound with fetters of brass, and carried prisoner to Babylon, where he died: thus fulfilling the prophecy of Ezekiel, which declared that he should be carried to Babylon, but should not see the place, though he should die there, Ezekiel 12:13