Places Study on Tiberias

Places Study on Tiberias

John 6: After these things Jesus went over the sea of Galilee, which is the sea of Tiberias.
John 6: (Howbeit there came other boats from Tiberias nigh unto the place where they did eat bread, after that the Lord had given thanks:)
John 21: After these things Jesus shewed himself again to the disciples at the sea of Tiberias; and on this wise shewed he himself.

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Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Tiberias
TIBERIAS . A town built by Herod (a.d. 16 22) on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee (called the ‘Sea of Tiberias’ in John 6:1 ; John 21:1 , and in modern Arabic), and named in honour of the Roman Emperor. That it was erected over the site of an ancient graveyard (Jos. [Note: Josephus.] Ant. XVIII. ii. 3) in itself proves that no city had previously existed here. This circumstance made it an unclean place to the Jews, and Herod was obliged to use force in order to people it with any but the lowest of the nation. It was designed entirely on Greek models, and the fact that it was in spirit and civilization entirely foreign is perhaps the reason why it is hardly alluded to in the Gospels the sole reference being John 6:23 . There is no evidence that it was ever visited by Christ. The city surrendered to Vespasian and by him was restored to Agrippa. After the fall of Jerusalem many of the Jews took up their abode in Tiberias, and by a strange reversal of fate this unclean city became a most important centre of Rabbinic teaching. Here lived Judah the Holy, editor of the Mishna. Here the ‘Jerusalem Talmud’ was compiled. In the neighbourhood are the tombs of ‘Aqiba and of Maimonides.

Constantine built a church and established a bishopric at Tiberias, but Christianity never flourished there. The Arabs seized it in a.d. 637; the Crusaders lost it to Saladin in 1187. The city was almost destroyed by a great earthquake in 1837. The principal objects of interest are the ruins of a large castle (possibly Herodian), a very ancient synagogue, and half an hour’s journey to the south the hot springs of Emmaus (the Hammath of Joshua 19:35 ), mentioned by Josephus and Pliny. The city is dirty, and proverbial for its vermin. There is a population of about 4000, more than half of whom are Jews, principally refugees from Poland. There is here an important mission of the United Free Church of Scotland.

For the ‘ Sea of Tiberias ,’ see Galilee [Sea of].

R. A. S. Macalister.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Tiberias
A city, the modern Tubarich, on the western shore of the Sea of Tiberias. It is said to have been founded by Herod Antipas (A.D. 16), on the site of the ruins of an older city called Rakkath, and to have been thus named by him after the Emperor Tiberius. It is mentioned only three times in the history of our Lord (John 6:1,23 ; 21:1 ). In 1837 about one-half of the inhabitants perished by an earthquake. The population of the city is now about six thousand, nearly the one-half being Jews. "We do not read that our Lord ever entered this city. The reason of this is probably to be found in the fact that it was practically a heathen city, though standing upon Jewish soil. Herod, its founder, had brought together the arts of Greece, the idolatry of Rome, and the gross lewdness of Asia. There were in it a theatre for the performance of comedies, a forum, a stadium, a palace roofed with gold in imitation of those in Italy, statues of the Roman gods, and busts of the deified emperors. He who was not sent but to the lost sheep of the house of Israel might well hold himself aloof from such scenes as these" (Manning's Those Holy Fields).

After the fall of Jerusalem (A.D. 70), Tiberias became one of the chief residences of the Jews in Palestine. It was for more than three hundred years their metropolis. From about A.D. 150 the Sanhedrin settled here, and established rabbinical schools, which rose to great celebrity. Here the Jerusalem (or Palestinian) Talmud was compiled about the beginning of the fifth century. To this same rabbinical school also we are indebted for the Masora, a "body of traditions which transmitted the readings of the Hebrew text of the Old Testament, and preserved, by means of the vowel-system, the pronunciation of the Hebrew." In its original form, and in all manuscripts, the Hebrew is written without vowels; hence, when it ceased to be a spoken language, the importance of knowing what vowels to insert between the consonants. This is supplied by the Masora, and hence these vowels are called the "Masoretic vowel-points."



Easton's Bible Dictionary - Tiberias, Sea of
Called also the Sea of Galilee (q.v.) and of Gennesaret. In the Old Testament it is called the Sea of Chinnereth or Chinneroth. (John 21:1 ) is the only evangelist who so designates this lake. His doing so incidentally confirms the opinion that he wrote after the other evangelists, and at a period subsequent to the taking of Jerusalem (A.D. 70). Tiberias had by this time become an important city, having been spared by the Romans, and made the capital of the province when Jerusalem was destroyed. It thus naturally gave its name to the lake.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Tiberias
City on the west of the Sea of Galilee: it was founded by Herod Antipas, and named after the emperor Tiberius. It became the capital of the province of Galilee, and in it were gathered the arts of Greece and the idolatry of Rome. Josephus states (Ant. xviii. 2,3) that to build Tiberias many tombs had to be taken away, which made it ceremonially an unclean place, so that no Jews would live there except those who were compelled, and others who were bribed by the founder. In later days, however, along with Jerusalem, Hebron, and Safed, Tiberias was classed by the Jews as one of their four holy cities, renowned as seats of learning. We do not read of the Lord visiting the city. John 6:23 . It is situate 32 47' N, 35 32' E .

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Tiberias
The town of Tiberias was on the western shore of Lake Galilee (also called the Sea of Galilee and the Sea of Tiberias) (John 6:1; John 6:23). Whereas towns on the northern shore were largely Jewish and were the scene of much of Jesus’ ministry, Tiberias was almost entirely Gentile. The Bible does not record that Jesus ever visited the town. (For map and other details see PALESTINE.)

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Tiberias
TIBERIAS (Τιβεριάς).—A city situated on the W. shore of the Sea of Galilee, founded by Herod Antipas, and named by him in honour of the Emperor Tiberius. The original inhabitants were foreigners, whom Herod either forced to reside in the new city or to whom he gave special inducements if they would. Our Lord, so far as is known, never visited Tiberias, it being His custom to avoid Gentile cities. The only reference to the city in the NT is John 6:23, in which it is stated that ‘there came boats from Tiberias unto the place where they ate the bread after the Lord had given thanks’ (cf. John 6:1; John 21:1).

1. Location.—The ancient city was situated directly on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, and therefore approximately 682 feet below the level of the Mediterranean, at the north end of a narrow rectangular plain about two miles long, which was bounded by a rather steep ridge of hills rising abruptly to the west. From the ruins still to be found in the vicinity it is probable that the ancient city extended considerably farther south of the modern town. Josephus (Ant. xviii. ii. 3; cf. BJ iv. i. 3) says that there were ‘warm baths a little distance from it in a village called Emmaus’ (Hammath?). According to the Talmud (Jerus. [Note: Jerusalem.] Megilla, i. 1), the city was built upon the ancient site of Rakkath of Naphtali; and it is further stated (Sanhed. 12a) that in the 4th cent. the Jews had actually dropped the name Tiberias and reverted to the ancient name Rakkath. On the other hand, in the Bab. [Note: Babylonian.] Talmud, Tiberias is sometimes identified with Rakkath, sometimes with Hammath, and sometimes with Chinnereth (cf. Joshua 19:35). Jerome (Onom. 112. 28 ff.) identifies it with Chinnereth.

2. History.—Herod Antipas is supposed to have completed the building of Tiberias about a.d. 22. Ancient sepulchres were removed to make room for the new foundations, and accordingly the Jews regarded the new city as legally unclean (cf. Numbers 19:11 ff.). Nevertheless the town grew with great rapidity, and, before the downfall of Jerusalem had become one of the chief cities of Palestine. Herod had made it the capital of Galilee, removing the seat of government from Sepphoris, the former capital. The city was fortified by Josephus when commander-in-chief of Galilee (c. [Note: circa, about.] a.d. 66). During the struggle of the Jews with Rome, its inhabitants remained loyal to the national cause. When, however, Vespasian appeared before its walls with three legions, the citizens yielded without resistance. Vespasian restored it to Herod Agrippa II., who stripped it of its political prestige by transferring the capital again to Sepphoris. When Agrippa died (a.d. 100), it fell directly under Roman rule. Shortly after the destruction of Jerusalem (a.d. 70), Tiberias became the chief seat of the Jews and of Jewish learning. According to Epiphanius, it was not long before the city was inhabited exclusively by Jews. In the 2nd cent. the Sanhedrin, which had been shifted from Jerusalem to Jamnia and then to Sepphoris, was established at Tiberias under the presidency of the celebrated Rabbi Judah the Holy.

3. Present condition.—The modern town is called by the Arabs Tâbarîyeh. Traces still remain of the ancient city along the Lake, especially to the south of the present town. Heaps of stones, columns of grey granite, foundations of buildings, and of a thick wall which extended almost to the famous baths, all confirm the supposition that the ancient city extended at one time farther south. The present town is defended on the land side by a wall furnished with towers. There are the ruins of a once imposing castle at the N.W. corner. But castle, walls, and houses were seriously damaged by the earthquakes of 30th Oct. 1759 and of 1st Jan. 1837. Among the famous tombs of Tiberias are those of Maimonides, and Rabbis ‘Akiba and Jochanan. To-day Tiberias has a population of approximately 4000 souls, of whom about two-thirds are Jews and the other third Mohammedans and Christians of different sects. The Protestants have a well-equipped hospital, and are doing a good religious work under the United Free Church of Scotland. The Jews occupy a squalid quarter in the middle of the town, adjacent to the Lake. The city as a whole is ‘a picture of disgusting filth and frightful wretchedness.’ Of late, however, the place is improving somewhat, having become the seat of a Turkish kaimakan, or governor.

Tiberias is hot and fever-haunted. The breezes from the Mediterranean are prevented from striking the city by the hills which bound the plain on the west. The winters are mild, snow being very rarely known. The Lake furnishes the only supply of water. The view from the city embraces the whole extent of the Sea of Galilee except the S.W. extremity. Schürer speaks of Tiberias as ‘the most beautiful spot in Galilee,’ which, however, is an exaggeration. At present it is one of the four sacred cities of the Jews in Palestine, the others being Jerusalem, Hebron, and Safed. The study of the Talmud still flourishes in Tiberias.

Literature.—Robinson, BRP [Note: RP Biblical Researches in Palestine.] iii. 254 ff.; Baedeker-Socin, Pal. [Note: Palestine, Palestinian.] 286 ff.; Guérin, Galilée, i. 250 ff.; Neubauer, Géog. du Talm. [Note: Talmud.] 208 ff.; Merrill, art. ‘Tiberias’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible : Buhl, GAP [Note: AP Geographic des alten Palästina.] 226 f.; Reland, Pal. [Note: Palestine, Palestinian.] ii. 1036; G. A. Smith, HGHL [Note: GHL Historical Geog. of Holy Land.] 447 ff.; Burckhardt, Travels, 320 ff.; Murray, Syria-Pal. [Note: Palestine, Palestinian.] 251; Schürer, HJP [Note: JP History of the Jewish People.] II. i. 143 ff.; Wilson, Lands of the Bible, ii. 116 ff.; Ritter, Geog. of Pal. [Note: Palestine, Palestinian.] ii. 256 ff.; art. ‘Tiberias’ in EBi [Note: Bi Encyclopaedia Biblica.] iv.

George L. Robinson.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Tiberias
John 6:1-23; John 21:1. Josephus (Ant. 18, B.J. 2:9, section 1) says it was built by Herod Antipas, and named in honour of the emperor Tiberius. Capital of Galilee until the time of Herod Agrippa II, who transferred the seat of power again to Sepphoris. Antipas built in Tiberias a Roman stadium and palace adorned with images of animals which offended the Jews, as did also its site on an ancient burial ground. Now Tubarieh, a filthy wretched place. On the western shore toward the southern end of the sea of Galilee or Tiberias, as John alone calls the sea. John is the only New Testament writer who mentions Tiberias. His notice of its many "boats" (John 6:23) agrees with Josephus' account of its traffic. Tiberias stood on the strip of land, two miles long and a quarter of a mile broad, between the water and the steep hills which elsewhere come down to the water's edge. It occupied all the ground of the parallelogram, including Tubarieh at the northern end, and reaching toward the warm baths at the southern end (reckoned by Roman naturalists as one of the wonders of the world: Pliny, H. N. 5:15).

A few palms still are to be seen, but the oleander abounds. The people, numbering 3,000 or 4,000, mostly live by fishing as of old. A strong wall guards the land side, but it is open toward the sea. The Jews, constituting one-fourth of the population, have their quarter in the middle of the town near the lake. Our Lord avoided Tiberias on account of the cunning and unscrupulous character of Herod Antipas whose headquarters were there (Luke 13:32); Herod never saw Him until just before the crucifixion (Luke 23:8). Christ chose the plain of Gennesaret at the head of the lake, where the population was at once dense and Jewish; and, as being sent to the lost sheep of the house of Israel, kept away from Tiberias. After Jerusalem's overthrow Tiberias was spared by the Romans because the people favored rather than opposed the conquerors' arms.

The Sanhedrin, after temporarily sojourning at Jamnia and Sepphoris, fixed its seat there in the second century. The Mishna was compiled in Tiberias by Rabbi Judah Haqodesh, A.D. 190. The Masorah body of traditions, which transmitted the Old Testament text readings and preserved the Hebrew pronunciation and interpretation, originated there. Jerusalem, Hebron, Safed, and Tiberias are the four holy places in which the Jews say if prayer without ceasing were not offered the world would fall into chaos. The Romans recognized the patriarch of Tiberias and empowered him to appoint his subordinate ministers who should visit all the distant colonies of Jews, and to receive contributions from the Jews of the whole Roman empire.

The colony round Tiberias flourished under the emperors Antoninus Plus, Alexander Severus, and Julian, in the second and third centuries. The patriarchate of Tiberias finally ceased in 414 A.D. (See SYNAGOGUE on the Roman character of the existing remains of synagogues in Palestine, due no doubt to the patronage of Antoninus Pius and Alexander Severus, the great builders and restorers of temples in Syria.) The eminent Maimonides laboured and was buried at Tiberias in 1204 A.D. The earthquake of 1837 shook the town mightily. A Jewish idea is that Messiah will emerge from the lake, proceed to Tiberias and Safed, then set His throne on the highest peak in Galilee.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Tiberias, Sea of
John's (John 6:1; John 21:1) designation as better understood by the Gentile Romans, etc., whom he addressed. (See GALILEE, SEA or, the local designation.) Lieut. Kitchener makes the depth 682.554 ft. The neighbouring Kurn Hattin is an extinct volcano, and the plain is strewn with basalt and debris. He thinks Khirbet Minyeh the site of Capernaum. Josephus says the fountain Capharnaum waters the plain. This may correspond to the modern Ain et Tabighah, the water of which being brought past Khirbet Minyeh waters the plain, and would naturally take its name Capharnaum from that place (presuming that it was Capernaum). The source is only three quarters of a mile away, whereas it is one mile and three quarters from Tel Hum and all the water was carried in an opposite direction, so that it could hardly have taken its name from Tel Hum. In John 6:16, etc., we read "the disciples went by ship over the sea toward Capernaum (the same side as Tiberias), and the sea arose by reason of a great wind that blew"; then Jesus walked on the sea to them, and "immediately the ship was at the land where they went."

The day following, when the people on the other side of the sea (the eastern side) saw that there was none other boat there save the one whereinto His disciples were entered, ... howbeit there came other boats from Tiberias, nigh unto the place where they did eat bread ... they also took shipping, and came to Capernaum seeking for Jesus; and when they had found Him on the other side ... they said, ... When camest Thou here?" In Matthew 14:22 "Jesus constrained His disciples to get into a ship and go unto the other side. And He went up into a mountain apart to pray .... But the ship was now in the midst of the sea, tossed with waves, for the wind was contrary." It might seem strange that the people did not suppose Jesus had used one of the return boats which had come from Tiberias, to cross back to that side in the night.

Matthew undesignedly shows why they could not suppose so, namely, because "the wind was contrary," i.e. blowing from Tiberias and Capernaum; owing to this the ships, probably fishing vessels, were driven to the opposite side for shelter for the night, for what else could have taken to the desert eastern side so many boats as sufficed to convey the people across (Matthew 14:24) back again? Their question, "Rabbi, when camest Thou here?" implies plainly that under the circumstances they considered that His crossing in the night could only have been by some extraordinary means. The mention of many ships coming from Tiberias explains also how the people could take shipping to Capernaum after it had been stated there was no other boat there save that which took the disciples. The undesigned harmony of details, incidentally and separately noticed by the two evangelists, confirms their truthfulness, and therefore the miracle of Jesus' walking on the sea. The Gospels - according to Matthew, Mark, and Luke - never use the designation "sea of Tiberias" (still bahr Τubariyeh ), but the local name," sea" or "lake of Galilee," which shows they must have written before that became the universal designation, as it had in the time of John's writing.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Tiberias
Good vision; the navel
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Tiberias, Sea of
See GALILEE, SEA OF.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Tiberias
Tiberias (tî-bç'ri-as). A town in Galilee, on the western shore of the sea of Tiberias. John 6:1; John 6:23. Our Lord never visited it. He was often in the immediate neighborhood; but we never read of his entering Tiberias. It was the seat for centuries of a famous academy, and to the present day it is one of the four holy cities. Near to Tiberias are the celebrated hot baths of Hammam. The present city contains about 2000 inhabitants.

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Tiberias
a city situated in a small plain, surrounded by mountains, on the western coast of the sea of Galilee, which, from this city, was also called the sea of Tiberias. Tiberias was erected by Herod Antipas, and so called in honour of Tiberius Caesar. He is supposed to have chosen, for the erection of his new city, a spot where before stood a more obscure place called Chenereth or Cinnereth, which also gave its name to the adjoining lake or sea.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Tiberias
A city of Galilee, founded by Herod Antipas, and namely by him in honor of the emperor Tiberius. A more ancient and greater city, perhaps Chinneroth, seems previously to have flourished and gone to ruin near the same site, on the south. Tiberias was situated on the western shore of the lake of Gennesareth, about two hours' ride from the place where the Jordan issues from the lake. In the vicinity of the city were hot springs, which were much celebrated. The lake is also sometimes, called from the city, the sea of Tiberias, John 6:1,23 21:1 . See SEA 4.

After the destruction of Jerusalem, Tiberias was celebrated as the seat of a flourishing school of Jewish learning. The crusaders held it for a time, and erected a church, in which the Arabs have since housed their cattle. Modern Tubariyeh lies on a narrow undulating plain between the high table-land and the sea. It was half destroyed by an earthquake in 1837, and has a population of only twenty-five hundred souls, nearly one-third of whom are Jews. The walls are little more than heaps of ruins, the castle is much shattered, and the place has an aspect of extreme wretchedness and filth. As the Arabs say, "The king of the fleas holds his court at Tubariyeh." South of the town are numerous remains of the ancient city or cities extending for a mile and a half, nearly to the hot springs. The waters of these springs are nauseous and salt, and too hot for immediate use, 136 degrees to 144 degrees; but the baths are much resorted to for the cure of rheumatic diseases, etc.

Sentence search

Tiberias - Tiberias (tî-bç'ri-as). A town in Galilee, on the western shore of the sea of Tiberias. He was often in the immediate neighborhood; but we never read of his entering Tiberias. Near to Tiberias are the celebrated hot baths of Hammam
Tiberias - The town of Tiberias was on the western shore of Lake Galilee (also called the Sea of Galilee and the Sea of Tiberias) (John 6:1; John 6:23). Whereas towns on the northern shore were largely Jewish and were the scene of much of Jesus’ ministry, Tiberias was almost entirely Gentile
Rakkath - ” Fortified town in the territory of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 ), either at Tiberias or else at tell Eqlatiyeh about one and one half miles northwest of Tiberias
Rakkath - ” Fortified town in the territory of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 ), either at Tiberias or else at tell Eqlatiyeh about one and one half miles northwest of Tiberias
Tiberias - Antipas built in Tiberias a Roman stadium and palace adorned with images of animals which offended the Jews, as did also its site on an ancient burial ground. On the western shore toward the southern end of the sea of Galilee or Tiberias, as John alone calls the sea. John is the only New Testament writer who mentions Tiberias. Tiberias stood on the strip of land, two miles long and a quarter of a mile broad, between the water and the steep hills which elsewhere come down to the water's edge. Our Lord avoided Tiberias on account of the cunning and unscrupulous character of Herod Antipas whose headquarters were there (Luke 13:32); Herod never saw Him until just before the crucifixion (Luke 23:8). Christ chose the plain of Gennesaret at the head of the lake, where the population was at once dense and Jewish; and, as being sent to the lost sheep of the house of Israel, kept away from Tiberias. After Jerusalem's overthrow Tiberias was spared by the Romans because the people favored rather than opposed the conquerors' arms. The Mishna was compiled in Tiberias by Rabbi Judah Haqodesh, A. Jerusalem, Hebron, Safed, and Tiberias are the four holy places in which the Jews say if prayer without ceasing were not offered the world would fall into chaos. The Romans recognized the patriarch of Tiberias and empowered him to appoint his subordinate ministers who should visit all the distant colonies of Jews, and to receive contributions from the Jews of the whole Roman empire. ... The colony round Tiberias flourished under the emperors Antoninus Plus, Alexander Severus, and Julian, in the second and third centuries. The patriarchate of Tiberias finally ceased in 414 A. ) The eminent Maimonides laboured and was buried at Tiberias in 1204 A. A Jewish idea is that Messiah will emerge from the lake, proceed to Tiberias and Safed, then set His throne on the highest peak in Galilee
Hammath - It is identified with the warm baths (the heat of the water ranging from 136 degrees to 144 degrees) still found on the shore a little to the south of Tiberias under the name of Hummam Tabariyeh ("Bath of Tiberias")
Ham'Math - ( Joshua 19:35 ) It was near Tiberias, one mile distant, and had its name Chammath, "hot baths," because it contained those of Tiberias
Lassharon - that between Mount Tabor and Tiberias. of Tiberias, which may possibly represent Lassharon (Conder)
Tiberius - Tiberias Claudius Nero, Augustus' step-son and successor as emperor. Son of Tiberias Claudius Nero and Livia. ... The author of the name, Christ, in the reign of Tiberias was visited with capital punishment by the governor Pontius Pilate. " In Luke 3:1 John the Baptist's (six months senior to our Lord) ministry is set down in the 15th year of Tiberias' "principate" (hegemonia ). Augustus admitted Tiberias to share the empire two or three years before his own death, so that "the 15th year" is to be dated from the co-partnership at the end of A
Rakkath - The old name of Tiberias, according to the Rabbins
Tiberias - a city situated in a small plain, surrounded by mountains, on the western coast of the sea of Galilee, which, from this city, was also called the sea of Tiberias. Tiberias was erected by Herod Antipas, and so called in honour of Tiberius Caesar
Chinnereth, Chinneroth, Sea of - The lake subsequently called LAKE OF GENNESARET, SEA OF Tiberias,and SEA OFGALILEE,q
Adamah - Red earth, a fortified city of Naphtali, probably the modern Damieh, on the west side of the sea of Tiberias (Joshua 19:33,36 )
Ziddim - Sides, a town of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 ), has been identified with Kefr-Hattin, the "village of the Hittites," about 5 miles west of Tiberias
Gath-Hepher - It lay near Sepphoris, on a road leading to Tiberias
Masora - ) A Jewish critical work on the text of the Hebrew Scriptures, composed by several learned rabbis of the school of Tiberias, in the eighth and ninth centuries
Cin'Neroth - (1 Kings 15:20 ) This was possibly the small enclosed district north of Tiberias, and by the side of the lake, afterwards known as "the plain of Gennesareth
Magdala - It was on the west shore of the Lake of Tiberias, and is now probably the small obscure village called el-Mejdel, about 3 miles north-west of Tiberias
Doctor - Schools were established after the destruction of Jerusalem at Babylon and Tiberias, in which academical degrees were conferred on those who passed a certain examination. Those of the school of Tiberias were called by the title "rabbi," and those of Babylon by that of "master
Rak'Kath - ( Joshua 19:35 ) It was on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, not far from the warm baths of Tiberias
Zer - of Tiberias
Madon - Strife, a Canaanitish city in the north of Palestine (Joshua 11:1 ; 12:19 ), whose king was slain by Joshua; perhaps the ruin Madin, near Hattin, some 5 miles west of Tiberias
Adami-Nekeb - of Tiberias
Ziddim - of Tiberias
Tiberias - Tiberias (Τιβεριάς). Our Lord, so far as is known, never visited Tiberias, it being His custom to avoid Gentile cities. The only reference to the city in the NT is John 6:23, in which it is stated that ‘there came boats from Tiberias unto the place where they ate the bread after the Lord had given thanks’ (cf. the Jews had actually dropped the name Tiberias and reverted to the ancient name Rakkath. ] Talmud, Tiberias is sometimes identified with Rakkath, sometimes with Hammath, and sometimes with Chinnereth (cf. —Herod Antipas is supposed to have completed the building of Tiberias about a. 70), Tiberias became the chief seat of the Jews and of Jewish learning. the Sanhedrin, which had been shifted from Jerusalem to Jamnia and then to Sepphoris, was established at Tiberias under the presidency of the celebrated Rabbi Judah the Holy. Among the famous tombs of Tiberias are those of Maimonides, and Rabbis ‘Akiba and Jochanan. To-day Tiberias has a population of approximately 4000 souls, of whom about two-thirds are Jews and the other third Mohammedans and Christians of different sects. ... Tiberias is hot and fever-haunted. Schürer speaks of Tiberias as ‘the most beautiful spot in Galilee,’ which, however, is an exaggeration. The study of the Talmud still flourishes in Tiberias. ‘Tiberias’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible : Buhl, GAP [Note: AP Geographic des alten Palästina. ‘Tiberias’ in EBi [Note: Bi Encyclopaedia Biblica
Nekeb - It has with probability, been identified with Seiyadeh, nearly 2 miles east of Bessum, a ruin half way between Tiberias and Mount Tabor
Adamah - of Tiberias
Ziddim - ” Fortified town in Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 ), perhaps identifical with Hattin el-Qadim about eight miles west northwest of Tiberias
Magdala - City on the west of the Lake of Tiberias
Chinnereth - Lyre, the singular form of the word (Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 19:35 ), which is also used in the plural form, Chinneroth, the name of a fenced city which stood near the shore of the lake of Galilee, a little to the south of Tiberias. The Sea of Chinnereth (Numbers 34:11 ; Joshua 13:27 ), or of Chinneroth (Joshua 12 :: 3 ), was the "lake of Gennesaret" or "sea of Tiberias" (Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 11:2 )
Dalmanutha - The exact situation of this place is uncertain; it lay, however, on the western shore of the sea of Galilee, north of Tiberias
Kartan - It was probably near the north-western shore of the Sea of Tiberias, identical with the ruined village el-Katanah
Madon - The site has been identified as the summit of Qarn Hattim, northwest of Tiberias
Chinnereth - A fenced city of Naphtali, on the lake, or sea, of the same name; afterward called Gennesar, or Gennesaret, and about three miles northwest of Tiberias, according to Fuerst
Dalmanutha - Magadan, Mark 8:10; Matthew 15:39; probably at ʾAin-el-Bârideh, on the west side of the sea, two miles from Tiberias, where are ruins
Tiberias - Tiberias . 16 22) on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee (called the ‘Sea of Tiberias’ in John 6:1 ; John 21:1 , and in modern Arabic), and named in honour of the Roman Emperor. After the fall of Jerusalem many of the Jews took up their abode in Tiberias, and by a strange reversal of fate this unclean city became a most important centre of Rabbinic teaching. ... Constantine built a church and established a bishopric at Tiberias, but Christianity never flourished there. ... For the ‘ Sea of Tiberias ,’ see Galilee [Sea of]
Hammath - Probably on the south of Tiberias, where there are hot springs (as its name implies)
Dalmanutha - Mark says that Jesus Christ embarked with his disciples on the lake of Tiberias, and came to Dalmanutha, Mark 8:10 , but St
Raish lakish - (3century) Talmudic sage, resident of Tiberias, Israel
Jeremiah ben abba - (4th century) Talmudic sage, born in [Babylon] but emigrated to Tiberias, Israel, where he diligently studied under Rabbis Abahu and Zeira
Tiberias - 2,3) that to build Tiberias many tombs had to be taken away, which made it ceremonially an unclean place, so that no Jews would live there except those who were compelled, and others who were bribed by the founder. In later days, however, along with Jerusalem, Hebron, and Safed, Tiberias was classed by the Jews as one of their four holy cities, renowned as seats of learning
Gath-Hepher - ] 2 Kings 14:25 ), and places it 2 Roman miles from Sepphoris ( Seffûrieh ), on the road to Tiberias. of the Tiberias road, 1 / 2 mile W
Sea - Thus the sea of Galilee, or of Tiberias, or of Cinnereth, is no other than the lake of Tiberias, or Gennesareth, in Galilee
Tibe'Rias, - Tiberias was the capital of Galilee from the time of its origin until the reign of Herod Agrippa II. It is remarkable that the Gospels give us no information that the Saviour who spent so much of his public life in Galilee, ever visited Tiberias. --Tiberias has an interesting history apart from its strictly biblical associations. Tiberias is described by Dr
Ahlab - of the lake of Tiberias
Lake - There are three lakes spoken of in Judea, namely, the Asphaltites, Tiberias, and Semechon
Hammath - It may be located at tell Raqqat, just north of Tiberias. Others have tried to locate it at the famous hot springs of Hammam Tabiriyeh, south of Tiberias, but archaeologists have found no evidence of Iron Age occupation there
Magdala - The town was located on a main highway coming from Tiberias
Gergesenes - (See Matthew 8:28) It is more than probable, that this was the same nation as is called in the Old Testament Girgashites; one of the cities of Canaan beyond the sea of Tiberias
Chinnereth - Tiberias is supposed by Jerome to have afterwards occupied its site
Hammath - ("hot baths"), namely, of Tiberias
Samuel bar abba - In his youth, Samuel studied in Tiberias, Israel, at the Torah academy of Rabbi Judah the Prince
Tiberias, Sea of - , we read "the disciples went by ship over the sea toward Capernaum (the same side as Tiberias), and the sea arose by reason of a great wind that blew"; then Jesus walked on the sea to them, and "immediately the ship was at the land where they went. howbeit there came other boats from Tiberias, nigh unto the place where they did eat bread . " It might seem strange that the people did not suppose Jesus had used one of the return boats which had come from Tiberias, to cross back to that side in the night. blowing from Tiberias and Capernaum; owing to this the ships, probably fishing vessels, were driven to the opposite side for shelter for the night, for what else could have taken to the desert eastern side so many boats as sufficed to convey the people across (Matthew 14:24) back again? Their question, "Rabbi, when camest Thou here?" implies plainly that under the circumstances they considered that His crossing in the night could only have been by some extraordinary means. The mention of many ships coming from Tiberias explains also how the people could take shipping to Capernaum after it had been stated there was no other boat there save that which took the disciples. The Gospels - according to Matthew, Mark, and Luke - never use the designation "sea of Tiberias" (still bahr Τubariyeh ), but the local name," sea" or "lake of Galilee," which shows they must have written before that became the universal designation, as it had in the time of John's writing
Hauran - Ezekiel 47:16 , was originally a small district south of Damascus, and east of the sea of Tiberias, but was afterwards extended to the south and east, and under the Romans was called Auranitis
Saron - (Hebrew: sharon, plain) ... (1) a maritime plain 55 miles long between Jaffa and Mount Carmel in Judea, ranked with Carmel and Lebanon for its luxuriant vegetation (Isaiah 35) ... (2) the country between Mount Thabor and the Lake of Tiberias; Saint Peter visited here and cured a man sick eight years with the palsy (Acts 9) ... (3) region east of the Jordan, near Galaad (1Par 5) ...
Galilee, Sea of - ; then, coming southward, was Bethsaida of Galilee, with the plain of Gennesaret (or Chinnereth) near; then Magdala, Dalmanutha and Tiberias on the west. These places being near accounts for the sea being called the LAKE OF GENNESARET and the SEA OF Tiberias and of CHINNERETH
Chinnereth - The site of the town is uncertain, but it follows Rakkath (probably Tiberias), and may have been in the plain of Gennesaret (cf
Nobah - end of the sea of Tiberias
Tiberias - Tiberias was situated on the western shore of the lake of Gennesareth, about two hours' ride from the place where the Jordan issues from the lake. The lake is also sometimes, called from the city, the sea of Tiberias, John 6:1,23 21:1 . ... After the destruction of Jerusalem, Tiberias was celebrated as the seat of a flourishing school of Jewish learning
Nathanael - He was one of those to whom the Lord showed himself alive after his resurrection, at the Sea of Tiberias
Receipt of Custom - The publicans had houses or booths built for them at the foot of bridges, at the mouth of rivers, by the sea shore, and the parts of the lake of Gennesareth, or sea of Tiberias, to collect the taxes on passengers and merchandise
Magdala - 5 miles north of Tiberias, birthplace or home of Mary Magdalen (Luke 8); probably the Magdalel of the tribe of Nephtali (Joshua 19)
Sea of Galilee - In Bible times it was known also as the Sea of Chinnereth (Numbers 34:11), the Lake of Gennesaret (Luke 5:1) and the Sea of Tiberias (John 6:1; John 6:16-25; John 21:1)
Hammath - of Tiberias, famous for its hot baths
Geshur - Bridge, the name of a district or principality of Syria near Gilead, between Mount Hermon and the Lake of Tiberias (2 Samuel 15:8 ; 1 Chronicles 2:23 )
Iturae'a - (Genesis 25:15,16 ) It adjoined Trachonitis, and lay along the base of Libanus between Tiberias and Damascus
Achaia - Tiberias united the two districts into an imperial province under procurators; but Claudius again restored it to the senate under a proconsul, so that Luke was correct in calling Gallio a proconsul (ἀνθύπατος)or deputy
Issachar - The tribe of Issachar had its portion in one of the best parts of the land of Canaan, along the great plain or valley of Jezreel, with the half tribe of Manasseh to the south, that of Zebulun to the north, the Mediterranean to the west, and Jordan, with the extremity of the sea of Tiberias, to the east
Magdala - It lay near the shore of the Sea of Galilee, at its most westerly point, three miles northwest of Tiberias; in the southern part of a small plain on which stood also Capernaum at the other end, and Dalmanutha in its immediate vicinity, Matthew 15:39 ; Mark 8:10
Tiberias, Sea of - Tiberias had by this time become an important city, having been spared by the Romans, and made the capital of the province when Jerusalem was destroyed
Bartholomew - He was one of the disciples to whom our Lord appeared at the Sea of Tiberias after his resurrection (John 21:2 )
Cinnereth - ), and was probably that enclosed district north of Tiberias afterwards called "the plain of Gennesaret
Adamah - A city in Naphtali's territory (Joshua 19:36 ) near where the Jordan River joins the sea of Tiberias, perhaps modern Hagar ed-Damm
Capharnaum - There is some doubt as to the site of Capharnaum, although it is identified with Tell-Hum on the north bank of the Lake of Tiberias
Nathanael - " He was one of the disciples to whom Christ appeared at the sea of Tiberias after his resurrection, John 21:2 ; and after witnessing the ascension returned with the other apostles to Jerusalem, Acts 1:4,12,13
Bashan - The name of the territory east of the Sea of Tiberias. It included Salecah ( Salkhat , on the borders of the desert), Edrei ( ed-Der‘a ?), Ashtaroth (perhaps Tell Ashareh ), and Golan, one of the cities of refuge, the name of which may be preserved in the Jaulan , the region immediately east of the Sea of Tiberias
Fifteen, Fifteenth - , "five and tenth") is found In Luke 3:1 , where Luke dates the reign of Tiberias from the period of his joint rule with Augustus
Snow - No doubt Herod Antipas, at his feasts in Tiberias, enjoyed also from this very source the modern luxury of ice-water
Cana - Others have identified it with Kefr Kenna, which lies on the direct road to the Sea of Galilee, about 5 miles north-east of Nazareth, and 12 in a direct course from Tiberias
Gad'Ara, - a strong city situated near the river Hieromax, six miles southeast of the Sea of Galilee, over against Scythopolis and Tiberias, and 16 Roman miles distant from each of those places
Galilee, Sea of - Once John called it the “sea of Tiberias” (Matthew 6:1 ). The other lake towns of importance were Bethsaida, which means “the fishing place”, and Tiberias, a Gentile city constructed by Herod Antipas when Jesus was a young man
Galilee, Sea of - "The sea of Tiberias" is another designation, from the city (John 6:1). Nine cities stood on the shores of the lake, of which only two are now inhabited, namely, Magdala, consisting of a few mud huts, and Tiberias, sadly changed from its ancient prosperity. The view from the Nazareth road to Tiberias is beautiful. On a western recess stands Tiberias. The fish are now taken with a hand net jerked round the fish by the fisher, usually naked, along the shore (John 21:7); or else crumbs of bread mixed with bichloride of mercury are scattered to poison the fish, and the floating dead bodies are picked up for the Tiberias market (Porter, Handbook, p. that brought vessels from Tiberias to the N
Betharbel - of Tiberias, remarkable for its caves, hard to approach and still more to storm
Zaanaim - and the Talmud, the letter b, which in Hebrew means "in," should be taken as a part of the word following, and the phrase would then be "unto the oak of Bitzanaim," a place which has been identified with the ruins of Bessum, about half-way between Tiberias and Mount Tabor
Boar - At present wild boars frequent the marshes around the upper Jordan, and have been found on Mount Carmel, and in large herds near the sea of Tiberias
Aphik - It has been identified with the modern Fik, 6 miles east of the Sea of Galilee, opposite Tiberias
Matthew - His ordinary abode was at Capernaum, and his office probably on the main road, near the Sea of Tiberias; here, in the midst of his business, he was called by Jesus to follow him, Matthew 9:9 Mark 2:14
Galilee, Sea of - ), or ‘the sea’ ( John 6:16 ), we find Lake of Gennesaret (only in Luke 5:1 ), Sea of Tiberias ( John 21:1 , and also as an explanatory or alternative name in John 6:1 ), but most frequently Sea of Galilee , which seems to have been the normal name. The modern name is Bahr Tubarîya , which is often rendered in English as ‘Lake of Tiberias,’ by which name the Sea is now frequently described (as in Baedeker’s Syria and Palestine ). Such were Tiberias, Bethsaida, Capernaum, Chorazin, Magdala, and others
Bethsaida -
A town in Galilee, on the west side of the sea of Tiberias, in the "land of Gennesaret
Chinnereth - The sea or lake otherwise called the Sea of Galilee, Lake of Gennesaret, or Sea of Tiberias
Mag'Dala - towers, which stood in Palestine, was probably the place of that name which is mentioned in the Jerusalem Talmud as near Tiberias, and this again is as probably the modern el-Mejdel , a miserable little Muslim village, of twenty huts on the water's edge at the southeast corner of the plain of Gennesareth
Tiberias - A city, the modern Tubarich, on the western shore of the Sea of Tiberias. 70), Tiberias became one of the chief residences of the Jews in Palestine
Gennesaret, Sea of - It is also called "the Sea of Tiberias
Fishing, the Art of - At the Sea of Tiberias (John 21:1-14 ), in obedience to his direction, the disciples cast their net "on the right side of the ship," and enclosed so many that "they were not able to draw it for the multitude of fishes
Sea - THE SEA OF GALILEE,Mark 1:16 ; also called the 'Sea of Tiberias,' John 21:1 ; the 'Sea of Chinnereth,' Numbers 34:11 ; Joshua 12:3 ; Joshua 13 :27; the 'Lake of Gennesaret,' Luke 5:1
Bartholomew - The supposition also acquires additional probability from considering, that Nathanael is particularly mentioned among the Apostles to whom Christ appeared at the sea of Tiberias, after his resurrection; Simon Peter, Thomas, and Nathanael, of Cana in Galilee; the sons of Zebedee, namely, James and John; with two other of his disciples, probably Andrew and Philip, John 21:2
Sharon - Jerom, is a canton between Mount Tabor and the sea of Tiberias
Zebulun - The inhabitants of this region in the time of Christ were highly favored by his instructionsNazareth and Cana, Capernaum, Magdala, and Tiberias being all in these limits
Earthquake - So late as 1837 one occurred in the vicinity of the Sea of Galilee, by which about a third part of Tiberias was destroyed, and thousands of people perished there and in the towns near by
Beth-Shean, or Beth-Shan - The place is now called Beisan, and is about twenty-four miles south of Tiberias
Philip (st.) And st. James' Day - Philip wasa native of Bethsaida, a town bordering on the Sea of Tiberias andwas one of the first of our Lord's disciples and was His constantcompanion and follower
Rezon - of Damascus and not far from the Sea of Tiberias, whom David overthrew ( 2 Samuel 8:3 ff
Fish - In NT times fish-curing was extensively carried on at Taricheæ on the Lake of Tiberias
Geshur, Geshuri, Geshurites - The word Geshur signifies bridge; and in the border of the region, where, according to the above data, we must place Geshur, between mount Hermon and the lake of Tiberias, there still exists an ancient stone bridge of four arches over the Jordan, called Jisr-Beni-Jakub, that is, the bridge of the children of Jacob
Naphtali - ... The tribe of Naphtali, called Nephtalim in Matthew 4:15 , were located in a rich and fertile portion of northern Palestine; having Asher on the west, the upper Jordan and part of the sea of Tiberias on the east; and running north into the Lebanon range, some lower offshoots of which prolonged to the south formed the "mountains of Naphtali," Joshua 19:32-39 20:7
Towel - 5) of the bath-towels used at the hot baths of Tiberias and elsewhere
Kedesh - Usually identified with modern khirbet Qedish, about two miles south of Tiberias
Boar - Pococke observed very large herds of wild boars on the side of Jordan, where it flows out of the sea of Tiberias; and saw several of them on the other side lying among the reeds by the sea
Fish, Fisher - The Sea of Tiberias also still abounds in fish, Luke 5:5 John 21:6-11
Galilee - The Valley was adjacent to the sea of Tiberias. Its principal cities were Tiberias, Chorazin, Bethsaida, Nazareth, Cana, Capernaum, Nain, Caesarea of Palestine, and Ptolemais. This inland sea, or more properly lake, which derives its several names, the lake of Tiberias, the sea of Galilee, and the lake of Gennesareth, from the territory which forms its western and south-western border, is computed to be between seventeen and eighteen miles in length, and from five to six in breadth. The mountains on the east come close to its shore, and the country on that side has not a very agreeable aspect: on the west, it has the plain of Tiberias, the high ground of the plain of Hutin, or Hottein, the plain of Gennesareth, and the foot of those hills by which you ascend to the high mountain of Saphet. Six thousand five hundred persons are stated to have perished in this naval engagement, and in the battle of Tarichaea, beside twelve hundred who were afterward massacred in cold blood, by order of Vespasian, in the amphitheatre at Tiberias, and a vast number who were given to Agrippa as slaves
Jabbok - a small river which falls into the Jordan below the sea of Tiberias
Fish, Fisher, Fishing - ’... It is legitimate to suppose that a trade in fish was carried on between the Lake of Tiberias and the rest of the country. ... The fishermen sometimes carried on their trade in partnership, as is still the case at the present day, when the fishermen of Tiberias form a kind of corporation with fixed rules. ... The waters of the Lake of Tiberias are exceptionally rich in fish, especially by the shore of el-Batiha (to the east of the mouth of the Jordan), and in the bay of et-Tabigha. ... The fish of the Lake of Tiberias have been minutely studied and described by two experts, Dr. Out of 39 (Lortet) or 43 (Tristram) species known in Palestine, from 22 to 24 are found in the Lake of Tiberias and its immediate vicinity. 5 [with photograph of two fishermen of the Lake of Tiberias casting their nets]
Bethsaida - of and close to the sea of Tiberias, in the land of Gennesareth (Mark 6:45-53; John 6:16-17; John 1:44; John 12:21)
Josephus, Flavius - Josephus' Life focuses primarily upon the six-month period in which he was commander of Jewish forces in the Galilee and refutes the charge made by Justus of Tiberias that Josephus had organized the revolt in the Galilee
Eustochius (6), Patriarch of Jerusalem - of Tiberias, Damasus bp
Magdala - To this may be added the testimony of the Rabbins, that Magdala was adjacent to the city of Tiberias (Otho, Lex Rabb. 722), ‘Magdalum’ is located between Tiberias and Capernaum; and in the time of Quaresmius (17th cent. From the same source he gathers the statements that Magdala, which was a Sabbath-day’s journey from Tiberias, was celebrated for its dye-works and its manufactories of fine woollen textures, of which eighty are mentioned. It is three miles north of Tiberias, and almost the same distance south of Khan Minyeh
Judea - The portion of Zebulon, bounded by Asher on the west, and Mount Tabor on the south, joined on the east the portion of Naphtali, which occupied the borders of the lake Gennesareth, or sea of Tiberias. ... Samaria, lying between Judea and Galilee, in 32 15' north latitude, extended along the sea coast from Joppa to Dora, and along the river Jordan from the rivulet of Alexandrium to the southern extremity of the sea of Tiberias; comprehending the territory of the tribe of Ephraim, of the half tribe of Manasseh, and part of Issachar. Its principal towns were Capernaum, at the northern extremity of the lake of Gennesareth; Bethsaida, a considerable village a few leagues south of Capernaum; Cinnereth, south of Bethsaida, rebuilt by Herod Antipas, and named Tiberias; Tarichaea, a considerable town at the efflux of the river Jordan from the sea of Tiberias, thirty stadia south from the town of Tiberias; Nazareth, two leagues north-west of Mount Tabor, and equally distant from the lake of Gennesareth and the sea coast; Arbela, six miles west of Nazareth; Sepphoris, or Dio-Caesarea, now Sefouri, a large and well fortified town, about five leagues north north-west of Mount Tabor; Zabulon, a strong and populous place, sixty stadia south-east of Ptolemais; Acre, or Accon, seven miles north from the promontory of Carmel, afterward enlarged and called Ptolemais by Ptolemy I, of Egypt, and in the time of the crusades distinguished by the name of Acre, the last city possessed by the Christians in Syria, and was taken and destroyed by the Sultan Serapha, of Egypt, in 1291; Kedes, or Cydissus, a Levitical city at the foot of Mount Panium, twenty miles south-east of Tyre; Dan, originally Laish, on the north boundary of the Holy Land, about thirty miles south- east of Sidon; Paneas, near to Dan, or, according to some, only a different name for the same place, was repaired by Philip, son of Herod the Great, and by him named Caesarea, in honour of Augustus, with the addition of Philippi, to distinguish it from the other town of the same name in Samaria; Jotapata, the strongest town in Galilee, about four leagues north north-east of Dio-Caesarea; and Japha and Gischala, two other fortified places in the same district. ... Peraea, though the name would denote any extent of country beyond Jordan, is more particularly applied to that district in 32 north latitude, which formerly composed the territories of Sihon, the Amorite, and Og, king of Bashan; extending from the river Arnon (which flows through an extensive plain into the Dead Sea) to the mount of Gilead, where the Jordan issues from the sea of Tiberias; and which fell to the lot of the tribes of Reuben and Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh. Gaulonitis, a narrow strip of land between Batanaea and the shore of the sea of Tiberias, stretching northward to Mount Hermon, and containing Gamala, a strong town near the southern extremity of the sea of Tiberias; Argob, between this sea and Mount Hippos; Julias, supposed to be the same as Chorazin, and by others to be Bethsaida; and Seleuca, a fortified place on the east border of Lacus Samochonitis. Auranitis, or Ituraea, a mountainous and barren tract north of Batantaea, and bounded on the west by a branch of Mount Hermon, contained Bostra, or Bozra, about fifty miles east from the sea of Tiberias, bordering on Arabia Petraea, afterward enlarged by Trajan, and named Trajana Bostra; and Trachonitis, in 33 15' north latitude, between Hermon and Antilibanus, eastward from the sources of Jordan, and containing Baal-gad, Mispah, Paneas, or Caesarea Philippi, and AEnos, nearly twenty-five miles east of Panaeas, and as far south south-west of Damascus. One of them, namely, Scythopolis, already described in the account of Samaria, was situated to the west of Jordan; but the other nine were all to the east of that river, namely, Gadara, or Kedar, a strong place on a hill, the capital of Peraea in the time of Josephus, about sixty stadia east from the sea of Tiberias, and much frequented for its hot baths: Hippos, sometimes called Susitha, thirty stadia northwest of Gadara; Dium, or Dion, of which the situation is unknown, but conjectured by D'Anville to have been about seven leagues eastward from Pella, a considerable town supplied with copious fountains, on the river Jabbok, fourteen miles south-east of Gadara, and celebrated as the place to which the Christians retired, by divine admonition, before the destruction of Jerusalem; Canatha, south-east of Caesarea, and between the Jordan and Mount Hermon; Garasa, afterward Jaras, three leagues north- east from the upper extremity of the sea of Tiberias, and much noted during the crusades; Rabbath-Ammon, the capital of the Ammonites, south-east of Ramoth, and near the source of the Jabbok, on the confines of Arabia, afterward called Philadelphia by Ptolemy Philadelphus, from whom it had received considerable improvements, of which the ruins are still visible; Abila, four leagues east from Gadara, in a fertile tract between the river Hieromax and Mount Gilead; and Capitolais, a town in Batanaea, five or six leagues east north-east of Gadara
Fort, Fortification - Examples of huge, dressed stone walls and gate towers of the Hellenistic/Roman Periods may be seen today at Samaria, Caesarea Maritima, and Tiberias
Gadarenes - A region about Gadara, an important city about 6 miles south-east of the Sea of Galilee, and 16 miles from Tiberias; now called Um Keis
Galilee Sea of - It was also called the "Sea of Tiberias," from the city of that name, John 6:1, and "Sea of Chinneroth" in the Old Testament
Galilee - Maimonides was buried at Tiberias. Hot springs at Tiberias and elsewhere, and not infrequent earthquakes, indicate a continuance of volcanic and analogous energies. Besides these there was the cultivated European class the inhabitants of the Greek cities that surrounded the Sea of Tiberias, and the military representatives of the dominant power of Rome
Jordan - But besides these, there is a third and longer stream, which rises beyond the northern limit of Palestine, near Hasbeia on the west side of mount Hermon, flows twenty-four miles to the south, and unites with the other streams before they enter the "waters of Merom," now lake Huleh, the Jordan flows about nine miles south-ward to the sea of Tiberias, through which its clear and smooth course may be traced twelve miles to the lower end. ... Between these two seas, that of Tiberias and the Dead Sea, lies the great valley or plain of the Jordan, 2 Kings 25:4 2 Chronicles 4:17 . The sea of Tiberias lies 312 (according to Lynch, 653) feet below the level of the Mediterranean, and the Dead Sea 1,316 feet; hence the fall of the Jordan between the two seas Isaiah 1,000 feet
Sea of Galilee - The word ‘Sea’ (θάλασσα) stands alone in John 6:17-25, and the form ‘Sea of Tiberias’ (θάλασσα τῆς Τιβεριάδος) occurs in John 6:1; John 21:1. The modern designation, ‘Lake of Tiberias,’ does not occur in the NT. onwards the official designation became ‘Sea of Tiberias’; and as proof of this statement he cites the Palestinian Talmud. This reasoning, however, seems inconclusive; for, apart from the fact that the Palestinian Talmud contains much that is old, it seems impossible, in view of the conservatism of the Rabbis, that such a name as ‘Sea of Tiberias’ should be found in their writings, unless it had been in common use for a considerable time. רקח, which seems to justify the identification of Tiberias with the older Rakkath, Joshua 19:35; Megilla, 5b, 6a; G. 447) about 2½ miles long and ¼ of a mile broad at its widest part, and at the north end of this is the modern town of Tiberias. From this point onward to the Jordan the hills again extend down to the shore, but by gentler slopes than even to the south of Tiberias. , and midway between Tiberias and Kersa it is 114. Josephus Vita, 16), south of Tiberias (132° to 144°), ‘Ain Bârideh (80°), ‘Ain Mudauwarah (73°), ‘Ain et-Tîn (82°), and ‘Ain et-Tâbigha (73° to 86°). A brackish taste can be perceived at different places, and especially at a point ⅔ across between Tiberias and Kersa, where in the warmer water great shoals of fish are wont to congregate. These springs are all more or less sulphurous, and in all the centuries they have been used for medicinal purposes—especially those at Tiberias (BJ ii. Ben Azzai taught on the shores of Tiberias (Erubin, 29a), and Rabbi Jehudah in the open air (Moed Katon, 16a). This may be understood by the fact that when a westerly wind is blowing, all may be smooth along the shores to the north and south of Tiberias and for a mile out, but there we may pass in a moment from the region of perfect calm into a gale so violent that the only chance of safety is to run before the wind to the eastern shore. A company of visitors were standing on the shore at Tiberias, and, noting the glassy surface of the water and the smallness of the Lake, they expressed doubts as to the possibility of such storms as those described in the Gospels
Galilee - The noted mountains of Galilee were Carmel, Gilboa, and Tabor; the towns were Nazareth, Cana, Tiberias, Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum
Reed - Hooker saw it on the banks of Lake Tiberias, a few miles north of the town
Masora - According to Elias Levita, they were the Jews of a famous school at Tiberias, about five hundred years after Christ, who composed, or at least began, the masora; whence they are called masorites and masoretic doctors. Buxtorf has written a masoretic commentary which he calls Tiberias
Sharon - 6) says was the name given to the district between Tabor and Tiberias
Fountain - Philip built Tiberias at the sulphureous hot springs S
Galilee - Lower Galilee is aid to have contained four hundred and four towns and villages, of which Josephus mentions Tiberias, Sepphoris, and Gabara, as the principal; though Capernaum and Nazareth are the most frequently mentioned in the New Testament, Mark 1:9 Luke 2:39 John 7:52 , etc
Sower, Parable of the - The discourse was addressed to a "great multitude" by the shore of Lake Tiberias
Gal'Ilee, Sea of - (Matthew 4:18 ) It was also called the "Sea of Tiberias," from the celebrated city of that name
Joram - It must be observed, however, that, according to the Talmud, the river bore the name of Jordan only between the Lake of Tiberias and the Dead Sea, a statement which is neither confirmed nor contradicted by the Bible, and cannot be proved in any way; we may add that, according to some writers, the present custom is exactly the opposite, for it is alleged—has the claim any foundation?—that at the present day only the part of the river above the lake is called , and the part below, îa. Almost immediately after leaving Lake Huleh, which is 7 feet above the level of the Mediterranean, the Jordan begins to fall below the level of the sea; the Lake of Tiberias is 682 feet, the Dead Sea 1292 feet, below it. ... The course of the Jordan is interrupted twice—first by the Lake of Huleh, a description of which occurs later in the course of the present article, then by the Lake of Tiberias or Sea of Galilee (which see); we have not to examine this here. These interruptions quite naturally cause us to divide the next part of this article into three sections: (a) the sources of the Jordan, (b) the Upper Jordan as far as Lake Tiberias, (c) the Lower Jordan from the Lake of Tiberias to the Dead Sea. —From the confluence, which we have just mentioned, to the Lake of Tiberias the course of the Jordan is unimportant from a historical point of view. For the description of the whole upper course of the Jordan from its sources to the Lake of Tiberias, including Lake Huleh, see Macgregor, The Rob Roy on the Jordan, 1869, 5th ed. —The Jordan issues from the Lake of Tiberias at a place called Bab et-Tum, leaving on the east the little modern village of Semakh, which has no bridge connecting it with the right bank, and as the river is not fordable at this place, the passage, naturally of frequent occurrence, is accomplished by means of boats. The distance in a straight line from the Lake of Tiberias to the Dead Sea is about 65 miles, but if we take into account all the sinuosities of the river it reaches a total of 200 miles. One of them, the Hieromax of the Greeks, the Yarmuk of the Rabbis, the Sherî‘at el-Manaḍireh of the Arabs, already mentioned above, flows down from the high plateau on the east of Lake Tiberias, and passes between the warm springs of el-Hammah and the ancient Gadara (modern Umm Keis). Yet on three occasions the attempt has been made to sail down its course from the Lake of Tiberias to the Dead Sea. , who passed up from Jericho to the Lake of Tiberias
Naphtali, Tribe of - ... Naphtali is now almost wholly a desert, the towns of Tiberias, on the shore of the Lake of Galilee, and Safed being the only places in it of any importance
Sharon - Tahor and Tiberias, and this is to-day represented by the village of Sârôna in the Ard el-Hamma N
Caves - ... Rock caverns abound along the shore of the sea of Tiberias, and were often used as tombs, the bodies being laid in excavated shelves at the sides
Zebulun - His portion extended along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, one end of it bordering on this sea, and the other on the sea of Tiberias, Joshua 19:10 , &c
Seed Growing Secretly, Parable of the - " The audience consisted of a "great multitude," mostly from Capharnaum, who remained on the shore while Jesus taught them many things in patables from a little boat on the Lake of Tiberias
Sea - , "the Red Sea," Acts 7:36 ; 1 Corinthians 10:1 ; Hebrews 11:29 ; the "sea" of Galilee or Tiberias, Matthew 4:18 ; 15:29 ; Mark 6:48,49 , where the acts of Christ testified to His Deity; John 6:1 ; 21:1 ; in general, e
ox, Oxen, Herd, Cattle - of Lake of Tiberias, and near Lake Huleh, the buffalo or jamus ( Bosbubalus ) is kept by the Bedouin; it yields excellent milk
Galilee - It included the towns of Nain, Nazareth, Cana, Tiberias, Magdala, Dalmanutha, Bethsaida, Chorazin, and Capernaum
Bath, Bathing - There are remains of such baths near Tiberias; those at Gadara and at Callirrhoë were very celebrated in ancient times
Judas - He was born at Gamala, a city of Gaulonitis near the southeastern shore of the lake of Tiberias
Jordan - ) Between Merom and lake Tiberias the banks are so thickly wooded as often to shut out the view of the water. The lake of Tiberias is 653 ft. Hot springs abound about Tiberias; and other tokens of volcanic action, tufa, etc. The Roman bridge of 10 arches, Jisr Semakh, was on the route from Tiberias to Gadara
Merom, Waters of - This reaches the lake Tiberias near Bethsaida, and constitutes "the waters of Merom," for Josephus (Ant
Reed - of Lake Tiberias
Brimstone - ... In the Graeco-Roman period the hot sulphur springs of Palestine, on both sides of the Dead Sea, at Tiberias, and in the valley of the Yarmuk, were used medicinally
Brimstone - ... In the Graeco-Roman period the hot sulphur springs of Palestine, on both sides of the Dead Sea, at Tiberias, and in the valley of the Yarmuk, were used medicinally
Desert - The name Arabah is specially applied to the deep valley of the Jordan (the Ghor of the Arabs), which extends from the lake of Tiberias to the Elanitic gulf
Boat (2) - To quell the revolt in Tiberias, Josephus mustered all the boats on the Lake, and they numbered as many as 230 (Josephus BJ ii
Adam - A city near the Jordan, towards the sea of Tiberias, at some distance from which the waters of the Jordan were heaped up for the passage of the Jews, Joshua 3:16
Galilee, Sea of - ... (John 6:1 ; 21:1 ) calls it the "sea of Tiberias" (q
Council - Its final seat was at Tiberias
Earthquake - Secondary quake centers are located in the Jordan Valley at Jericho and Tiberias
San'Hedrin - After several other changes, its seat was finally established at Tiberias, where it became extinct A
Mischna - Rabbi Judah on this occasion being rector of the school of Tiberias, and president of the sanhedrim in that place, undertook the work, and compiled it in six books, each consisting of several tracts, which altogether make up the number of sixty-three
Mishna - Rabbi Judah, who was at that time rector of the school at Tiberias in Galilee, and president of the sanhedrim at that place, undertook the work
Tree - Between the Lake Samochonites and the sea of Tiberias, the river Jordan is almost concealed by shady trees from the view of the traveller. Large herds of them are sometimes to be seen on the banks of the river, near the sea of Tiberias, lying among the reeds, or feeding under the trees
Towel - Similar was the act of Peter on the sea of Tiberias, when it is said "he girt his fisher's coat unto him, for he was naked
Cana - ’ From this village he made a descent during the night upon Tiberias (17)
Gal'Ilee - " Lower Galilee included the great plain of Esdraelon with its offshoots, which ran down to the Jordan and the Lake of Tiberias, and the whole of the hill country adjoining it on the north to the foot of the mountain range
Bethsaida - Should he not know to what province his birthplace belonged?" Philip only governed the eastern districts by the sea of Tiberias; but Galilee was the portion of his brother Antipas
Zebulun - Zebulun possessed the fisheries of lake Tiberias or the sea of Gennesareth
Talmud - It was the work of rabbi Jehuda (or Juda) Hakkadosh, who was the ornament of the school of Tiberias, and is said to have occupied him forty years
Caesarea Philippi - Philip rebuilt the city into a beautiful place and renamed it Caesarea Philippi in honor of Tiberias Caesar and himself
Herod - The city of Tiberias, which Antipas founded and named in honor of the emperor, was the most conspicuous monument of his long reign
Sea - The Hebrews give the name of sea to any large collection of water, Job 14:11 ; as to the lakes of Tiberias and Asphaltites, and also to the rivers Nile and Euphrates, Isaiah 11:15 18:2 21:1 Jeremiah 51:36,42 . ... In 1848, Lieutenant Lynch of the United States' navy passed down the Jordan from the Sea of Tiberias, with two metallic boats, and spent three weeks in a survey of the Sea of Sodom. The SEA OF Tiberias or of Galilee; the lake of Gennesareth, or of Cimmereth, Numbers 34:11 , is so called from the adjacent country, or from some of the principal cities on its shores
Talmud - ... The Jerusalem Talmud was not compiled in Jerusalem but in the centers of Tiberias, Caesarea, and Sepphoris in Palestine, since Jerusalem ceased to be a major center of Jewish learning after the destruction of the second Temple in A
Roads - Starting at Acco (Ptolemais), it ran, according to Ramsay, till it came to Karn Hattin near to Cana, and then almost due cast to Tiberias
New Testament - Luke 2:42-46 ... 14 Tiberias emperor of Rome: reigns alone... 17 Caiaphas made high priest... 26 Pontius Pilate procurator of Judaea... John commences his ministry
Old Testament - The learning of the schools of Hillel and Shammai in Christ's time was preserved, after Jerusalem's fall, in those of Jabneh, Sepphoris, Caesarea, and Tiberias. The twofold Gemara, or commentary, completed the Talmud; the Jerusalem Gemara of the Jews of Tiberias was written at the end of the fourth century; the Babylonian emanated from the schools on the Euphrates at the end of the fifth century. " In the post-Talmudic period THE MASORAH (Buxtorf, Tiberias) notes:... (1) as to the verses, how many are in each book, the middle verse in each; how many begin with certain letters, or end with the same word, or had a certain number of words and letters, or certain words a number of times;... (2) as to the words, the Qeri 's (marginal readings) and kethib 's (readings of the text); also words found so many times in the beginning, middle, or end of a verse, or with a particular meaning; also in particular words where transcribers' mistakes were likely, whether they were to be written with or without the vowel letters; also the accentuation;... (3) as to the letters, how often each occurred in the Old Testament, etc. in the city of Tiberias
Synagogue - Their erection began probably at the close of the second century, the Jews employing Roman workmen, at the dictation of Roman rulers in the time of Antoninus Pins and Alexander Severus, during the spiritual supremacy of the Jewish patriarch of Tiberias. (See Tiberias
Capernaum - Political boundaries were so shifting, and the adjustments of territory in these little principalities were so constantly changed, that a loose use of terms grew up, and the more familiar names were apt to displace the less familiar, (b) The phrase εἱς τὸ πέραν cannot be pressed; it might be used of an oblique course from any one point on the shore of the Lake to any other: Josephus (Vita, § 59) uses διεπεραιώθην of taking ship from Tiberias to Taricheae, which are on the same side of the Lake, and very little farther from each other than Bethsaida from the scene of the miracle. And it is perhaps after all more probable that elaborate building took place at a time when Galilee had a prince of its own with architectural ambitions, who must have gathered around him a number of skilled artificers at Tiberias. We have seen that Theodosius came to it from Tiberias after passing through Magdala and Seven Fountains (Itin
Caesarea - A Rabbinic school was founded by Bar Qappara in the third century, and one student (Yohanvan bar Nappaha) of that school founded the academy of Tiberias
Synagogue - Josephus (Vita, 54) mentions the Great Synagogue at Tiberias, where during the Roman war political meetings took place (see also ‛Çrûb. Tiberias had thirteen synagogues (Ber. 8a), one in the village of Tiberias (Pesîḳ. -Like the Alexandrian Great Synagogue and the Hall of Hewn Stones in the Temple (Yômâ, 25a), the synagogue at Tiberias had the form of a basilica with a double row of pillars (Midr
City - Tiberias, built by Herod Antipas, was a stately city, whose ruins still indicate a wall three miles long. Though some were preponderantly Jewish, and others, such as Tiberias, almost exclusively Gentile, there was yet in them all a mingling of races and a tolerably free and humane intercourse
Gerasenes, Gergesenes - Sailing up the Lake from Wâdy Fîk, which is almost exactly opposite Tiberias, the next valley, about a mile north, is Wâdy es-Semak
Tabor - Due east you discover the sea of Tiberias, distant about one day's journey
Ship - With the large population round the Lake of Tiberias, there must have been a vast number of both fighting-boats and pleasure-boats, and boat-building must have been an active trade on its shores
Sepulchre - Travellers find them along the bases of hills and mountains in all parts of Syria; as on the south side of Hinnom, the west side of Olivet, at Tiberias, in Petra, in the gorge of the Barada, and in the sea-cliffs north on the Acre
Zebedee - His earlier years were spent in the midst of its fierce politics, He knew the various party watchwords; He knew what was meant by ‘wars and rumours of wars’; He had come into contact with soldiers from Tabor and Sepphoris, and early learned the terrors associated with the word ‘legion’; He had met returned slaves—redeemed, freed, or fugitive; He had wrought in the villages of this tribe, and we can even think of Joseph taking the young Jesus to work with him at Sepphoris during the busy days of its rebuilding—for there was not the same objection to entering it as the polluted Tiberias. They discuss the question as to what Jacob saw in vision, in that he blessed Zebulun immediately after Judah (Genesis 49:10-14), and the usual answer they give is that he foresaw the glories of Rabbinism in the presence of the Sanhedrin at Sepphoris before it was removed to Tiberias (Yalkut Shimeoni, i
Agrippa - After the death of Claudius, his successor, Nero, who had a great affection for Agrippa, to his other dominions added Julias in Persia, and that part of Galilee to which Tarichaea and Tiberias belonged
Galilee (2) - As for what is called Lower Galilee, it extends in length from Tiberias to Chabulon (Kâbûl), and Ptolemais is its neighbour on the coast; and its breadth is from the village called Xaloth (Iksâl), which lies in the great plain, to Bersabe, from which beginning the breadth of Upper Galilee is also taken to the village Baca, which divides the land of the Tyrians from Galilee; its length is also from Meloth (Meiron) to Thella (probably Tell Thala), a village near the Jordan’ (BJ iii. About the year 22, however, he built a new city on the shore 6f the Sea of Galilee, named it Tiberias in honour of the emperor, and made it his capital
Mary - , Mary of Magdala, a town on the western shore of the Lake of Tiberias
Galilee - After the fall of Jerusalem Galilee became famed for its rabbis and schools of Jewish learning; and the Sanhedrim or great council was removed to Sepphoris, and then to Tiberias
Lebanon - At the time this observation was made, the thermometer, in an elevated situation near the sea of Tiberias, stood at 102½ in the shade
James - Some days after the resurrection of our Saviour, James and John went to fish in the sea of Tiberias, where they saw Jesus
bi'Ble - Some Jewish scholars living at Tiberias, and at Sora by the Euphrates, from the sixth to the twelfth century, punctuated the Hebrew text, and wrote is the vowel points and other tone-marks to aid in the reading of the Hebrew; and these, together with notes of various kinds, they called Masora (tradition), hence the name Masoretic text
Galilee - These are Chorazin, Capernaum, Magdala, Tiberias, Taricheae, Hippos, Gamala, Gergesa, and Bethsaida. He re-built and fortified Sepphoris, his first capital, and a little later erected a new capital city on the west shore of the lake, calling it Tiberias, after the Emperor whose favour he enjoyed
Fig Tree - Hasselquist, in his journey from Nazareth to Tiberias, says, "We refreshed ourselves under the shade of a fig tree, where a shepherd and his herd had their rendezvous; but without either house or hut
Sanhedrim - After the return from Babylon, it remained at Jerusalem, as it is said, to the time of the sicarii or assassins; afterward it was removed to Jamnia, thence to Jericho, to Uzzah, to Sepharvaim, to Bethsamia, to Sephoris, and last of all to Tiberias, where it continued till its utter extinction
Palestine - The hot salt and fetid springs at Tiberias, Callirrhoe (wady Ζerka Μain , E. of lake Tiberias, the rock salt, niter, and sulphur of the Dead Sea, evidence volcanic agency. The Tiberias hot springs flowed more abundantly and increased in temperature during the earthquake of 1837
Palestine - Tiberias, built in A. It has several names—the Lake of Gennesaret, the Sea of Tiberias, Lake Chinnereth—but it is best known as the Sea of Galilee
Josephus - 100, and here Josephus endeavours to meet the charges with which Justus of Tiberias assailed his conduct during the war in Galilee in a. 1-2 [55-62]) with the tumults which he had already described in Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) , he describes from another source the founding of Tiberias by Herod Antipas (xviii. This outline will serve to show how little the narrative takes account of strict chronological sequence, as also-to take but one instance-how unwarranted it is of Schürer, on the supposed evidence of Josephus, to assign the foundation of Tiberias to a date after a
Wine - direction, on the main road to Tiberias
Herod - 56 Nero, who had meanwhile succeeded to the throne and expected his aid against the Parthians, added to his kingdom the regions of Tiberias and Taricheae, with Julias, a city of Peraea, and fourteen villages in its vicinity
Titus (Emperor) - Later he retired to Ptolemais, then to Caesarea on the coast, and afterwards to Caesarea Philippi, Scythopolis, and Tiberias
Canaan - The lake of Tiberias or Sea of Galilee, and lake Merom
Vespasian - Vespasian himself joined Herod Agrippa at Caesarea Philippi, and after twenty days marched against the cities Tarichea and Tiberias, which had revolted from him. The Roman party in the city surrendered Tiberias to Vespasian
Sanhedrin - 24a]) and continued in power under such form until the destruction of the Temple, when it was transferred to Jabneh, to Usha, to Sepphoris, and, finally, to Tiberias (Rôsh hash. Of the former, one is mentioned as the βουλή of Tiberias (Josephus, Vita, 12), whereas the Great Sanhedrin is referred to as the Sanhedrin of Jerusalem
Emmaus - An argument in favour of this has been based on the fact that the baths situated near Tiberias were called by the same name (cf
Houses - Pococke was at Tiberias, in Galilee, he was entertained by the sheik's steward, and with his company supped upon the top of the house for coolness, according to their custom, and lodged there likewise, in a sort of closet of about eight feet square, formed of wicker-work, plastered round toward the bottom, but without any door, each person having his cell
Synagogue - ] Life , § 54, of the synagogue of Tiberias)... The origin of the synagogue as a characteristic institution of Judaism is hidden in obscurity
Rome And the Roman Empire - 18, Herod Antipas, the son of Herod the Great, built his capital on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee and named it Tiberias after the emperor
Sepulchre - Even the Jews perpetuate the memory of certain celebrated Rabbis by honouring their tombs through the building of synagogues over them, which in turn have become centres of pilgrimage; that of the celebrated Talmudist Rabbi Meir, near Tiberias, is an illustrious example
Synagogue - But Josephus calls the proseucha of Tiberias a large house, which held very many persons
Philippi - , describes the προσευχή of Tiberias as μέγιστον οἴκημα καὶ πολὺν ὄχλον ἐπιδέξασθαι δυνάμενον (Vita, 54)
Nation (2) - Herod Antipas built Tiberias, S
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - 1140); for the Chaldee of Tobit he had a rabbi from Tiberias (pref. The Chronicles he went over word by word with a doctor of law from Tiberias (pref
Body (2) - Rather, it must be said that on the very day of His Resurrection the spirituality of His risen body was as clearly shown as in the case of that much later manifestation by the Sea of Tiberias (cf
Canaanites - The Girgashites lay next above the Amorites, on the east side of the Sea of Tiberias, and their land was afterward possessed by the half tribe of Manasseh
Night (2) - ... There is no reason to doubt the preference of Jesus for an abode where He would be sure of mountain solitude; we have no record that He entered Tiberias, which was a walled city (HGHL [Note: GHL Historical Geog
Scripture - The Massoretic text of today is the work of a body of scholars living at Tiberias, in Galilee, and at Sora in the Euphrates valley, who added the vowel points
Talmud - ’ The material which went to make up the Yerushalmi had been preparing in the academies, the centres of Jewish learning, of Palestine, chief among which was Tiberias; it was from here that Rabbi Jochanan issued the Yerushalmi , in its earliest form, during the middle of the 3rd cent
Cures - The balm of Gilead had an ancient reputation for healing virtue, and the Pools of Siloam and Bethesda and the springs at Tiberias and Callirrhoë were reputed to be curative
John the Apostle - 21 the two sons of Zebedee are among the group of seven disciples to whom our Lord appeared at the Sea of Tiberias, and again the disciple whom Jesus loved and Peter are distinguished: the one as the first to discern the risen Lord upon the shore, the other as the first to plunge into the water to go to Him
Palestine - After the destruction of Jerusalem many settled in Tiberias, and formed the nucleus of the important Galilæan Rabbinic schools, remains of which are still to be seen in the shape of the synagogues of Galilee
Herod - Tiberias, which he founded and named after the emperor, was one of his greatest works
Boyhood - Tiberias, Jericho, Tarichaea had each a hippodrome or a stadium (Schürer, ii
Canaan - Jerusalem, Hebron, Nablous, Tiberias, and in fact, the greater part of Palestine, are included in the pashalic of Damascus, now held in conjunction with that of Aleppo; which renders the present pasha, in effect, the viceroy of Syria
Education - The learned circle then moved northwards to Galilee, and Tiberias and Sepphoris became seats of Rabbinical training
Possession - _ Indications are not wanting that matters of diet and the use of restoratives were studied, and as healing appliances the balm of Gilead, the waters of Siloam and Bethesda, the hot springs of Tiberias and Callirhce were well known and widely used